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  1. #1

    Default Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    There's and interesting discussion that was started on this thread
    http://www.basenotes.net/threads/467...e-de-Rochasout
    about oak moss in vintage perfume that was needing a new topic thread so here it is.
    I'd like to hear more from vintage BN experts about oak moss and how that note changes over the life of the juice. The other thread mentions chypres as displaying a marked change. Chypres happen to be some of my favorites so I am especially interested in this. I am having trouble with identifying oak moss and have been getting feelings of rawness and heat in my lungs when sniffing some very vintage perfumes as well as some heavy oak moss non-IFRA current releases. I hope I'm not sensitive because I don't want to have to give up oak moss, but that is another discussion. I do not have a sample of oak moss but plan to obtain one.
    I've been looking at vintage nips lately (now don't everyone go stampede and buy them up because I haven't gotten any yet), as a way to compare my vintage perfumes with the same version from the sealed tubes. Would it be reasonable to see less of a change in the oak moss in those vials than in a flacon that has had evaporation, etc? Theoretically those samples are supposed to fresher - would it be helpful to me to use them as a general comparison, but also as a way to have more awareness of the oak moss?
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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    I've read through the reference thread and do know what Gilturko (the OP) is talking about, re the strong syrupy base overwhelming some bottles of vintage perfume (especially chypres) - but rather than the base taking over, I think what happens is that top and middle notes evaporate until only the base remains. By definition, the base supports lighter structures; It's never seemed to me that the base absorbs them. Oakmoss is like beautifully planed and polished mahogany, uplifting and complementing whatever lights upon it, setting those things off to their best advantage and contributing a special tone or feeling to the whole. It is a constituent of steady vintage bases, but not the single ingredient that gives a turned vintage perfume its bitter, varnishy smell. I do not detect a rawness or heat to it (as Gilturko reports in the other thread); as grayspoole says in the other thread, people who experience oakmoss in that way might indeed have an acute sensitivity to it. For me, it is smooth, rich and deep, enveloping but never suffocating.

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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    I agree with Bonnette. Vintage perfumes contain many ingredients and I don't think it's oakmoss that is problematic. Typically, the ingredients that turn first are the more volatile ones, like citrus and aldehydes. They turn into varnish, or into something that feels like burnt or cooked. And all chypres have bergamot, and often also aldehydes added. but of course one could well be sensitive to oakmoss or other materials.

    My view of oakmoss is like Bonnette's, it's not heavy, but it polishes and gives longevity to a composition. It's as much about the effect that it has on other materials than the smell per se. If you were in Paris, you could go to the Osmotheque conference to experience vintage chypres in all their glory (I have done so a few times). Unfortunately...

    As for vials, I have no experience, but I'd be suspicious. Vials might be sealed, but they contain oxygen too, and in a higher ratio than in a full bottle. Plus if they are transparent, have been exposed to light and heat, they could degrade easily. My view is that a sealed perfume that has been kept in a box is the best bet. Unfortunately, it's almost never possible to know when that has been the case.

    cacio

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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by cacio View Post
    It's as much about the effect that it has on other materials than the smell per se.
    Pretty much my feeling about oakmoss also.
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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    Oakmoss is like beautifully planed and polished mahogany, uplifting and complementing whatever lights upon it, setting those things off to their best advantage and contributing a special tone or feeling to the whole . . . For me, it is smooth, rich and deep, enveloping but never suffocating.
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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by hednic View Post
    Pretty much my feeling about oakmoss also.
    Generally very much my thoughts about oakmoss also. Playing with Oakmoss I have found that different suppliers most often supply their own variations in flavour, aroma and texture. In general a deep wood, earthy richness provides a base that adds dimension and serves to accentuate the quality of a perfumes other ingredients in a harmonically balanced and natural way. It seems to act similar as mounting a sauce with butter in cooking
    There is also a quality of shaving of rough edges and offering a softly poliished patina attractive. .
    The 80's brought a slough of scents overly enriched in this way. They have a quality of excess that for the time was de rigueur. I would call it a quality akin to an off the rack Brioni suit.
    These days it is a joy to have Indie scents using Full fat Oakmoss with some reawakened finesse.
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    Basenotes Junkie grayspoole's Avatar
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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by Earlyn View Post
    I'd like to hear more from vintage BN experts about oak moss and how that note changes over the life of the juice. The other thread mentions chypres as displaying a marked change. Chypres happen to be some of my favorites so I am especially interested in this.
    As I've said, I have not found the oakmoss to change in my well preserved vintage chypres. I take Cacio's point that it may be the loss of the top notes in a vintage bottle could bring the oakmoss into greater prominence overall, but I don't recall experiencing that myself.

    Quote Originally Posted by Earlyn View Post
    I am having trouble with identifying oak moss and have been getting feelings of rawness and heat in my lungs when sniffing some very vintage perfumes as well as some heavy oak moss non-IFRA current releases. I hope I'm not sensitive because I don't want to have to give up oak moss, but that is another discussion. I do not have a sample of oak moss but plan to obtain one.
    I hope you do not find that you are sensitive to oakmoss, Earlyn but there are so many wonderful perfumes without it, that there's no need for true concern. Oakmoss is handled in so many different ways, in different styles of perfume, and for me, it doesn't generally stand out all that much. (No oakmoss bombs are dropping for me...) Your vintage Coty Chypre and Crepe de Chine should provide an experience of oakmoss as one element in a suble, well blended chypre structure. the oakmoss is a little bit like a drop of soy sauce/umami alongside the tangy bergamot and the sweetness of labdanum. I'm wearing some vintage Mitsouko EDC (1960's-70s) and yes, there's certainly oakmoss here, but I can also tell that the oakmoss note is greatly enchanced by the sweet spices and vanillin. In Mitsouko, the oakmoss feels nutty and brown. Certain vintages of the 1940's celebrate the dry earthiness of oakmoss. Vintage Replique (extrait) smells like peat and the crumbled leaves that pile up around the base of a tree. Vintage green/leather chypres such as Givenchy III, Scherrer 1, Bandit bury the oakmoss in leather (isobutyl quinoline), galbanum, patchouli, sandalwood, etc., etc.so that I hardly notice the oakmoss in these perfumes, since there are so many more assertive notes within the composition.

    Quote Originally Posted by Earlyn View Post
    I've been looking at vintage nips lately...as a way to compare my vintage perfumes with the same version from the sealed tubes. Would it be reasonable to see less of a change in the oak moss in those vials than in a flacon that has had evaporation, etc? Theoretically those samples are supposed to fresher - would it be helpful to me to use them as a general comparison, but also as a way to have more awareness of the oak moss?
    Vintage nips are oodles of fun. I believe the contents in nips are very well preserved. There's a tiny bubble of vintage air trapped within, but I don't think it affects the perfume. I have compared vintage nips of Lelong's Indiscret, Schiaparelli Shocking, and Lanvin My Sin to vintage bottles of these perfumes and I found them to be more or less the same. You can find many unusual vintages in the form of nips, but I think the best way to familiarize yourself with the smell of oakmoss is to order some straight up.
    Currently wearing: Métal by Paco Rabanne

  8. #8

    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by grayspoole View Post
    As I've said, I have not found the oakmoss to change in my well preserved vintage chypres. I take Cacio's point that it may be the loss of the top notes in a vintage bottle could bring the oakmoss into greater prominence overall, but I don't recall experiencing that myself.



    I hope you do not find that you are sensitive to oakmoss, Earlyn but there are so many wonderful perfumes without it, that there's no need for true concern. Oakmoss is handled in so many different ways, in different styles of perfume, and for me, it doesn't generally stand out all that much. (No oakmoss bombs are dropping for me...) Your vintage Coty Chypre and Crepe de Chine should provide an experience of oakmoss as one element in a suble, well blended chypre structure. the oakmoss is a little bit like a drop of soy sauce/umami alongside the tangy bergamot and the sweetness of labdanum. I'm wearing some vintage Mitsouko EDC (1960's-70s) and yes, there's certainly oakmoss here, but I can also tell that the oakmoss note is greatly enchanced by the sweet spices and vanillin. In Mitsouko, the oakmoss feels nutty and brown. Certain vintages of the 1940's celebrate the dry earthiness of oakmoss. Vintage Replique (extrait) smells like peat and the crumbled leaves that pile up around the base of a tree. Vintage green/leather chypres such as Givenchy III, Scherrer 1, Bandit bury the oakmoss in leather (isobutyl quinoline), galbanum, patchouli, sandalwood, etc., etc.so that I hardly notice the oakmoss in these perfumes, since there are so many more assertive notes within the composition.



    Vintage nips are oodles of fun. I believe the contents in nips are very well preserved. There's a tiny bubble of vintage air trapped within, but I don't think it affects the perfume. I have compared vintage nips of Lelong's Indiscret, Schiaparelli Shocking, and Lanvin My Sin to vintage bottles of these perfumes and I found them to be more or less the same. You can find many unusual vintages in the form of nips, but I think the best way to familiarize yourself with the smell of oakmoss is to order some straight up.
    Thanks for your very informative post, grayspoole! I appreciate you describing the character of oak moss you’ve experienced in your different vintage perfumes. Interesting you should mention vintage Replique. I just received some two days ago (1960 vs. 1940), and am recognizing the peaty smell you are describing. I’m getting from some of your descriptions that some of the oakmoss character may be identified through a kind of process of elimination, where it plays a supporting roIe and modifier of other notes, but in alll cases expresses a brown earthiness.
    I also receive a small box of nips yesterday in very nice shape with the idea of comparison and am glad to hear your experience has been that they are very similar to vintage bottles. Haven’t decided if I’m going to just pop them all open or wait till I have a comparison for each as there are some that I am not likely to have in larger quantities than nips in the near future.
    The oakmoss is on order! -so I’m looking forward to experiencing the note and hoping that any heat in my chest is just from me being too overzealous in my vintage perfume use on occasion.
    ”I want all the perfumes”
    Currently wearing: Insolent by Millot

  9. #9

    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    IOakmoss is like beautifully planed and polished mahogany, uplifting and complementing whatever lights upon it, setting those things off to their best advantage and contributing a special tone or feeling to the whole..
    That’s a lovely description and a good thing to think about when seeking that note.

    Quote Originally Posted by cacio View Post
    IVintage perfumes contain many ingredients and I don't think it's oakmoss that is problematic. Typically, the ingredients that turn first are the more volatile ones, like citrus and aldehydes. They turn into varnish, or into something that feels like burnt or cooked. And all chypres have bergamot, and often also aldehydes added. but of course one could well be sensitive to oakmoss or other materials.
    Good point about the other materials.
    ”I want all the perfumes”
    Currently wearing: Insolent by Millot

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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by Earlyn View Post
    Interesting you should mention vintage Replique. I just received some two days ago (1960 vs. 1940), and am recognizing the peaty smell you are describing.
    The original Replique is such an interesting scent, a dry woody chypre centered on oakmoss. It is about as far from a modern feminine gourmand/fruitchouli as it is possible to go. What formulation did you get? The vintage EDT is good but the parfum is very rich and elegant.

    Quote Originally Posted by Earlyn View Post
    I also receive a small box of nips yesterday in very nice shape with the idea of comparison and am glad to hear your experience has been that they are very similar to vintage bottles. Haven’t decided if I’m going to just pop them all open or wait till I have a comparison for each as there are some that I am not likely to have in larger quantities than nips in the near future.
    Nips offer great opportunities to discover forgotten vintages. I can usually tell if a vintage perfume that I have bought blind is in good condition and smells as it should, so I don't usually seek out nips for comparison. If you do this, it is sometimes important to know what formulation was used to fill the nip (and there is often no way to tell). The My Sin nips that I have contain the vintage cologne, which really is very different (and not nearly as good IMHO) as vintage My Sin parfum.

    I always take careful notes as I test a nip, because you never know when you may have something worth seeking out in a larger bottle. I have a lot of individual nips that I haven't managed to try yet. Looking at my "nip notes," I see that I first tested Evening in Paris from a nip. I had forgotten this, I had very low expectations, given the ubiquity of EiP in drugstores and the Tom Waits song, but that nip of EiP was such a pleasant surprise that I did seek out a bottle. I thought Mary Chess White Lilac was an outstanding lilac perfume, based on a nip test, and Tussy Midnight (1950) was a good feminine woods. I've tested nips of the various colors of "Satin" perfumes issued by Angelique, a somewhat trashy 1950's brand created by two mad men. There's an entertaining blogpost about Angelique here, which reprints a 1950 Life piece on the company and its founders:

    https://bgirlrhapsody.wordpress.com/...f-los-angeles/

    Despite all of the shenanigans, I thought Gold Satin (1958) was an excellent, opulent floriental, a little like BaV.

    I need to crack open some new nips to see what I find.
    Currently wearing: Métal by Paco Rabanne

  11. #11

    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    I love oakmoss and use it extensively in my own compositions. It’s a remarkable material.

    Without cross-quoting from the reference thread, I’ll just say that Grayspoole’s comments on oakmoss sum the material up extremely well for me. Oakmoss in a blend is as much about the effect as it is about the scent of oakmoss itself. I believe that’s why so many “oakmoss” perfumes vary so widely, as it forms a significant part of the structure, rather than the finished ‘picture’. It’s difficult to identify unless you have access to the material in isolation, in different formats and dilutions, to study. What is often identified as “oakmoss” I suspect is the effect, rather than the material itself.

    When added to a composition, oakmoss adds texture, depth, effect and longevity, as well as a beautiful interplay with everything from florals to leathers. It’s extremely versatile in that sense. Depending on the format (the absolute is really quite different to EO, for example!) and dilution (it’s potent, and behaves quite differently at different concentrations), it adds a ‘wetness’, leatheriness, earthiness, smokiness, or brown/greenness to a perfume. It can be dank and musky, wet/green, earthy/dry, leathery/smoky, or any combination of these, depending on which facets you play up with the other elements.

    As such, it can be hard to isolate the actual scent of the oakmoss itself in a finished perfume. That’s not to say that it’s hard to recognize the effect though; the impact on a blend is so specific to the material that I’d go so far as to say the presence of oakmoss in a perfume is very easy to identify if you’ve experienced it. Perhaps it’s easier to explain this way: while Mitsouko is for many a “reference” oakmoss scent, I’d say that, to my nose at least, it doesn’t actually smell of oakmoss. The mossy effect is intense, so it’s a great reference in that regard, but it’s the other elements that give Mitsouko her particular character. It’s not so much an oakmoss scent, as it is a wonderful example of what oakmoss does to a perfume.

    All of this to say, I haven’t experienced significant degradation of oakmoss in any of the vintages I own. On the contrary, I’ve found it to be a material that ages well. I would posit that the experience described in the reference thread is to do with the aging of the perfume overall, rather than a phenomenon specific to the oakmoss.

    Specifically to address the aging of vintage Chypres (my favourite!), I’ll add that Chypres are usually built around a core structure of cistus/labdanum, oakmoss and citruses (commonly bergamot). Of these, the first two are heavier materials, more commonly associated with bases, and they age well. Citruses, on the other hand, are one of the more volatile classes of materials and can degrade significantly, or evaporate entirely, through the aging process. Ultimately, if the way a Chypre ages over the years (or even decades) results in something you don’t enjoy as much, this is an absolutely valid thing to recognize - it all helps narrow down which vintages to chase!

    Again, just my thoughts based on how I perceive and experience the material. Perception is highly subjective, after all!
    Chypreish”:
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    "Today, she was feeling chypreish”

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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by grayspoole View Post

    There's an entertaining blogpost about Angelique here, which reprints a 1950 Life piece on the company and its founders:

    https://bgirlrhapsody.wordpress.com/...f-los-angeles/
    That article was hilarious. I would love to have known those wacky guys. Can you imagine the kind of uproar that would ensue today if someone tried to perfume-bomb an entire city? Or employ a bubble machine that sent perfumes out into the city streets?

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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Thanks for sharing this. What characters!

    Couldn’t help but notice this quote:
    “From Milwaukee a victim of asthma wrote that she was praying nightly that Swartout and Granville would never appear since she was allergic to perfume, and the idea of a perfumed blizzard was “terribly upsetting.””
    I think it’s the first time I’ve seen a perfume allergy referenced in a historical piece. I can only imagine the response to some of these publicity stunts today...
    Chypreish”:
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    (of a person or expression) to be desirous of an abundance of chypre.
    "Today, she was feeling chypreish”

  14. #14

    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by grayspoole View Post
    Vintage Replique (extrait) smells like peat and the crumbled leaves that pile up around the base of a tree.
    I'll have to try and detect this next time. What I thought was oakmoss is probably clary sage, which I find wonderful with the sunny lemon and spices.

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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by Lellabelle View Post
    I love oakmoss and use it extensively in my own compositions. It’s a remarkable material.
    Thanks for adding your valuable insights, Lellabelle. I'd love to know more about your own perfumes. Are you making these just for yourself?
    Currently wearing: Métal by Paco Rabanne

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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by grayspoole View Post
    Vintage Replique (extrait) smells like peat and the crumbled leaves that pile up around the base of a tree
    Quote Originally Posted by Couronne de Violette View Post
    I'll have to try and detect this next time. What I thought was oakmoss is probably clary sage, which I find wonderful with the sunny lemon and spices.
    I would bet it's both. Next time I wear Replique, I will try to find the sage.
    Currently wearing: Métal by Paco Rabanne

  17. #17

    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by grayspoole View Post
    I would bet it's both. Next time I wear Replique, I will try to find the sage.
    We could do a synchronized testing . I’m in!
    Chypreish”:
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    "Today, she was feeling chypreish”

  18. #18

    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by grayspoole View Post
    Thanks for adding your valuable insights, Lellabelle. I'd love to know more about your own perfumes. Are you making these just for yourself?
    It’s a passion of mine, and most of what I make is for myself, as well as for family and friends . I make a small number for sale too, but on such a small scale that I’m pretty much invisible! Most of what I make is by request and usually only covers the cost of materials used. Mainly, I do it for enjoyment; I’m a hobbyist with a little training and some really good materials . I love vintage styled perfumes, and a lot of what I make falls into this style. My preference is to work with naturals (no judgement on synthetics here, this is just what works for my style and preferences).

    Honestly, the industry is focussed so differently from what I enjoy that I haven’t felt too inclined to try to sell more. What it takes to sell now is not something I am interested in, or that I feel I could compete in, even if I wanted to. I’m a private person, and the thought of instagramming and using influencers to sell perfume fills me with a cold dread!
    Chypreish”:
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    "Today, she was feeling chypreish”

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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by Lellabelle View Post
    It’s a passion of mine, and most of what I make is for myself, as well as for family and friends . I make a small number for sale too, but on such a small scale that I’m pretty much invisible! Most of what I make is by request and usually only covers the cost of materials used. Mainly, I do it for enjoyment; I’m a hobbyist with a little training and some really good materials . I love vintage styled perfumes, and a lot of what I make falls into this style. My preference is to work with naturals (no judgement on synthetics here, this is just what works for my style and preferences).

    Honestly, the industry is focussed so differently from what I enjoy that I haven’t felt too inclined to try to sell more.
    This is my favorite line that I haven't tried.

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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bavard View Post
    This is my favorite line that I haven't tried.
    Indeed!
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  21. #21

    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by grayspoole View Post
    The original Replique is such an interesting scent, a dry woody chypre centered on oakmoss. It is about as far from a modern feminine gourmand/fruitchouli as it is possible to go. What formulation did you get? The vintage EDT is good but the parfum is very rich and elegant.
    Mine is perfume - 1960-65 judging from the box, stopper, and label. Unfortunately even though box had sealed cellophane and bottle had paper and cord intact, there was old leakage evidenced in the tissue paper inside of box and a fair amount of loss. The juice seems in good condition though.

    Quote Originally Posted by grayspoole View Post
    Nips offer great opportunities to discover forgotten vintages. If you do this, it is sometimes important to know what formulation was used to fill the nip (and there is often no way to tell). The My Sin nips that I have contain the vintage cologne, which really is very different (and not nearly as good IMHO) as vintage My Sin parfum.
    Yes, never had a problem warming up to the vintage My Sin perfume. Thankfully I think I'm now able to at least get if a perfume has gone off, vs. just lost the top without any other reference. I've looked for hints to the age and formulation with nips - some say flat out they are colognes. One that I'm wanting to get ahold of is Blue Carnation, not only because I'd like to try it, but I believe it's inclusion in a set along with some others would indicate an older bunch. I'll look for the others fragrances you mentioned that were a pleasant surprise in your testing. Cleopatra's Boudoir has a nice article with color menu for nips and info about dating that I'm sure you have seen

    Quote Originally Posted by grayspoole View Post
    There's an entertaining blogpost about Angelique here, which reprints a 1950 Life piece on the company and its founders:

    https://bgirlrhapsody.wordpress.com/...f-los-angeles/
    Hilarious article. Like when they are brainstorming scent names "Steeple - it smells to high heaven"
    ”I want all the perfumes”
    Currently wearing: Insolent by Millot

  22. #22

    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by Lellabelle View Post
    I love oakmoss and use it extensively in my own compositions. It’s a remarkable material.
    Loved reading your insights on oak moss and your experience in using it in your own perfumes, as well as your observations in vintages and how oak moss presents as those perfumes age. You mention personal preferences and I definitely can say that I crave vintage and vintage style chypres. (Love your signature BTW)

    I'd like to hear about your perfumes - what you like to work on and what your influences are, how you get inspired. Seems that you love the art of making for it's own sake, something that is likely reflected in your work.


    Quote Originally Posted by Lellabelle View Post
    We could do a synchronized testing . I’m in!
    Yes, a synchronized testing of Replique would be great! I would love to read impressions from those that have a good base of comparison.
    ”I want all the perfumes”
    Currently wearing: Insolent by Millot

  23. #23

    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bavard View Post
    This is my favorite line that I haven't tried.
    Quote Originally Posted by purecaramel View Post
    Indeed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Earlyn View Post
    Loved reading your insights on oak moss and your experience in using it in your own perfumes, as well as your observations in vintages and how oak moss presents as those perfumes age. You mention personal preferences and I definitely can say that I crave vintage and vintage style chypres. (Love your signature BTW)

    I'd like to hear about your perfumes - what you like to work on and what your influences are, how you get inspired. Seems that you love the art of making for it's own sake, something that is likely reflected in your work.
    Thank you all for the words of encouragement. This group is so kind, and so supportive of our shared passions! I really should step out of my comfort zone a little and share a few of these for evaluation. I could probably round up a few samples, if anyone is really interested? This is such a knowledgeable and passionate group, I’d be happy to hear your thoughts and constructive feedback. PM me if you’d like and I’ll see if I have anything you might enjoy, or if you’d like a sample of a future project. No obligation, of course. If everyone interested in perfume was as wonderful as this group, then sharing it with the world would be a joy. (I hope this isn’t against any Basenotes rules, and am certainly not trying to solicit sales, in case this needs any clarification!).

    Earlyn, as for what I like to work on, and my influences, they vary quite a lot. As I mentioned, I work with all natural materials, so that imposes both some limits, and opens up some possibilities. An all-natural will never have the staying power of a synthetic palette, for example, but the richness and depth, as well as the evolution you can get from naturals makes up for this for me. I try not to be too constrained by structure and build what smells good: usually your materials will dictate how you can use them and what your structure needs to be. I have a few interesting (or rare) things to play with, and make my own tinctures as well when the inspiration takes. None of this is remotely compatible with IFRA of course!

    If I’m creating for myself, my influences are usually anchored in very specific memories, or experiences. I adore chypres, so this is an area I play around with quite often. I have one I made in memory of my mother after she passed: both as a tribute, and a connection to her memory. Her signature perfume was Femme, and so it has some of the dirty elements in common with this, but with a tart, dark, blackcurrant bud in place of Femme’s plum. I actually wish I’d made it for her earlier, as I think she’d have loved it.

    Others are based on places I have a connection to, and the smells that transport me there, like my “Celtic Moss” which was inspired by cold wet hikes in the boggy Scottish highlands in my childhood, or one which I built around the very specific smell of our cabin in the woods (it’s a tiny round-log, in a forest in the middle of nowhere). The stronger the image, the better the end result, usually.

    I’m proudest of the ones I’ve made for loved ones. Creating for someone else is a really wonderful experience, and can change your assumptions about certain combinations of materials. I made a custom perfume for my husband that came out really well (of course, he loved all the most expensive things in my organ!). He loves rose, while it can be a really challenging note for me, so working with this as a central note was an interesting experience. It greatly improved my critical ability to evaluate the various rose materials available. I’d have to go back and check my formula notes for this one, but I remember it featured a particularly lovely Frankincense and Bulgarian Rose Otto, with Labdanum, tobacco and Sandalwood, as well as a rather nice Haitian Vetiver and a few other things, to take it out of territory more usually associated with a Sultan’s boudoir . Occasionally I play with more abstract concepts. These are more hit and miss, but there’s always something to be learned.

    That’s probably more info than anyone wanted (and I have no desire to hijack the thread), but I wanted to thank you all for the kind words and vote of confidence. You’re right that I create for enjoyment, and it gives me great pleasure to be able to share my love of scent with others similarly inclined. A life without smell would be half a life.
    Chypreish”:
    /ˈSHēpRAiSH/
    adjective
    (of a person or expression) to be desirous of an abundance of chypre.
    "Today, she was feeling chypreish”

  24. #24

    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by Earlyn View Post
    Yes, a synchronized testing of Replique would be great! I would love to read impressions from those that have a good base of comparison.
    Here’s my little bottle of parfum. I’m not quite sure of its age or history, but it was old enough to be of interest and seems quite well preserved. I don’t have any other examples to compare it to, though would be happy to sync up and explore!37658F76-30E7-498C-8D90-8BB496754B6E.jpg
    Oh my goodness, this picture is enormous! My little bottle is tiny; this makes is look positively large enough to bathe in.
    (Sorry, I thought I’d fixed the photo size, but it seems to vary depending on the size of ads displayed).
    Last edited by Lellabelle; 20th July 2019 at 01:58 AM. Reason: Corrected photo size
    Chypreish”:
    /ˈSHēpRAiSH/
    adjective
    (of a person or expression) to be desirous of an abundance of chypre.
    "Today, she was feeling chypreish”

  25. #25
    Wearing Perfume Right Now
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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by Lellabelle View Post
    I could probably round up a few samples, if anyone is really interested?
    I'm interested.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bavard View Post
    I'm interested.
    Ditto.
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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by Lellabelle View Post
    We could do a synchronized testing . I’m in!
    Quote Originally Posted by Earlyn View Post
    Yes, a synchronized testing of Replique would be great! I would love to read impressions from those that have a good base of comparison.
    Let's do it! How about this Monday?
    Currently wearing: Métal by Paco Rabanne

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Lellabelle-

    I'm thrilled that our discussion of oakmoss has allowed us to learn more about your perfume compositions. Of course, I would love to try anything you wish to share.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lellabelle View Post
    I’m proudest of the ones I’ve made for loved ones. Creating for someone else is a really wonderful experience, and can change your assumptions about certain combinations of materials.
    This observation about a personal, rather than general, creative/design process is quite fascinating. Given that many industry perfumers say that excessive market testing eliminates innovative concepts, perhaps all perfumes should just be designed with a specific loved one in mind.
    Currently wearing: Métal by Paco Rabanne

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bavard View Post
    I'm interested.
    Quote Originally Posted by purecaramel View Post
    Ditto.
    Double ditto
    Beauty needs no morality or righteousness.
    It, like nature, does not give a shit
    Currently wearing: Seaward by Herbalife

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Oakmoss in vintage perfume including deep vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by epapsiou View Post
    Double ditto
    Triple dipple ditto
    oh look, I have a signature




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