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  1. #1
    Basenotes Junkie oudaddict's Avatar
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    Default Why do Roses Smell so Sweet?


  2. #2

    Default Re: Why do Roses Smell so Sweet?

    Nice explanation on chirality / isomers, but sort of misleading because rose is so much more than rose oxide... Thinking PEA, geraniol, citronellol, nerol, eugenol, damascenone/beta damascone, etc.


  3. #3

    Default Re: Why do Roses Smell so Sweet?

    Also, I don't find rose oxide sweet at all, though that could be idiosyncratic, there are many things others call sweet that I don't perceive that way. But L-rose oxide doesn't seem even in the ballpark of sweetness.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Why do Roses Smell so Sweet?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Roberts View Post
    Also, I don't find rose oxide sweet at all, though that could be idiosyncratic, there are many things others call sweet that I don't perceive that way. But L-rose oxide doesn't seem even in the ballpark of sweetness.
    100% with you on that. Rose oxide laevo is useful in creating a sense of the metallic but I would never say it was sweet. The damascones contribute far more in that area.

  5. #5
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    Default

    I love beta-damascone. To me it smells like plums and dried fruits, slight coumarin and suede.
    And when I smell it, it radiates a dark plum-wine sweetness...but this sweetness flickers, off and on.
    Unlike vanillin, it isn`t a constant.

    One thing I notice about beta-damascone is that it is very dense. tightly packed. complex.
    Like a (some) leather accords - for example. A thick material with all sorts of nuances, there to be explored.

    I`d like "open up," beta-damascone
    The first thing that pops in my mind it to use galaxolide, or some other semi-transparent material.
    Or perhaps I could use some citrus top notes?
    To help "open up," beta-damascone.
    Does this idea of "opening up," at all make sense?

    Do you have any recommendations for "opening up," beta-damascone?
    I hope my question isn`t too off the wall?

    Thanks so much for your time.
    Matthew

  6. #6

    Default Re: Why do Roses Smell so Sweet?

    Quote Originally Posted by jfrater View Post
    100% with you on that. Rose oxide laevo is useful in creating a sense of the metallic but I would never say it was sweet. The damascones contribute far more in that area.
    I agree with both of you here, it def is not sweet. I would love to source some L-Rose oxide to sample it, I only have the racemic.





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