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  1. #1

    Default What "propellant gas" really is?

    Excuse my poor physics(chemistry?) knowledge.
    I notice some vintage perfume atomizer, especially those of Rochas, with a quite confusing capacity, such as "17g-15ml(7.5ml parfum pur + prop.)"
    693549247.jpg

    I guess it means that the atomizer contains only 7.5 ml pure perfume, and the rest of it is the volume of propellant gas.
    But what confuses me is the concept of net weight. Please see the pictures below.

    i-img480x480-15706760927rfqv9184.jpg
    i-img480x480-15706760929mvnnq184.jpg

    It is written that the "NET WT." of the product is 15g. This challenges my understanding. So "net weight" actually means the total weight of perfume liquid and propellant gas, doesn't it?

    Since I can't see anything in it, who can kindly tell me where propellant gas is and what it likes? (sorry for this stupid question T-T)

  2. #2
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    Default Re: What "propellant gas" really is?

    Net weight is the actual weight or liquid quantity of the product only.
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  3. #3

    Default Re: What "propellant gas" really is?

    Thank you. So it contains 7.5ml (but 15g) perfume liquid?

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    Default Re: What "propellant gas" really is?

    That is some confusing labeling.

    It doesn't make sense to me.

    Ah - It's not as bad as I first thought (I had seen the same bottle labeled as 15 g and 17 g, and got a "does not compute" error).

    In that case, the bottles are just as labeled - Rochas measured the volume of perfume - which includes ethanol, I believe, and they measured the weight of the final solution with propellant. The propellant can be a liquid under slight pressure that evaporates with gusto when the pressure is released, carrying perfume with it.

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    Default Re: What "propellant gas" really is?

    Expecting Epapsiou in 3...2...1....

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    Default Re: What "propellant gas" really is?

    Other should chime in, but my understanding is that net weight is the weight of perfume + propellant. If the volume of the perfume is 7.5ml, its weight should also be in that neighborhood.

    You'd be surprised by how fast the content of the bottle moves down when you spray-so indeed I am not surprised that the propellant accounts for so much of volume and weight.

    cacio

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    Default Re: What "propellant gas" really is?

    double post
    Last edited by cacio; 8th November 2019 at 07:05 PM.

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    Default Re: What "propellant gas" really is?

    I see why OP is a bit perplexed. So here is an explanation

    The spray bottles back then were pressurized and filled with a propellant gas which turned liquid under pressure. So what you see in your bottle is 7.5ml of perfume oil and 7.5ml of liquified gas (probably butane).
    When you press the sprayer head to let stuff out, the liquified gas (now under less pressure) expands into gas and comes out with force, aerosoling the perfume oil onto you (and making you cold cause this process lowers the temperature of expanded gas)
    Current can of Axe deo works in a similar way.

    The other issue here is the units. So 7.5ml+7.5ml = 15ml should make sense to you. The confusing part is 17 grams.
    Note that 1gm is not same a 1ml (except for water). One is unit of weight and other volume. So 15 ml can weigh 17 gm (or 7 or 70 depending on density)
    Only idiots use same units for both (for example: folks who use ounces) and one of those idiots must have made the label on the bottom of the bottle.
    The fluid inside bottle is 15ml and weighs 17gms.

    Oh and a great buy you have here. Enjoy it.
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    Default Re: What "propellant gas" really is?

    ...
    Beauty needs no morality or righteousness.
    It, like nature, does not give a shit

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    Default Re: What "propellant gas" really is?

    For your information, many maufacturers were using butane, and not inert gas, as propellant , when these atomizers were introduced. Recommendations ( no storage above 50°C, no spray near a flame) were clearly labelled on the boxes .
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    Default Re: What "propellant gas" really is?

    Thanks for the explanations.
    Alcohol + butane + under pressure... I can see why airlines didn't want that stuff on planes.

    cacio

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    Default Re: What "propellant gas" really is?

    i don't think colognes with atomiseur pressurized gas are any good for vintage collectors, i never have problems with colognes going bad even with 60 - 70 years old bottles.
    but i have 2 atomiseur pressurized gas bottles colognes portos balenciaga and original piere cardin they both start to smell after years exactly the same bland smell.
    1976 - Yatagan Caron
    1977 - Snuff by Schiaparelli
    1981 - Kouros YSL
    1988 - Fahrenheit Dior
    1980 - Patou Pour Homme
    1987 - Lapidus Pour Homme
    1981 - Quorum Antonio Puig
    1993 - Insense by Givenchy
    2014 - Dior Homme Parfum
    1987 - Ho Hang Club Balenciaga

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    Default What "propellant gas" really is?

    Quote Originally Posted by peter4ptv View Post
    i don't think colognes with atomiseur pressurized gas are any good for vintage collectors, i never have problems with colognes going bad even with 60 - 70 years old bottles.
    but i have 2 atomiseur pressurized gas bottles colognes portos balenciaga and original piere cardin they both start to smell after years exactly the same bland smell.
    I’ve experienced that as well.
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    Default Re: What "propellant gas" really is?

    Quote Originally Posted by Diddy View Post
    I’ve experienced that as well.
    My guess is somehow they get affected by the gas if don’t use the whole bottle like the most regular person will do in a year or two.
    My bottles were purchased brand new like at lest 20 years ago and are total garbage now
    I am glad the don’t make them any more. I go get splshess from lithe 30s and they are still very nice and inacti
    1976 - Yatagan Caron
    1977 - Snuff by Schiaparelli
    1981 - Kouros YSL
    1988 - Fahrenheit Dior
    1980 - Patou Pour Homme
    1987 - Lapidus Pour Homme
    1981 - Quorum Antonio Puig
    1993 - Insense by Givenchy
    2014 - Dior Homme Parfum
    1987 - Ho Hang Club Balenciaga

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    Default Re: What "propellant gas" really is?

    Quote Originally Posted by peter4ptv View Post
    i don't think colognes with atomiseur pressurized gas are any good for vintage collectors, i never have problems with colognes going bad even with 60 - 70 years old bottles.
    but i have 2 atomiseur pressurized gas bottles colognes portos balenciaga and original piere cardin they both start to smell after years exactly the same bland smell.
    I got the problem with some vintage Carven but , on the contrary, I am wearing today Paco Rabanne pour Homme (pressurized bottle) and it's absolutely perfect. It may depend of the propellant used .Contact between fragrance and propellant is so intimate that there may be some interaction with time ...
    Currently wearing: Versace l'Homme by Versace

  16. #16

    Default Re: What "propellant gas" really is?

    Thanks everyone for all the reply
    Now I understand that the liquid I see may be a mixture of perfume liquid and gas (or liquefied gas).
    And I seem to understand why propellant type atomizers always look larger and contain more liquid than non-propellant type.
    Thanks again! m(_ _)m




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