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  1. #121
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Quote Originally Posted by Earlyn View Post
    AM - Oh this is nice and green like I like it - sort of like Private Collection, and the flowers are balanced in the middle by the green that is shot through. I love my florals when they have the stems and leaves too. There’s a warmth similar to Givenchy lll that comes in briefly and after a while it gets slightly sweeter and plainly floral. Later I’m getting musky sweetness and light florals, green gone. Florals fade and musk stays, eventually there is a slight underpinning of sandalwood

    Time for a hot bath.

    PM - Reapply Scherrer - wait, What?! Is this the same fragrance? Checks bottle. Yes, but now it is not green - big sweet florals (SweetTarts), tuberose, not particularly indolic florals, not green florals, jasmine, almost tropical flowers but sweet and dry/puckery at the same time. Eventually it goes through the same very late middle and drydown as the AM wear.
    Ah-ha. The AM wear sounds like the one I've read about. The PM wear sounds like the one I had. One of the BN reviewers noted that Scherrer was too mercurial to get a thumbs-up rating. Perhaps this is what they meant.

    Looking forward to Al(l)iage!

  2. #122
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Quote Originally Posted by PStoller View Post
    I don't have a perfume reference for it. It just reminds me of laundry detergent (or, perhaps more accurately, dryer sheets) in a generic way. It's what I get left with in the drydown, rather than something I experience as such in the earlier phases. It's not unpleasant; it just doesn't wear especially well on me
    Your probationary period is over, PStoller.

    I used to get way more dryer sheet smells than I get now. I've mentioned them over the years. And I often get nice, clean, dry laundry from Frederic Malle bases (one of my favorite laundry musks). The main thing I get now, as in Gengis Khan, is a laundry detergent effect, pretty fresh laundry when it still has some projection. The main reference, in my mind, is Chanel Coco. Like Coco, I love the early stages of Sherrer.

    Antaeus Sport has some laundry musk, I think, a light touch. Antaeus does not have it.

    They make me extra excited about the openings of fragrances, historically, but less excited with the bases. I've mostly gone off Coco at this point.

  3. #123
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Quote Originally Posted by Bavard View Post
    Your probationary period is over, PStoller.
    I’m not clear on whether this is congratulatory or a reprimand.

  4. #124
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Sample 12 of 26 is Estee Lauder Aliage. I like the opening. It has lots of notes and complexity. This is familiar.

    There's a minty type of ingredient, almost like a spearmint. With the woods, it's super delish, like a perfect lamb stew with a centimeter of fresh chopped herbs on top.

    The overall effect is impressive. In flashes, the woods stick out to me as grainy, or something hints at harshness, but then when I smell it up close, it seems to resolve into a lovely warmth again, especially nice for the first half hour, moving. It smells fresh and healthy, woody - a broad woods smell, and herbal.

    With its brazen character, it reminds me of Yatagan. They put themselves about, but not at a high pitch. Not screechy, herbal and delicious, but insistent.

    Although it has some fun character, Aliage is still fairly mainstream-smelling women's perfume (and Yatagan is still fairly mainstream-smelling men's perfume).

    This seems really well done to me. An artistic success. An A for the perfumer and the whole team.

    I'm getting some nice, sweet flowers as it develops.

    Quote Originally Posted by PStoller View Post
    I’m not clear on whether this is congratulatory or a reprimand.
    Graduation stuff like that's always congratulatory, I'm pretty sure. Certainly in this case. I've taken to just quoting you for my smelling notes now. I do it with LiveJazz all the time.

    Aliage is getting a leathery aspect heading into the base, reminding me briefly of Diorling.

  5. #125

    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Quote Originally Posted by Bavard View Post
    They make me extra excited about the openings of fragrances, historically, but less excited with the bases. I've mostly gone off Coco at this point.
    Interesting. Do you mean the musks are exalting the opening materials? How might I recognize the effect if so? You mention Coco - other example fragrances come to mind?
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  6. #126
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Quote Originally Posted by Earlyn View Post
    Interesting. Do you mean the musks are exalting the opening materials? How might I recognize the effect if so? You mention Coco - other example fragrances come to mind?
    I think so, or I like the laundry musks themselves in the opening. It can be like a magic that wears off - not the end of the world, and not even necessarily a problem, just that some other styles can get even better with time.

    Nicole Miller has a little laundry musk. The new Chanel, 1957, is loaded with a variety of them. Roja Dove Beguiled Femme starts out nice and turns too much to laundry musks. I think Portrait of a Lady has a laundry musk base (and some fun WACs!).

    A good laundry musk smells luxurious and expensive.

  7. #127

    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Quote Originally Posted by Earlyn View Post
    AM - Oh this is nice and green like I like it - sort of like Private Collection, and the flowers are balanced in the middle by the green that is shot through. I love my florals when they have the stems and leaves too. There’s a warmth similar to Givenchy lll that comes in briefly and after a while it gets slightly sweeter and plainly floral. Later I’m getting musky sweetness and light florals, green gone. Florals fade and musk stays, eventually there is a slight underpinning of sandalwood

    Time for a hot bath.

    PM - Reapply Scherrer - wait, What?! Is this the same fragrance? Checks bottle. Yes, but now it is not green - big sweet florals (SweetTarts), tuberose, not particularly indolic florals, not green florals, jasmine, almost tropical flowers but sweet and dry/puckery at the same time. Eventually it goes through the same very late middle and drydown as the AM wear.

    The second wearing florals reminded me of My Sin so I put some up against it but My Sin smells pretty filthy next to Scherrer and not so fruitish or dry/puckery. The floral presence is similarly powerful in both during my second wearing.

    ...

    My combined wearing notes - I really enjoyed the greenness of Private Collection in the AM and the warm translucent Givenchy lll moment which must have been due to hyacinth. I did like grandness of the PM flowers, but not so much their tropical sweetness however interesting that dry pucker was, and so preferred the less sweet version in the AM. I don’t think I’ve got a handle on laundry vs.other musks so I can’t call that out here, but the dry down in both wearings did smell of musk and sandalwood of a bright and light variety. The sandalwood was very nice, not as prominent as that in Samsara PDT but was a similar feel to the wood to me.
    I sampled Scherrer last night and am wearing it again today, and I'm really relating to these notes. I'm not going to be any good at pulling out the specific florals, except maybe the violet and a light powdery orris. Lots of galbanum, and the cassie jumps out.

    The reference that comes to mind for me is Hermes Amazone, particularly in relation to the tart/puckery "tropical" note. I assumed it was related to the cassie note, which Amazone shares. It reminds me of a tart, bitter, bracing cordial. This element bothered me in Amazone, where it feels overwhelming to me, but it seems more offset here with, as you note, big green florals a la Givenchy III, and (perhaps more importantly) a winking bit of unwashed humanity.

    I do get the laundry sheets/soap accord that Bavard and PStoller are discussing, but they're used well as fixatives and don't bother me, and they suit the overall effect. Sheets that were freshly laundered last night, and then slept in - possibly more than slept in - by someone wearing a nice green floral cyphre.

    There is also a note or accord I'm associating with old school hairspray (the pleasant smell of the dried spray on hair, not the harsh blast out of the can). I believe my maternal grandmother's bathroom smelled something like this...the afterglow of hairspray, nice soaps, some lingering perfume, and the general smell of a fairly clean but not spotless tile bathroom. It's a nice memory and a nice smell.

    The deep base remains very bracing, almost pure oakmoss and vetiver to my nose, with a little hit of musky warmth. If there is sandalwood, it's light and of the soapy/sharp semi-incensey variety.

    Big thumbs up, love it.
    "It's not what you look like when you're doing what you're doing; it's what you're doing when you're doing what you look like you're doing."
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  8. #128
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Like many who've reviewed Aliage, I raise an eyebrow at the notion that it's a "sport fragrance." No doubt the dominant fresh green notes and tomboyish structure earned it that sobriquet, but it's certainly not a sport fragrance as we've come to know it. Which, for me, is just as well.

    Still, I find Aliage a bit of a mixed bag. Most of the heart (including some subtle tobacco that isn't in the pyramid) and all of the base, I really like. But, there's a bright, borderline cloying note that keeps this from being a love. I think it's the peach, which has never been a favorite of mine. (I've never liked stone fruit as food, either.) I can't be sure, though, that it isn't a little too much galbanum, since I'm not yet certain how to identify it; or maybe it's the interaction of the two. It's the only thing that makes me feel this otherwise unisex fragrance leans feminine, though I can't say it's a scent I would like on a woman, either. Anyway, once that fades, I'm a considerably happier camper, though even then it's a tad fresher than I prefer.

    Hey, maybe it's a sport fragrance, after all.

  9. #129

    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Aliage. I've always been curious to try this one. It's impossible for me to talk about it without leaning heavily into Aramis Devin, which I've smelled extensively, used to own, and never could love. Same company, same structure, same time period. Lauder is famous for creating feminine/masculine "twins", which is so much fun to think about. And true to reputation, Aliage is exceptionally similar to Devin. Along similar lines, Azuree resolves the disconnects I have with Aramis, so I had high hopes for the Aliage/Devin duo.

    Close, but not quite, after this first sampling. Devin is an austere vegetal galbanum, pine and leather beast. It is aggressive, bitter, salty, confrontational. The leather is sharp. I'd always been fascinated by the stuff, but found it unwearable. Aliage's bones are the same, and it takes a few steps toward softening things. It doesn't go far enough in my opinion. It's still intensely vegetal, features a whipcrack of galbanum, and the leather seems "high pitched" to me, and not smooth until very far along in its evolution. I absolutely love Barvard's reference to lamb stew - there's a gamey, meaty, herbal tone here (Devin, too, and yes indeed, like Yatagan. I always thought of Yatagan has always struck me a the warmer, smoothed out Devin).

    There are florals in Aliage, but they feel like afterthoughts. There's a tiny hint of powdery softness, but it's shouted down by the monolithic galbanum and leather. I do not detect the listed peach at all.

    Deep in the base, several hours in, some true softness starts to appear, a nice musk and a dash of ambery warmth - must be the listed myrrh. I do think it's a cool piece of perfumery, immediately recognizable and unique save for its fraternal twin Devin, and I'm enjoying the deep base. The opening several hours just aren't to my taste.

    If I smelled this blind, I would absolutely assume it was masculine...then again, I like to think I'd smell the relation to Devin in two seconds flat and know it was Aliage.

    Dior Jules is my favorite take on this general theme of brown-green vegetal leather.
    Last edited by LiveJazz; 22nd January 2020 at 04:52 PM.
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  10. #130

    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    I’ve fallen behind and I’m up next with a sample. I got wrapped around the axle with the whole Scherrer multiple personalities experience. I think I solved part of the riddle. Grayspoole had sent me the Scherrer samples prior to organizing the sync and so I had both a PDT and an EDT in my box. So complicating the differences in Am and PM skin, there’s also an even chance I’d pulled out different concentrations as well.

    Today I put both concentrations on strips and also on skin. On my 24 hour post shower skin the scent was better than the prior evening, but on the strips it was beautiful. The PDT edged out the EDT for me because I liked the richer florals worked into a bittersweet bouquet, and the slightly darker tone of green in the opening. They followed twin paths, but the PDT brought in more detail, hi-light and shadow, the EDT more soft focus.

    Both were so lovely on paper but were diminished on my skin. The only part that was not better expressed on paper was the very late dry down. The sandalwood never appeared like it did on skin. I think this is an argument for a perfume bracelet or locket to hold the scent away from direct contact with my skin.

    OK - ready to move on. I’ll double up with Aliage to catch up.
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  11. #131

    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Sample 13 of 26
    Mystere D’Orsay , released 1915. Our sample is c. 1950
    Popping this up now for the morning.
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  12. #132
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    I’ve been collecting (but not yet wearing) d’Orsay, so I’m looking forward to Mystère in the AM!

  13. #133
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Sample 13 of 26 is Mystere by d'Orsay. It opens with classic-smelling aldehydes. Those burn off quickly, and then the heart emerges, and it is a bit mysterious.

    This is nice. It is developing, and fading, quickly on me. I like it. I was more wrapped up in Aliage from yesterday. This is smooth and lovely up close. It doesn't seem strong to me, and I don't sense it much from any kind of distance from where I dabbed.

    Into the base, the smell of this up close on skin keeps getting better and better.

    This has the type of patchouli note, I think, that smells like tea to me. That could be a combination effect with frankincense or myrrh. Anyway, it's quite faint under the sweetness from the flowers.
    Last edited by Bavard; 22nd January 2020 at 04:09 PM.

  14. #134
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    I am also looking forward to trying Mystere, I’m wearing Aliage today and hope to post some thoughts about this one later. I think it is hilarious that the always ladylike Estee Lauder produced so many bada** perfumes (Azuree, Aliage, Private Collection,Youth Dew). My favorite of all is probably Aliage, with Azuree a close second. I used to think that I couldn’t wear Youth Dew, but then I tried the vintage bath oil, and I was hooked. Aromatic Elixir doesn’t work for me either. I have some thoughts on why this might be so, but they are not fully formed yet.

    Here’s a photo of the Aliage boxes I have. The samples came from the one on the left. The one on the right is a pressurized atomiseur.
    Aliage Boxes.jpg


    A few more thoughts on Scherrer…

    @Earlyn—Like you, I had forgotten that I had sent you both the EDT and the PDT. Were you able to determine, after your rigorous testing, which was the AM sample and which was the PM? I’ve done side-by-side testing of both, along with dabs of the parfum, and I concluded that they were all close enough and that I enjoyed them all so I stopped worrying about it I think I preferred the EDT by a slight margin, finding it somewhat more floral.

    @LiveJazz—Scherrer’s relationship to Amazone is a good call. Earlyn sent me a sample of Amazone, and I liked it so much (because it felt so familiar) that I immediately bought a bottle (the parfum). I believe Amazone becomes somewhat more floral and warmer than Scherrer, but I would have to test this. Meanwhile, your description of Scherrer’s base aligns with my experience:

    The deep base remains very bracing, almost pure oakmoss and vetiver to my nose, with a little hit of musky warmth. If there is sandalwood, it's light and of the soapy/sharp semi-incensey variety.

    I’ve noticed that there is a creamy, sweetish sandalwood (in the manner of Samsara, where I gather it is mostly Polysantol and not Mysore) and then there is a dry Japanese temple incense sandalwood, which I find most prominently in vintage My Sin. I like both versions.

    I am wondering about the impact of the method of application and its impact on the “laundry musk” or dryer sheet effect identified by Bavard and Live Jazz. I generally use three or four good sized sprays of Scherrer in either the EDT or the PDT, which provides a fairly bold sillage and lasts all day. (The PDT sample comes from bottle that I opened, which has been stored carefully, so I don’t believe it has degraded.) Perhaps small sample dabs of Scherrer evolve into traces of scent that suggest current laundry products? Bavard cited laundry musks in the bases of Genghis Khan, Chanel 1957 and Antaeus Sport (all of which I’ve never tried) and POAL and Coco. No laundry musk for me in POAL, nor would I associate my concept of laundry musk with Coco, which I wore in the 80’s and currently wear another bottle of the 80’s EDP. I feel the scent of laundry products must have changed if they are smelling like Coco these days! I haven’t used any scented laundry products for decades so I will have to do some surreptitious sniffing in the grocery store.
    Currently wearing: Alliage by Estée Lauder

  15. #135
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    In the lone BN review of Mystère d'Orsay, rbaker writes: "The opening is quite gentle, a fleeting hint of a flowery note," turning to "a slightly more leathery experience, like a fresh, soft Italian leather wallet…" These I definitely get, though the overriding amber of his experience, I don't; at least, not yet. In any case, a delight thus far, utterly genderless, and quite a different animal from Scherrer and Aliage. If this leather persists, I'll be investing in a bottle. Let's see how I feel in a few hours.

    UPDATE: Starting to get the ginger, cinnamon, and sandalwood. Definitely FB-worthy (and so I bought a bottle identical to Earlyn's, but mostly full).
    Last edited by PStoller; 22nd January 2020 at 08:59 PM.

  16. #136

    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Playing catch up here-

    Aliage today-

    This is quite an interesting fragrance.
    I definitely get the vegetal notes and the relationship with Yatagan. The fresh cut edges of Bavard’s chopped herbs on the lamb stew is so on the nose, right down to the overheated lanolin. It’s gamey as LiveJazz noted.

    Unlike Yatagan’s largely celery effect, Aliage is like Mirepoix and a dash of Lawrey’s, maybe some turmeric there. Agree with LiveJazz that there are not a lot of flowers in the kitchen, but a little moisture and warmth over the sink brought up some fresh bright citrus and even more galbanum (which is fine by me). I’d like to wear this in summer. The cold I think is keeping it a little congealed. I bet a little sweat and warmth would be great for this to help the shy elements bloom.

    Scherrer
    Grayspoole, you asked whether I knew which (EDT or PDT) I appiled on my AM and PM tests and I can’t tell. I was unaware if I did or did not grab different formulations, only that they seemed like completely different fragrances until dry down. Without confusing things too much, I’ve had four skin applications and each time got a different result. The non-blind skin and non-blind strips also gave very different results. I can say that I preferred the PDT on paper because of the florals which I found so beautiful that I would use Bavard’s description of “heart breaker”. Interesting that you found the EDT more floral. Also the PDT had the deeper green opening to me, I’ve yet to have a consistent wearing on skin!

    Mystere
    Mystere is starting off sweet -trying to figure it out but it has passed so quickly now into warm roses, iris, some nose tickler I can’t place. The sustained sweet undercurrent smells like a familiar, old vintage blend - amber, vanilla, tonka, musk and something else - At first a brown sweet liqueur with a cherry? or hints of preserved fruit. Then a while later it is gets quite dry - like the dry raw materials have been ground in a mortar and pestle and bIown in my face. There is a tannic edge. Bavard mentioned tea and that would fit as well as the astringency of leather (chewed on by me) but I’m thinking taste not smell. I think this base smells closer to early 1900s than mid. Farther into the base there’s is a little milky note - lightly spiced tea and milk with a biscuit. Doesn’t go as sweet as a cookie. I’ll see where else it goes, and will have a second wear to see if I can pick apart the blend and get another look at the top. I just hope my second wear is not wildly different than the first
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  17. #137
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    The base of Mystere is a nice, sweet soft skin scent. I think amber has three definitions, or grades, in the context of perfume. There’s fossilized amber, perfumes that mimic fossilized amber, and perfumes that have some sweetness that isn’t quite vanilla or tonka. The amber in Mystere is the third kind, I think.

    For the laundry musk effect, Coco is the best example I can think of.

    I’m traveling. Lauder for Men is such a fun one to try. It is not one I chose to get a bottle of. Maybe I just wasn’t ready for it, but it felt like too much for me. Too gamy, maybe. I’m glad someone was pushing the envelope in men’s perfumery, but it went too far for me in this case.

  18. #138

    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Mystere last night, and this will be rather short as I found it nice but simple. It started with a very vintage feeling sweet floral aldehydic opening, almost honeyed. What does this opening remind me of, Note? Habanita? Agree with Earlyn that it smells very much of that era. E mentions a nose tickler aspect and I agree...I get that cooling effect in Habanita, too, but that ones much thicker and wetter. I don't know what it is.

    It sweetens further and reminds me of amaretto liquor (again in tune with E here) plus a doughy iris/floral accord. If certain phases of L’Heure Bleue were more confection-y and a little boozy, they might be something like this.

    It dries and fades quickly, becoming a pleasant, clean tonka-ambery-musky-suede skin scent. I wish I detected the sandalwood and spices that PStoller did, but alas, I do not.
    Last edited by LiveJazz; 23rd January 2020 at 04:42 PM.
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  19. #139

    Default Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Lauder for Men (this bottle is from the 80s)


    I recommend everyone just go read Zealot's review of this one, as it does a great job of explaining what it's all about. It's a dry green floral cyphre that was released for men at a time when this style of scent had long been a feminine standard. It was a daring scent for its time in the same way that Insense was, and in fact I think of Insense and Lauder for Men as kindrid spirits...similar dry green profile, citric sourness, shared floral aldehydes...and Lauder goes in a traditional cyphre direction with a dose of woods, and Insense stays resolutely woody and dry.

    It's a focused composition, and like GIII, reads as a prototypical green floral cyphre with all the proportions trimmed and the dead weight removed. I find it hard to pull details out of this one because everything is so well integrated and locked in. I admire it a lot from an "architectural" standpoint. Great stuff.
    Last edited by LiveJazz; 23rd January 2020 at 08:50 PM.
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  20. #140
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Quote Originally Posted by LiveJazz View Post
    It was a daring scent for its time in the same way that Insense was, and in fact I think of Insense and Lauder for Men as kindrid spirits...similar dry green profile, citric sourness, shared floral aldehydes...and Lauder goes in a traditional cyphre direction with a dose of woods, and Insense stays resolutely woody and dry.
    Interesting take. I get that Lauder is a traditional chypre; daring for its time in being marketed as a masculine, perhaps, but very trad now. Insensé strikes me as a very different animal, so I wouldn't have drawn the parallel. But, the explanation makes sense, even if that's not how my nose and brain interpret the two fragrances.

    It's a focused composition, and like GIII, reads as a prototypical green floral cyphre with all the proportions trimmed and the dead weight removed. I find it hard to pull details out of this one because everything is so well integrated and locked in.
    I've never smelled GIII, but agree with the rest of this comment. It's interesting, because I was reading one review that talked about LfM's excellent note separation, whereas I get very little. For me, this is almost too straightforward, too polite. Funny, because you reviewed Mystère as "nice but simple," whereas I find that a more accurate description of the Lauder. Well, better than just "nice," but I found Mystère more complex, and with more "motion." Lauder for Men is a supremely wearable scent, and I'm glad I have a full bottle. But, at least in this wearing from the sample vial, I don't find it particularly striking.

    The last fragrance will be Chanel Antaeus, which I've worn before. Lucky us, it does double duty with the Friday sync, which asks this week for a provocative scent. Antaeus is about as far from Lauder for Men as a chypre can get: loud, complex, and skanky. I may have more notes tomorrow, but suffice it to say that it stands well apart from the rest of this week's samples—not in quality, necessarily, but in profile.

    In any case, I think I can rank this week now:

    1. D’Orsay Mystère
    2. Chanel Antaeus
    3. Lauder for Men
    4. Estee Lauder Aliage
    5. Scherrer by Scherrer

    Mystère was the great surprise for me, which may be why it edged out Antaeus in the moment. The strongly animalic Antaeus can be a challenge, but a rewarding one. Lauder for Men is the easiest wear: there's nothing in it I don't like, but it doesn't quite send me. Aliage might have beaten out Lauder were it not for the cloying peach note, and I might not want quite that much galbanum at a sitting. The Scherrer wore like a promise unkept, but since others have noted its mercurial nature, I might be inclined to upgrade it on a future wearing.

  21. #141

    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Quote Originally Posted by PStoller View Post
    I've never smelled GIII, but agree with the rest of this comment. It's interesting, because I was reading one review that talked about LfM's excellent note separation, whereas I get very little. For me, this is almost too straightforward, too polite. Funny, because you reviewed Mystère as "nice but simple," whereas I find that a more accurate description of the Lauder. Well, better than just "nice," but I found Mystère more complex, and with more "motion." Lauder for Men is a supremely wearable scent, and I'm glad I have a full bottle. But, at least in this wearing from the sample vial, I don't find it particularly striking.
    I see what you mean about Mystere. It does move a lot from top to bottom. I suppose I meant simple more in the sense that it seems very straightforward, like a book with clear prose and a simple plot. A Hemingway, without the fatalism. It smells very good and is classically attractive, and there's nothing wrong with that. A few of the early 20th century scents we've sampled have struck me that way.

    A good cyphre seems very inticate and compact to me, perhaps like an understated mechanical watch...unadorned, but you know there are hundreds of little pieces making it tick with great precision. Just the way my brain interprets and visualizes cyphres, I guess.
    "It's not what you look like when you're doing what you're doing; it's what you're doing when you're doing what you look like you're doing."
    Currently wearing: Seyrig by Bruno Fazzolari

  22. #142

    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Quote Originally Posted by Earlyn View Post
    Aliage today-
    Unlike Yatagan’s largely celery effect, Aliage is like Mirepoix and a dash of Lawrey’s, maybe some turmeric there. Agree with LiveJazz that there are not a lot of flowers in the kitchen, but a little moisture and warmth over the sink brought up some fresh bright citrus and even more galbanum (which is fine by me). I’d like to wear this in summer. The cold I think is keeping it a little congealed. I bet a little sweat and warmth would be great for this to help the shy elements bloom.
    I'm 100% certain this is the case, based on Devin. It'll still be austere and butch, but heat and body warmth soften the base a lot.
    "It's not what you look like when you're doing what you're doing; it's what you're doing when you're doing what you look like you're doing."
    Currently wearing: Seyrig by Bruno Fazzolari

  23. #143
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Quote Originally Posted by LiveJazz View Post
    A good chypre seems very intricate and compact to me, perhaps like an understated mechanical watch...unadorned, but you know there are hundreds of little pieces making it tick with great precision. Just the way my brain interprets and visualizes chypres, I guess.
    Got it. I guess I just like my mechanical watches with more complications. But, as long as the mechanics are sound, there's no wrong way to go here.

    Incidentally, I just gave myself a follow-up spray (I have the gold cap vintage, too) to this AM's sample vial, to see if there was any noticeable difference. Seems to have gone on about the same. The opening has more of what I like—more moss and herbs. The sample dried down too quickly for me, but maybe this will last longer.

  24. #144
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Some more notes. I hope to get to Lauder for Men tomorrow, but the Friday Vintage Synch topic is calling me..

    Mystere

    Mystere (1915) smells like the very vintage composition that it is. In ads from the 1950’s, it was already being sold as an “old favorite.” Earlyn’s 50’s parfum seems to have held up very well. For me, this opens with bergamot and an aromatic note, perhaps lavender. The substance of this perfume seems to be a significant amount of oakmoss—airy, musty, peaty, and ever so faintly sweet. The oakmoss seems to run through the perfume from top to base. Mystere is not strongly floral, but in the middle phase, I do perceive a piquant floral note, like true geranium (dianthus), a bit peppery and with a touch of black licorice rather than cloves. As Mystere develops into the drydown, heliotrope and perhaps orris emerge and a delightful powder/vintage makeup feeling. Mystere warms up somewhat as it dries down, but it does not become especially resinous or ambered to me, remaining a mossy, softly floral chypre to the end.

    Aliage

    Aliage opens with an unusually strong galbanum note and lots of bitter tangy citrus. The amount of galbanum in vintage Aliage is deeply satisfying to me. The only perfume that I can think of with as much galbanum is the original Vent Vert, which I also adore. As a lover of green scents, I am acutely aware that my favorite elements of a bracing vegetal composition—galbanum and citrus notes—are not very long lasting. So I pay close attention to what happens next. Some contemporary greens open promisingly but then turn cloying and sweet, which is such a let down! Vintage Aliage sustains and extends the bitter deep green opening with notes of pine, citronella, oakmoss, and smoky frankincense, along with white bath soap. As others have noted, there are no discernible floral notes in vintage Aliage. I believe the reformulated version is often reflected in the published note lists and in many reviews, where the original uncompromising greeness was softened and made more conventionally feminine with touches of fruit and flowers.

    Live Jazz brought up the relationship between Aliage and Aramis Devin. I have a few drops of vintage Devin from a sample swap. I can’t recall who sent this to me but perhaps it was Cook.bot, who is a deep admirer of Chant’s compositions. Devin is really good stuff. I find it much woodier than Aliage, evolving into a base of warm tobacco, leather, and incense, which seems to include all of the elements of the Three Kings variety of church incense—frankincense, myrrh, and benzoin. The green openings are similar, but Aliage and Devin develop into very different bases.
    Currently wearing: Alliage by Estée Lauder

  25. #145
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    Hi folks-

    I don’t know what I did, but I don’t seem to have Lauder for Men.

    I have this...which I believe is Bavard’s Lentheric for Men, which leaked a little in transit and lost its label.

    B038453C-76F7-46B2-8654-A38A0B6FC1A0.jpg

    Let me know if I have mixed up our two “L....for Men” samples. I’m fine sitting this one out since I have a sample overload. This weekend I want to get started on the P. Kiler set that has been giving me a guilty conscience...
    Currently wearing: Alliage by Estée Lauder

  26. #146
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    That does look like Lentheric Men’s edc.

    I had thought of trying PKiler samples in the evenings, after sampling vintage fragrances during the day, but they were too different for me. I had them for a couple months and had to test them on paper to get through all of them.

    Antaeus is a good one. I could get by with just Antaeus. Epapsiou had me test a fragrance blind in a New York City breakfast diner a while back. Before I figured out it was Antaeus, I was heaping praise on it.

    To me, it is clearly animalic. The woods and patchouli are nice. It matches the bottle, somehow, in my imagination - a serious fragrance.
    Last edited by Bavard; 24th January 2020 at 04:35 PM.

  27. #147

    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    G: The Lauder would have been a skinny 1ml dabber. I was careful packing the samples from the list, but something certainly could have slipped through the cracks. Any other mystery vials?
    "It's not what you look like when you're doing what you're doing; it's what you're doing when you're doing what you look like you're doing."
    Currently wearing: Seyrig by Bruno Fazzolari

  28. #148

    Default Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    The more I wear vintage Antaeus, the more I think it's a soft, seductive scent in gentleman's attire, and not really a powerhouse per its reputation and era - though it is powerful.

    Formerly, the florals and beeswax were the main components to my nose, but wearing it lately, it's more of a suave animalic patch/leather/amber, and my nose is much more attuned to the whallop of castoreum leather and musk that leaps out at the start and persists to the end. The patch is chewy and thick, and the amber/leather is solid but buttery smooth, and the distinctive beeswax gives an interesting waxy counterpoint. Nothing else smells like this.

    The whole thing is just so sensual...not necessarily inappropriate and salacious, just invitingly erotic in a non-creepy way. Gently seductive and a unique gentleman of considerable taste and class. So needless to say, it suits me perfectly.

    Edit: I’m getting a clear, strong and beautiful honey note in the base which I never noticed before. It’s fantastic.

    I don't think anyone requested samples of this one, but here's my bottle:
    Last edited by LiveJazz; 25th January 2020 at 04:06 AM.
    "It's not what you look like when you're doing what you're doing; it's what you're doing when you're doing what you look like you're doing."
    Currently wearing: Seyrig by Bruno Fazzolari

  29. #149
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    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    We might have missed Earlyn with an Antaeus sample. I had sent Grayspoole Antaeus and Antaeus Sport a while back.

  30. #150

    Default Re: Vintage Sample Swap and Synchronization II

    I’ve had Lauder for Men on twice now.
    I enjoyed both wears - this is a nice not really masculine masculine. It seems to wear like the shape of the bottle, with lots of aligned notes - sweet, tart, floral, woody - stacked and reflecting in the middle, bending and blending with each other. It hits my nose like something foamy or fizzy - sweet and sour, refreshing but certainly not bracing.

    Zealot Crusader describes a transition of “sharp florals, aldehydes and the oakmoss base mixing together into something you either love or hate”. It is good for me. This seems like another sunny day fragrance but I like it now in the cool weather just fine. Such an easy wear.

    Since Zealot called out Avon Emprise for style comparison, I’ve got a dab of parfum on my other arm. After the green/veg top I get the heart of flowers, bringing in woods, sharpening and drying. Unlike Lauder for Men, Emprise wears like a cumulus, but it gently stomps on the gender line in similar fashion to Lauder. These kinds of now-here-and-then-there crossovers are interesting historically and as a current wear. They make me think of George Carlin’s oxymoron, “jumbo shrimp” - is it a LARGE shrimp or a little JUMBO?
    ”I want all the perfumes”
    Currently wearing: Anaïs Anaïs by Cacharel




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