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  1. #1
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    I decided to start this thread regarding the reformulation of fragrances which have deviated the most from their original counterparts (for better or for worse). Deviations such as: kinds of smell, concentration/strength of smell, notes, and color.

    Please keep in mind that I am not, in any way, advocating/supporting fragrance reformulations. In fact, I personally prefer it doesn't happen even though I understand why. I just want to be more informed.

    Thank you in advance!
    Esteban
    Last edited by LatinNote; 2nd May 2019 at 03:36 PM. Reason: Changed "vintage" to "original"

  2. #2

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Starting off with:

    Creed Aventus - Spoken on this at length in various threads buts ultimately the vintage juice and modern would be totally unrecognizable if it weren't for the fact that they both still used the same raw materials because the accords, ratios, complexity and overall depth are worlds apart as the original smelled like a living 3D scene that rolled out its nuances for hours whereas the current stuff is a still 2D picture of one section of the old vista.

    Chanel Allure Homme - The vintage and current versions are literally nothing like each other and I'm stunned that more people don't pick up on this as they changed virtually every single facet of the fragrance from what made it such a great excursion in masterful blending and complexity into what now smells like a plasticy Diet Shalimar.

    YSL La Nuit - The original was a very appealing masterpiece straight out of the gate thanks mainly to the seductive use of the cardamon and how beautifully it all wore. The current version on the other hand is reed thin, very pedestrian and has very little in common with what once made it great. Truly a "shell of its former glories" to roll out a BN stalwart phrase...

    Bn9 Scent Of Peace For Him - First take was honkingly huge, almost to the point of being unwearable (and that excessive juniper didn't help) so Bond very kindly just diluted the juice to a third of its strength a while back.

    D&G Pour Homme - The Italian version was something else, even though I don't like that style of scent I could appreciate its beauty when I inhaled it on someone else and bagged a sample. Got hold of a UK release and blech! Night and day isn't far apart enough to describe the difference.

    A couple that improved with time:

    Dior Fahrenheit - Whats on the market now more than holds a candle to what came before in many respects and is very impressive considering the ups and downs many other scents have gone through in 30 years especially when you think about that vanilla blip in the 00s and the immense amount of IFRA regs in between inception and the current marketplace.

    Dior Homme Intense - People were crying when the originals went their way and the immense eBay price hikes came but I actually enjoyed the later version much more as I wasn't much of a fan of the iris accord back then. The reform just smells so much better in so many respects as its blend is far superior and more balanced.

    And one I haven't tried but would like to:

    FM Musc Ravageur - One I haven't smelled the original incarnation of but if the word on the scentsphere is anything to go by the reform is actually the scent done right as it polishes off all of the rough edges and general abrasiveness of the first incarnation whilst allowing the best aspects to shine. Anyone who has smelled both care to opine?

  3. #3

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Thank you Palmolive, very insightful.

  4. #4
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Incredible. Thanks Palmolive!

  5. #5

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    All good buds, I could probably reel off loads more if I stopped and thought about it as I can play spot the difference with fragrances really easily due to how I perceive smells but those were the first ones that came to mind with the biggest changes.

    Stuff like LIDGE was also very obviously tweaked but the difference was much more subtle as 80% of the scent remained the same (This is the 1st reform around 2012 and not the latter one which I haven't smelled yet but is supposed to be more modernized/airier) but the subtle touches provided by the star anise and elemi totally changed the character of the scent in the air on very cold days (which is when it shines with its enveloping warmth) as a lot of its allure for me was the nuances and interplay they bought to the table but most people just concentrate on the big flashing lights and thus are blinded to the smaller spectacles that dance in their own way to the side but are overall just as much a part of the show and are conspicuous in their absence.

    Bleu de Chanel EDT on the other hand was just simply diluted around the time the EDP came out as it feels like they watered down the original formula by about 20% and this kind of trick is very, very common with numerous scents throughout the years where its obviously a cost cutting/squeezing more money out of a line trick that they tend to pull when a "new and improved" version is about to hit the market. The performance is often the first thing to take a hit here as well as the scent going from a 100w lightbulb down to a 60w and whilst it doesn't sound like a huge drop its nearly half of what it was if you think about it but if you look at it the other way its still 2/3rds recognizable...


    This hobby is the most subjective one could ever have due to how intimate the nature of decoding the experience is and how that relates to the granularity of our senses as well as our olfactive lexicon and ability to express the impressions therin and this is why I feel so many people say "It smells just the same hurrr durrr" and others say "Its a shell of its former glories herp derp" because ultimately both are right and if you can't smell the difference then more power to you but just because you can't spot the changes doesn't mean they ain't there so it is what it is....

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Palmolive View Post
    Chanel Allure Homme - The vintage and current versions are literally nothing like each other and I'm stunned that more people don't pick up on this as they changed virtually every single facet of the fragrance from what made it such a great excursion in masterful blending and complexity into what now smells like a plasticy Diet Shalimar.
    Definitely can relate to this.
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  7. #7

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Palmolive View Post
    All good buds, I could probably reel off loads more if I stopped and thought about it as I can play spot the difference with fragrances really easily due to how I perceive smells but those were the first ones that came to mind with the biggest changes.

    Stuff like LIDGE was also very obviously tweaked but the difference was much more subtle as 80% of the scent remained the same (This is the 1st reform around 2012 and not the latter one which I haven't smelled yet but is supposed to be more modernized/airier)
    Yeah, the current LIDGE version (or I should say LIDG EDP) feels like a relatively modern crowd-pleaser, just one that's above average in build quality. I got my nose on some older juice and I don't think it's night and day different but you can tell that things have been smoothed out a bit.

    I do like the current edition of the LIDG EDT a lot, though, but I'm seemingly in the minority for championing it over LIDGE/LIDG EDP.
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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    The main one I think of is Jean Patou's Patou Pour Homme. Many think the vintage PPH was one of the best men's fragrances in history.

    They quit making it for years but came out with a new formulation bearing the same name back in 2013 (I can't believe it's been that long). The new one had the same name (Patou Pour Homme), but to me, it smelled like a completely different fragrance. The vintage PPH was a classic men's oriental fougere, but the reformulation was as far from it as east is from west, IMO. It might as well have been an aquatic!

    And the fact that nobody ever talks about the new one suggests it was a massive fail.
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  9. #9
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by RedRaider430 View Post
    The main one I think of is Jean Patou's Patou Pour Homme. Many think the vintage PPH was one of the best men's fragrances in history.

    They quit making it for years but came out with a new formulation bearing the same name back in 2013 (I can't believe it's been that long). The new one had the same name (Patou Pour Homme), but to me, it smelled like a completely different fragrance. The vintage PPH was a classic men's oriental fougere, but the reformulation was as far from it as east is from west, IMO. It might as well have been an aquatic!

    And the fact that nobody ever talks about the new one suggests it was a massive fail.
    Wow

  10. #10
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Man, I would REALLY like to get a bottle of the original Chanel Allure Homme, or at least a decant of it, even though I have a bottle of the current one. Anyone have the original, PM me.
    Last edited by LatinNote; 2nd May 2019 at 03:37 PM. Reason: Changed "vintage" to "original"

  11. #11

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Red for Men/GBH by EA Fragrances bears little resemblance to the "vintage" version, IMO, but Preferred Stock is actually closer to vintage, or at least it used to be.
    Last edited by Bigsly; 1st May 2019 at 04:36 AM.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Adding Guerlain Derby
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  13. #13
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Shemelimelle View Post
    Hah?! GBH? It’s after my bedtime. I need to search that up. The only GBH I know stands for Great British Hardcore. Rates up there with the crappiest crap I’d ever seen. You don’t want to know. I’ll use the search bar.
    Your post cracked me up, lol. But yeah, I was wondering what GBH stood for too.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Palmolive View Post
    Dior Homme Intense - People were crying when the originals went their way and the immense eBay price hikes came but I actually enjoyed the later version much more as I wasn't much of a fan of the iris accord back then. The reform just smells so much better in so many respects as its blend is far superior and more balanced.
    The original silver collar formulation was what truly shined. IMO none of the reformulations brought the same satisfaction as the original.
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  15. #15

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Couldn't agree more on Chanel Allure Homme and Aventus.

    You can just look at the color of the juice on Allure Homme. Vintage is dark and rich, current stuff is as clear as water. Same thing with Egoiste, current version is crystal clear. Chanel needs to take notes from Dior on how to reformulate fragrances if you ask me.

    Would also add Dunhil Edition and Esencia Loewe. Both are vastly different to their vintage counterparts, and not in a good way.
    Currently wearing: Vetiver by Guerlain

  16. #16

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Shemelimelle View Post
    Hah?! GBH? It’s after my bedtime. I need to search that up. The only GBH I know stands for Great British Hardcore. Rates up there with the crappiest crap I’d ever seen. You don’t want to know. I’ll use the search bar.
    How many Red for Men will you see if you search the fragrance sites? I'm not sure there is any other than the one by Giorgio of Beverly Hills, certainly no other vintage one by that name, other than perhaps something super obscure.
    Last edited by Bigsly; 1st May 2019 at 05:07 PM.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by LatinNote View Post
    Man, I would REALLY like to get a bottle of the vintage Chanel Allure Homme, or at least a decant of it, even though I have a bottle of the current one. Anyone have the vintage, PM me.
    You can still find vintage bottles of Allure Homme pretty often on eBay for much less than Chanel retail prices for the new one. You just need to be careful and make sure you're buying from a reputable seller.
    Currently wearing: Vetiver by Guerlain

  18. #18

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Off topic a little bit: Basicly: growing up in the 80s and walking into the perfumery and in general every scent was striking....all hits....going into Gallerie Lafayette or Le Printemps in Paris mid 80s and be in scent heaven.....deep engraved in my soul.....very deep......
    Nowadays everything is a let down to me, even hunting an vintage is dissapointing most of the time...Thinking of quiting it all together, use up what ive got already and thats that.

  19. #19
    Dependent Marand75's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Ah yes, the good ol' vintage vs reform...
    Sometimes there's more to it than just reformulation when talking about differences in scent. Storage, oxidation, maceration and so on, allthough these factors may weigh heavier in much older vintages, I admit
    But, staying true to the title, I'd mention Trussardi Uomo. The orig greyhound-logo juice is smooth/creamy/leathery/oakmossy oozing out truckloads of italian elegance, whereas the crest-logo crap is a totally different scent, becoming so overly metallic with synthetic woods and a sweet leather-imitation. In short, these two iterations have absolutely NOTHING in common whatsoever, except for the name...

    A successful reform/re-launch would be Enrico Coveri Pour Homme. Smells practically the same. A dry herbal mediterranean with a pinch of leather.


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  20. #20

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Luten's Fleurs d'Oranger is the one where I noticed the most marked difference. I had an old sample that was heavier on the cumin, and relied less on the sweet white flower accord. Fell in love, went to buy a bottle, only to be rather disappointed that it was now leaning the other way, with practically no cumin involved.

    Quote Originally Posted by cpp214 View Post
    You can still find vintage bottles of Allure Homme pretty often on eBay for much less than Chanel retail prices for the new one. You just need to be careful and make sure you're buying from a reputable seller.
    With Chanel being the most faked brand out there, I'd be extra careful and extra hesitant, though. I've seen sellers with stellar feedback selling fakes simply because the people weren't knowledgeable enough to tell the difference between fake and real.

  21. #21

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    CARVEN Vetiver (i have the one with the wooden cap) is very different from the new one.

  22. #22
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by cpp214 View Post
    You can still find vintage bottles of Allure Homme pretty often on eBay for much less than Chanel retail prices for the new one. You just need to be careful and make sure you're buying from a reputable seller.
    I'm hoping I don't go that route. I'd much rather try/buy the original from a reputable Basenoter. I've purchased from a few Basenoters and have been very pleased.
    Last edited by LatinNote; 2nd May 2019 at 03:39 PM. Reason: Changed "vintage" to "original"

  23. #23
    Basenotes Junkie grayspoole's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Where does one even begin?

    I'll vote for Givenchy L'Interdit (1957) which has undergone many reformulations, with the 2003 version probably the worst of all since it was unacknowledged and the marketing still exploited the Audrey Hepburn association. While still citing the history, at least the current L'Interdit (2018) is described as a "new modern version" and is fronted by Rooney Mara.
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  24. #24
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    How do you look up a batch number of a bottle of fragrance and determine what year it is? How do you go about this? Any help would be appreciated.

  25. #25

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Seconding especially Trussardi Uomo and adding Givenchy Gentleman- those two were bad boy leathers of powerhouse chypre elegance and luxurious quality, craftiness and complexity back in the day, now they are mere inoffensive designer mainstream released with just enough conformity to garner bestselling figures (or to have at least the potential to do so) without much if any effort from the respective fragrance houses

  26. #26
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken_Russell View Post
    Seconding especially Trussardi Uomo and adding Givenchy Gentleman- those two were bad boy leathers of powerhouse chypre elegance and luxurious quality, craftiness and complexity back in the day, now they are mere inoffensive designer mainstream released with just enough conformity to garner bestselling figures (or to have at least the potential to do so) without much if any effort from the respective fragrance houses
    That breaks my heart

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Caron's En Avion and Tabac Blond are two that come to mind. They're now just innocuous floral scents, having lost their edge and intriguing undertones. Today's Je Reviens (Worth) is sharp, uninteresting and almost unpleasant, compared to its former sparkling self. The Guerlains have really suffered. This sad state of affairs is understandable, since the best vintage perfumes were formulated with heavy doses of now-restricted ingredients - one can't really fault the perfumers working in today's environment.

  28. #28
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    So far, it appears the reformulations in general have been for worse, not better or the same. It's my hope the companies take note and find a way to curb this, all the while, challenge the current and younger generation to develop refined noses instead of allowing themselves to be continually "dumbed down" (for lack of a better word). I do not intend to offend anyone. If I did, I apologize.

  29. #29

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by LatinNote View Post
    So far, it appears the reformulations in general have been for worse, not better or the same.
    In general, yes.

    But there are plenty of relatively unnoticed or unremarked upon reformulations because drastic changes weren't made to the fragrance over its lifespan, and other reformulations are more different than actually quantitatively worse (for example, there are folks on here and elsewhere that prefer the newer Guerlain Vetiver to some prior incarnations). We all have different likes and dislikes and oddities. Someone who isn't an oakmoss addict might reasonably enjoy that a fragrance has been given a contemporary facelift, assuming said facelift was done with care.

    So, yes, reformulations are a very real thing, but there are also plenty of false accusations of reformulations that are fictions of the mind, and some perceived changes are real but stem primarily from factors that aren't rooted in the actual formulation (like how long the fragrance has been aged in the bottle, etc.).

    I'm always a bit bummed out when Fear of Reformulation keeps folks from trying a fragrance they might otherwise have really enjoyed or even loved. Unless the current version is an undeniable travesty I generally encourage folks to check something out if it intrigues them, regardless of reformulation concerns.
    Current Favorites
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  30. #30
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Brooks Otterlake View Post
    In general, yes.

    But there are plenty of relatively unnoticed or unremarked upon reformulations because drastic changes weren't made to the fragrance over its lifespan, and other reformulations are more different than actually quantitatively worse (for example, there are folks on here and elsewhere that prefer the newer Guerlain Vetiver to some prior incarnations). We all have different likes and dislikes and oddities. Someone who isn't an oakmoss addict might reasonably enjoy that a fragrance has been given a contemporary facelift, assuming said facelift was done with care.

    So, yes, reformulations are a very real thing, but there are also plenty of false accusations of reformulations that are fictions of the mind, and some perceived changes are real but stem primarily from factors that aren't rooted in the actual formulation (like how long the fragrance has been aged in the bottle, etc.).

    I'm always a bit bummed out when Fear of Reformulation keeps folks from trying a fragrance they might otherwise have really enjoyed or even loved. Unless the current version is an undeniable travesty I generally encourage folks to check something out if it intrigues them, regardless of reformulation concerns.
    Very well said. Thank you!

    I think it would be cool if some brands would go back to some of their more popular originals and re-offer them again as some sort of limited edition bottles, at least to see how well it does in today's world. A sort of trial run, or an anniversary tribute. Just thinking out loud.
    Last edited by LatinNote; 2nd May 2019 at 03:42 PM. Reason: Changed "vintages" to "originals"




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