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  1. #61

    Default Re: First perfume - what to add?

    Ok, the order arrived, now I have small amounts of (10 mls each):
    Habanolide Subst (Fir)
    Ethylene brassylate
    Vanillin 25% in DPG
    Decalactone gamma
    Linalyl acetate
    Coumarin 10% in DPG
    Indole 10% in DPG
    Benzyl salicylate
    Benzyl acetate
    Kephalis (Giv)
    Nerolidol
    Aurantiol 50% in DPG
    Floralozone (IFF)
    Hedione
    Macrolide Supra (Sym)
    Iso E Super (IFF) (I don't particularly like this one out of the bottle)
    Ionone alpha-
    Lyral (IFF)

    EO:
    Oakmoss abs 5%
    Benzoin Siam res 50%
    Guaiac wood
    Jasmine 20 %
    Neroli 10 %
    Labdanum res 45%
    Canaga
    Ylang Ylang
    Grapefruit (and about almost any standard citrus)
    Eucalyptus
    Spearmint
    Sandalwood
    Cedarwood
    Lavender
    Tobacco 10 %
    much more EOs..

    The EO blend I want to build my perfume around is Grapefruit-Eucalyptus-Ylang

    Please, please, please:
    some suggestions of where to start, i.e. a basic formula using the EO blend and ACs (and other EOs?) I can play around with for a start.

  2. #62

    Default Re: First perfume - what to add?

    Quote Originally Posted by tarata View Post
    The EO blend I want to build my perfume around is Grapefruit-Eucalyptus-Ylang
    Please, please, please:
    some suggestions of where to start, i.e. a basic formula using the EO blend and ACs (and other EOs?) I can play around with for a start.
    My recommendation tarata would be that you start with learning about a basic Cologne formula. ie: a fresh, zesty, citrus-heavy. simple and effective and indicative of where modern perfume started. Use Grapefruit 5%, Lemon 20-30%, Orange 5-10% and especially Bergamot 40-50%.
    Think 4711 launched in 1792 and still going strong.These EO all mix well in variable proportions. Bergamot is the key material.

    A touch of ylang (0.3%), if you REALLY want it, once you have the citrus accord built .... although
    Neroli 5% will really support this much better. Do you have Petitgrain?

    Floralozone can give it an "airy" fun lift (also especially good
    to modernize lily of the valley)

    For the aromatic side:
    If you want to add a eucalyptus to this please only a VERY small amount. rosemary would be preferred. Also any Lavender go VERY light.

    Linalool and
    Linalyl acetate are useful to boost the Bergamot that is already full of those two chemicals.
    A light musk base of
    Macrolide Supra.

    A touch of benzyl acetate perhaps. Try an experiment and add some BA to a small portion of your Cologne, and see what a difference it can make.


  3. #63

    Default Re: First perfume - what to add?

    A little goes a long way with several of your materials - if possible I’d dilute vanillin even more as well as spearmint, benzoin, labdanum and guaiacwood.

    Try creating simple citrus accords using grapefruit, orange, bergamot and whatever else you have. In one, add more grapefruit than orange, lemon, etc., and in another add more orange than the other oils, and so on. Find something you like then go from there.

    As Julian mentioned, I’d carefully dose eucalyptus. Too much and that is all you will smell!

    When I first started I overdosed everything lol, and it was a mess. Once I added like 10% mandarin aldehyde and couldn’t get the smell out of my nose for days! Practicing will help. I’ve learned a bunch in the past 2.5 years since first starting.

    Keep us posted!

  4. #64
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    Default Re: First perfume - what to add?

    I would try something simple to start learning what you're working with. I would try choosing 6 ingredients-- 2 top, 2 heart, 2 base. Preferably, ones you've already been familiarized with. Try mixing each section of notes-- top heart and base-- separately from one another. Once you've got those specifications, mix in the top, heart and base notes until you find something you like. For a better idea of a final product, dilute the raw materials you're working with to at least 10%. You'll learn much about how the ingredients work with one another just by this little start, and you'll learn how to balance different strength molecules.
    Don't bite off more than you can chew!

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A5010 using Tapatalk
    Cheers, Happy Perfuming!
    Will

  5. #65

    Default Re: First perfume - what to add?

    thanks everyone who replied
    Yes, I want to start super simple to get an idea of what the ACs do. I just don't know to to start off with it. From what you guys write I infer that there is no "standard" amount of, say, Benzyl salicylate that is used in an agreeable fragrance and there are no no-gos in terms of what goes together, so I just try around a little?

    One thing I'm not sure I understand is dilution. Do I need to dilute the e.g. Benzyl salicylate or can I just use a tiny amount using a plastic pipette? Also, I have the EO-blend I love riping in a bottle since weeks now. I was wondering whether I can dilute that blend (it's very strong) using perfumer's alc and then use the dilution and add the ACs? Or is this a no-go and the alc always needs to be added last once the fragrant mix is done?

  6. #66
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    Default Re: First perfume - what to add?

    Quote Originally Posted by tarata View Post
    thanks everyone who replied
    Yes, I want to start super simple to get an idea of what the ACs do. I just don't know to to start off with it. From what you guys write I infer that there is no "standard" amount of, say, Benzyl salicylate that is used in an agreeable fragrance and there are no no-gos in terms of what goes together, so I just try around a little?

    One thing I'm not sure I understand is dilution. Do I need to dilute the e.g. Benzyl salicylate or can I just use a tiny amount using a plastic pipette? Also, I have the EO-blend I love riping in a bottle since weeks now. I was wondering whether I can dilute that blend (it's very strong) using perfumer's alc and then use the dilution and add the ACs? Or is this a no-go and the alc always needs to be added last once the fragrant mix is done?
    The whole point of dilution is
    1. Not killing your nose in the process of building the perfume. You don't want to smell most ingredients at full strength. Your nose will die out for the day almost instantly depending on the ingredients.
    2. It's more accurate to work with diluted materials while trying to maintain a more accurate form of measure. You don't want to add 0.03 g of a material-- that usually is (very very roughly) 1.5 drops to be added. Not only is that pretty much impossible to achieve, but it is also extremely inaccurate. But, say, you added 0.30 g of that same material at 10% dilution. this is the same amount of that material, just with alcohol in the mix so it's much more accurate.

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A5010 using Tapatalk
    Cheers, Happy Perfuming!
    Will

  7. #67

    Default Re: First perfume - what to add?

    Take a look at The Good Scents Company’s incredible database:

    http://www.thegoodscentscompany.com/data/rw1001792.html

    I am not joking when I say I’m on their site almost daily. The information on there is phenomenal, IMO. For instance, take a look at the link I provided for Benzyl Salicilate...The “Safety in Use” gives recommended usage levels or if IFRA restricted, the max use levels. The “Blenders” section provides a lot of potential materials that blend well with Benzyl Salicylate. Very helpful site!

  8. #68
    Basenotes Member aberdeengrey's Avatar
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    Default Re: First perfume - what to add?

    Quote Originally Posted by julian35 View Post
    My recommendation tarata would be that you start with learning about a basic Cologne formula. ie: a fresh, zesty, citrus-heavy. simple and effective and indicative of where modern perfume started. Use Grapefruit 5%, Lemon 20-30%, Orange 5-10% and especially Bergamot 40-50%.
    Think 4711 launched in 1792 and still going strong.These EO all mix well in variable proportions. Bergamot is the key material.

    A touch of ylang (0.3%), if you REALLY want it, once you have the citrus accord built .... although
    Neroli 5% will really support this much better. Do you have Petitgrain?

    Floralozone can give it an "airy" fun lift (also especially good
    to modernize lily of the valley)

    For the aromatic side:
    If you want to add a eucalyptus to this please only a VERY small amount. rosemary would be preferred. Also any Lavender go VERY light.

    Linalool and
    Linalyl acetate are useful to boost the Bergamot that is already full of those two chemicals.
    A light musk base of
    Macrolide Supra.

    A touch of benzyl acetate perhaps. Try an experiment and add some BA to a small portion of your Cologne, and see what a difference it can make.

    I second everything here as its similar to how I got myself moving in the right direction - making colognes is quite straightforward and the results are amazing. 50g of perfumers alchohol, 1g bergamot, 0.7g neroli, 0.3-0.4g of rosemary, 0.1g petitgrain, 0.17g lime eo, 0.03g benzyl acetate (takes the nasty edge of the citrus), 0.17g lemon eo. Its a very short lived cologne that after a few days of sitting around smells like traditional splash ons. On that specific formula, I can see from my notes that over the course of a few months my comments changed from "smells like rosemary and nasty pine" to "its a pleasant, short burst of citrus with gentle herbs, identifiable as rosemary". Time, temperature, blending still or mixing dynamically are big factors.

    Change the proportions to suit and learn.

    When you get bored of colognes, try flowers. A rose could be as simple as 04.g geraniol, 0.35g PEA, 0.35g citronellol. Then try the same but ad a small amount of your ionone alpha and then pat yourself on the back.

    You want your cologne to last longer, split the bottle into two - then to one of them add some heavier molecules - habanolide, ethylene brassylate and compare like for like. Tiniest dose of oakmoss, youll find that hours after the hespiridous notes have vanished that the green moss smell is very faintly sitting on your skin.

    There are plenty of floral basic accord formulas on the net, rose, lily, orangeflower, jasmine are good recognisable ones to kick off with.

  9. #69
    Super Member Ivor Joedy's Avatar
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    Default Re: First perfume - what to add?

    Quote Originally Posted by tarata View Post
    I searched for perfumes that have all three notes -- Eucalyptus, Grapefruit and Ylang Ylang -- in them and could not find any.
    You can start with a proven, easy as possible but beautiful, formulation and then change it, extend it (Hedione, Neroli ...).
    Bergamot and Lime or Mandarine can easily be changed or extended by Grapefruit and Eucalyptus (Citriodora).
    The sum amounts to 100: %, drops, grams, what ever you want, you have to tune it anyway.


    -- JARDIN VERT --
    Orig. Autor: Mrs Brigitte Bräutigam
    Chypre green: flowery-green, elegant, mossy-woody, warm

    HEAD

    - Bergamot (21)
    - Lime (13)
    - Mandarine green (7)
    - Galbanum (6)

    HEART

    - Ylang Ylang (18)
    - Geranium (9)
    - Magnolia Leaves (8)

    BASE

    - Sandalwood (4)
    - Ambrette seed (9)
    - Oak moss (5)




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