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  1. #61

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by RedRaider430 View Post
    The main one I think of is Jean Patou's Patou Pour Homme. Many think the vintage PPH was one of the best men's fragrances in history.

    They quit making it for years but came out with a new formulation bearing the same name back in 2013 (I can't believe it's been that long). The new one had the same name (Patou Pour Homme), but to me, it smelled like a completely different fragrance. The vintage PPH was a classic men's oriental fougere, but the reformulation was as far from it as east is from west, IMO. It might as well have been an aquatic!

    And the fact that nobody ever talks about the new one suggests it was a massive fail.
    I agree that the 2013 version of PPH has noticeable differences from the original, with much less the oriental warmth and more the bright herbal tarragon and mossy patchouli. Overall I consider it a fougere with more emphasis on aromatic herbs and overall much more sparkling than PPH, like a spring/summer cologne version of the original PPH. I actually find it pretty decent especially considering today's market and limits imposed by regulations, although I agree that the original is much more complex.

    As for my pick on the topic, Caron Narcisse Noir now smells very different from the original Le Narcisse Noir. The original version has a very prominent leathery animalic musk, thus rendering the orange blossom much more sensual and dark, while the version that I tried a few years back is a rather elegant and proper orange blossom with an aldehyde-like soapy opening, and very different in mood.
    Currently wearing: Community by The Zoo

  2. #62
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    I think the house of CARON has done the very worst job at reformulating their classic scents. The current Tabac Blond is a miserable replacement for the vintage.

    CHANEL's new formulations of Bois des Iles and Cuir de Russie are beautiful, even if they aren't exact copies of the original scents.

  3. #63

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    ALL reformulations are criminal acts imo against ART, and avantgarde wich is what perfumes and scents USED to be....its all turned to watered down crap wich in itself is a trademark of todays culture

  4. #64
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    BIJAN for Men

    i purchased a current back up bottle thinking it was ok going by the reviews .
    Well it is not recognizable as vintage Bijan FM .
    Totally different to the brute powerhouse that was the original .
    In its place they are giving us a nice n soft frag that can easily bottled up as a feminine .
    Amongst the poorest reformulations in my opinion .


    " Wanted " empty bottle of Macassar
    Currently wearing: MCM Success by MCM

  5. #65
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    I think Jubilation xxv is the most noticeable for me.

  6. #66
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheetah1919 View Post
    I think Jubilation xxv is the most noticeable for me.
    How so?

  7. #67
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by LatinNote View Post
    How so?
    The older stuff, which I only have a couple decants of, has the beautiful warm smoky jam with perfect frankincense. The more recent version which I have a FB of, has some sort of a harsh note that feels like it is blocking some of the richness which makes xxv so amazing. It gets somewhat better in the drydown, but the stuff from ten years ago is better imo.

  8. #68
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Dimitrios View Post
    BIJAN for Men

    i purchased a current back up bottle thinking it was ok going by the reviews .
    Well it is not recognizable as vintage Bijan FM .
    Totally different to the brute powerhouse that was the original .
    In its place they are giving us a nice n soft frag that can easily bottled up as a feminine .
    Amongst the poorest reformulations in my opinion .
    Doesn't it even resemble the original stuff?
    I have the current formulation and have never smelled the original one. Now I understand why I didn't get all the talk about its brutal power...

  9. #69
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheetah1919 View Post
    The older stuff, which I only have a couple decants of, has the beautiful warm smoky jam with perfect frankincense. The more recent version which I have a FB of, has some sort of a harsh note that feels like it is blocking some of the richness which makes xxv so amazing. It gets somewhat better in the drydown, but the stuff from ten years ago is better imo.
    I have the current FB of the recent one, but would love to try the original pre-magnetic cap one. Too bad, they are hard to find, even on eBay. Sigh.

  10. #70
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by RCavs View Post
    Doesn't it even resemble the original stuff?
    I have the current formulation and have never smelled the original one. Now I understand why I didn't get all the talk about its brutal power...
    Nothing alike ...... I'lll be selling my bottle on Ebay next big sellout .
    Im lucky i have about 80mls of vintage juice in 2 bottles .
    Definately worth buying if you can locate some .
    cheers


    " Wanted " empty bottle of Macassar
    Currently wearing: MCM Success by MCM

  11. #71
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by rum View Post
    I am not saying reformulations don't occur, I just find it hard to be calling stuff like Creed Aventus, Chanel Allure Homme, YSL La Nuit, Dior Homme Intense and Musc Ravageur by their "vintage" and modern or current formulation. Seems strange to me.
    Blame those houses for formulating so quickly that we have to stretch a term to refer to different eras of a fragrance's production, where an era can be just a year or two.

    The term "vintage" outside of the Vintage Perfume sub-forum means "pre-reformulation", and everyone know what we're talking about. It's in this sub-forum that the use of the term "vintage" sets people off when used in that context, and 9 times out of 10 it's set off by someone talking about Aventus specifically. Blame IFRA and fragrance houses for reformulating their fragrances so quickly after release that we have to stretch the term "vintage" to describe changes for the worse that should be happening either A) not at all, or B) through decades and decades.

    Instead it happens almost immediately, and us hobbyists are tasked with how to describe a 2007 bottle of something compared to a 2016 bottle of the same fragrance.

    If you're really bothered by this, then I don't suggest ever going on eBay and typing in "vintage Aventus" - you won't like what you find.

  12. #72
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by mustardsalad View Post
    Blame those houses for formulating so quickly that we have to stretch a term to refer to different eras of a fragrance's production, where an era can be just a year or two.

    The term "vintage" outside of the Vintage Perfume sub-forum means "pre-reformulation", and everyone know what we're talking about. It's in this sub-forum that the use of the term "vintage" sets people off when used in that context, and 9 times out of 10 it's set off by someone talking about Aventus specifically. Blame IFRA and fragrance houses for reformulating their fragrances so quickly after release that we have to stretch the term "vintage" to describe changes for the worse that should be happening either A) not at all, or B) through decades and decades.

    Instead it happens almost immediately, and us hobbyists are tasked with how to describe a 2007 bottle of something compared to a 2016 bottle of the same fragrance.

    If you're really bothered by this, then I don't suggest ever going on eBay and typing in "vintage Aventus" - you won't like what you find.
    Excellent post!




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