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  1. #1
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    Default I don't like the term "blender".

    I really don't like the term, "blender". Every material has it's strength level, and it's place.
    You can't use a pyrazine at ten percent of a fragrance, but you can with Iso E Super.
    To me, that doesn't make Iso E Super a blender, it just means that it's strength is less, and attributes are different, and so, you use those molecules differently..

    Perfumery is in knowing the materials, and how best to use them.
    To me, calling something a blender shows immaturity in knowing how and where to use a material for what it is best used for.

    c# on the piano keyboard isn't a blender note, it's simply a note.
    The difference, is in how you use that note in a composition.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1h35qGpDWsQ

  2. #2
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    Default I don't like the term "blender".

    I don’t know a damn thing about making perfume but can see how “blender” would not be a correct term. It would seem there’s a better word to use. Like “note”. And a note is a note is a note. Perhaps a group of notes make a ‘chord’ or rather an accord, as I realize you experts can take multiple notes and trick my nose into believing it’s smelling a rich and dense version of a single note. A more accurate, and yet still inaccurate, stretch would be to refer to the alcohol (or even carrier oil) as the “blender”. But, I’m just a dumb enthusiast that enjoys reading how you all do what you do. So WTH do I know? Just ignore me.
    Sent from the bayou, using homing gators.

  3. #3

    Default Re: I don't like the term "blender".

    When speaking to a senior perfumer at Givaudan he used the term "builders" and I see that as a better way to describe low impact/transparent materials. Stuff that acts more as a foundation, not as just an inert mixer. I'm on the same page as you in terms of using blender to describe things. But the difference of say 35% Hedione to 40% surely will not be very noticeable, but it can fill gaps in the formula when needed.


  4. #4

    Default Re: I don't like the term "blender".

    [deleted]
    Last edited by Bill Roberts; 22nd June 2019 at 02:37 AM.

  5. #5

    Default Re: I don't like the term "blender".

    Quote Originally Posted by pkiler View Post
    You can't use a pyrazine at ten percent of a fragrance
    I mean...you could.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: I don't like the term "blender".

    The vague notion of a blender I tend to understand like this:

    Component A:

    A.png

    Component B:

    B.png

    Blender:

    C.png

    Components A and B mixed:

    AB.png

    Components A,B together with the blender:

    ABC.png
    Attached Images Attached Images
    • File Type: png C.png (4.0 KB, 98 views)
    Attached Files Attached Files

  7. #7

    Default Re: I don't like the term "blender".

    [scratching head in puzzlement]

  8. #8
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    Default Re: I don't like the term "blender".

    The images are a bit of a fiasco...
    I'll try with words.

    Let's say I want to blend a fig accord. γ-Decalactone some Stemone and perhaps trace of δ-damascone does a fair impression of a fig; green: Stemone, fruity-lactonic: γ-decalactone, fruity-green: δ-damascone; but it will still smell like mixture of these three. cis-3-Hexenyl benzoate doesn't smell much like any of the prominent features of a fig but adding it to the mix might help it smell more like a fig and less like a mixture of used components. Thus, in this mixture c3h-benzoate acts as a blender.

  9. #9

    Default Re: I don't like the term "blender".

    I understand your point now, thank you. That would seem a reasonable personal use of the word "blender."

    [remainder deleted]
    Last edited by Bill Roberts; 21st June 2019 at 11:52 PM.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: I don't like the term "blender".

    Wesley, That Givaudan Perfumer word of "builder", I think is the perfect descriptor...
    Excellent...
    Am purging all usage of "Blender" in my mind, replacing it with "Builder".

    :-)

  11. #11
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    Default Re: I don't like the term "blender".

    Quote Originally Posted by xii View Post
    T
    Components A,B together with the blender:

    ABC.png

    Uh, I see PK there! HAHAHA!

  12. #12

    Default Re: I don't like the term "blender".

    Brillient visual pun/explanation I approve lol

    With blender it's kinda the point of accords. Comming up with something that is greater than the sum of it's parts. Asking what blender your accord needs is just???

  13. #13

    Default Re: I don't like the term "blender".

    I see the point of "blender" as term when the function is very specific, but something that is acting to make one accord pull together likely will not be the thing to pull another together, so "blender" is more the function it's serving at the moment than what it is as a substance.
    Last edited by Bill Roberts; 22nd June 2019 at 02:40 AM.

  14. #14

    Default Re: I don't like the term "blender".

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Roberts View Post
    ...so "blender" is more the function it's serving at the moment than what it is as a substance.
    totally agree here (beside that every substance will also contribute to the aroma and cannot be reduced to its function...).
    for me its the same with the term 'modifier', which i absolutely didnt get until today what it should actually mean. its much more one part of an accord, isnt it?

    i'm very aware that every discipline has its own terminology, which is a good and necessary thing to have, and i guess that 'blender' or 'modifier' is somehow a descriptor to name the way how a certain material is used, rather than a general classification. as you said, bill.




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