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  1. #1
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    Default The Enduring Influence of Oud


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    Super Member Mak-7's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Enduring Influence of Oud

    Per Ensar - he was the first to introduce oud to western markets. I doubt Tom Ford had any influence :P

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    Default Re: The Enduring Influence of Oud

    A few new things here. A shame to lose the old unit of measurement, especially when 12 to 1 isn't really that hard to convert.

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    Default Re: The Enduring Influence of Oud

    Quote Originally Posted by Mak-7 View Post
    Per Ensar - he was the first to introduce oud to western markets. I doubt Tom Ford had any influence :P
    Actually it was Ormonde Jayne that launched the first fine fragrance with OUDH in it. Ormonde Man in September 2004, a few months before YSL's launch of M7. The latter never really took off, but Ormonde Man is in Luca Turin's Best 100 Scents. I'm surprised the author didn't research this properly.

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    Default Re: The Enduring Influence of Oud

    Interesting. Thanks for sharing.
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: The Enduring Influence of Oud

    Quote Originally Posted by Mak-7 View Post
    Per Ensar - he was the first to introduce oud to western markets. I doubt Tom Ford had any influence :P
    Quote Originally Posted by Tamasin View Post
    Actually it was Ormonde Jayne that launched the first fine fragrance with OUDH in it. Ormonde Man in September 2004, a few months before YSL's launch of M7. The latter never really took off, but Ormonde Man is in Luca Turin's Best 100 Scents. I'm surprised the author didn't research this properly.
    M7 was launched in 2002.

    Arguably, the first use of Oud in modern Western/French perfumery was by Gérard Anthony in Balenciaga pour Homme. But, the author isn't making claims about who used it first; rather, she says, "The sharp rise in the popularity of oud has been linked to Tom Ford." That's accurate.

    Ensar is a legendary artist and pioneer, but the scale of his production and price precludes direct influence on the global culture at large or Western culture in particular. (Indirect is another matter.) To 99.99% of Westerners buying oud fragrances today, he's "Ensar Who?"

    Micallef and Montale were selling fragrances called "Aoud" as early as 2004. But Tom Ford promoted oud to a much wider audience beginning with Oud Wood in 2007. I don't think Micallef or Montale (or later, Mancera) had anything like Ford's cachet or market penetration, nor his influence on the big perfume houses.

    No, Ford wasn't first, not even with M7. But he's still a big part of the reason everyone and his brother-in-law now has an oud fragrance. And whether he deserves as much credit as he gets or not, he still does get it, which is what the author actually said. Seems to me she did her research just fine.
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  7. #7
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    Default Re: The Enduring Influence of Oud

    Quote Originally Posted by PStoller View Post
    M7 was launched in 2002.

    Arguably, the first use of Oud in modern Western/French perfumery was by Gérard Anthony in Balenciaga pour Homme. But, the author isn't making claims about who used it first; rather, she says, "The sharp rise in the popularity of oud has been linked to Tom Ford." That's accurate.

    Ensar is a legendary artist and pioneer, but the scale of his production and price precludes direct influence on the global culture at large or Western culture in particular. (Indirect is another matter.) To 99.99% of Westerners buying oud fragrances today, he's "Ensar Who?"

    Micallef and Montale were selling fragrances called "Aoud" as early as 2004. But Tom Ford promoted oud to a much wider audience beginning with Oud Wood in 2007. I don't think Micallef or Montale (or later, Mancera) had anything like Ford's cachet or market penetration, nor his influence on the big perfume houses.

    No, Ford wasn't first, not even with M7. But he's still a big part of the reason everyone and his brother-in-law now has an oud fragrance. And whether he deserves as much credit as he gets or not, he still does get it, which is what the author actually said. Seems to me she did her research just fine.
    Excellent post. Go get'em! <3
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  8. #8

    Default Re: The Enduring Influence of Oud

    Quote Originally Posted by PStoller View Post
    M7 was launched in 2002.

    Arguably, the first use of Oud in modern Western/French perfumery was by Gérard Anthony in Balenciaga pour Homme. But, the author isn't making claims about who used it first; rather, she says, "The sharp rise in the popularity of oud has been linked to Tom Ford." That's accurate.

    Ensar is a legendary artist and pioneer, but the scale of his production and price precludes direct influence on the global culture at large or Western culture in particular. (Indirect is another matter.) To 99.99% of Westerners buying oud fragrances today, he's "Ensar Who?"

    Micallef and Montale were selling fragrances called "Aoud" as early as 2004. But Tom Ford promoted oud to a much wider audience beginning with Oud Wood in 2007. I don't think Micallef or Montale (or later, Mancera) had anything like Ford's cachet or market penetration, nor his influence on the big perfume houses.

    No, Ford wasn't first, not even with M7. But he's still a big part of the reason everyone and his brother-in-law now has an oud fragrance. And whether he deserves as much credit as he gets or not, he still does get it, which is what the author actually said. Seems to me she did her research just fine.
    M7 was launched in November 2004 - 2 months after Ormonde Man.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: The Enduring Influence of Oud

    Interesting article.

    Quote Originally Posted by PStoller View Post
    M7 was launched in 2002.

    Arguably, the first use of Oud in modern Western/French perfumery was by Gérard Anthony in Balenciaga pour Homme. But, the author isn't making claims about who used it first; rather, she says, "The sharp rise in the popularity of oud has been linked to Tom Ford." That's accurate.

    Ensar is a legendary artist and pioneer, but the scale of his production and price precludes direct influence on the global culture at large or Western culture in particular. (Indirect is another matter.) To 99.99% of Westerners buying oud fragrances today, he's "Ensar Who?"

    Micallef and Montale were selling fragrances called "Aoud" as early as 2004. But Tom Ford promoted oud to a much wider audience beginning with Oud Wood in 2007. I don't think Micallef or Montale (or later, Mancera) had anything like Ford's cachet or market penetration, nor his influence on the big perfume houses.

    No, Ford wasn't first, not even with M7. But he's still a big part of the reason everyone and his brother-in-law now has an oud fragrance. And whether he deserves as much credit as he gets or not, he still does get it, which is what the author actually said. Seems to me she did her research just fine.
    Thanks for clarifying.
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  10. #10
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    Default Re: The Enduring Influence of Oud

    Quote Originally Posted by Tamasin View Post
    M7 was launched in November 2004 - 2 months after Ormonde Man.
    No. Wikipedia says M7 was launched in November 2004, but it is in error. M7 Fresh, a flanker, was released in 2004. Basenotes, Fragrantica, et al. say 2002. Here’s one reason why:

    https://adage.com/article/news/yves-...y-europe/36142

    I’m surprised you would post the same claim twice without researching it properly.
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  11. #11
    Basenotes Institution badarun's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Enduring Influence of Oud

    Oud in western fragrances started with Balenciaga Pour Homme, then Guerlain Habit Rouge.

    All other brands followed suit after...
    Currently wearing: Cedrat Boise by Mancera

  12. #12

    Default Re: The Enduring Influence of Oud

    Interesting post.

  13. #13

    Default Re: The Enduring Influence of Oud

    The measurement is actually Tola, rather than Tula. Interesting article

  14. #14

    Default Re: The Enduring Influence of Oud

    The earliest out creation in mass market perfumery that I am aware of was released in 1999: 10 Corso Como. I had a bottle in the early 2000s and it was noticeable. Not sure how recent formulations compare, though.
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  15. #15
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    Default Re: The Enduring Influence of Oud

    Super interesting. Thanks for the article. I just asked friends on Facebook to tell me their favourite men's cologne, and a few chose Tom Ford's Oud Wood, with a few others mentioning cologne including Oud! It does seem popular.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: The Enduring Influence of Oud

    I'm a bit confused by the purpose of this article. The first paragraph suggests that it's a news piece telling us about the change in measurement of oud. I'm not sure why anyone would care but let's have it.

    Then, it goes into a perfunctory coverage of the cultural significance of oud. I enjoyed this part but it was relevant seven years ago. Then the oud trend was on the rise and few Western readers knew about the ingredient and its cultural importance.

    After this cultural background, we dive back into the measurements and wrap things up with a general conclusion: oud is here to stay.

    Below are a couple of things I would have added to this piece:

    • Most of the oud used in Western perfumery is synthetic. Very few niche perfumes have real oud and usually do so in very limited quantities.
    • Tom Ford's fragrances do not use real oud (the only exception maybe being M7 from 2002). They all use synthetic bases that approximate the material. No surprises there given how limited the real stuff is and how much supply a brand like Tom Ford would need. Further, if Tom Ford were to use real oud and keep his margins, he'd have to sell his fragrances for double.
    • The oud trend in the West is actually on the decline. During the boom many fragrances carried some form of the word Oud in their names. We don't see this as much any more. So, from a cultural point of view, the oud trend has largely passed. Synthetic ouds, however, indeed are likely to stay but for a very practical problem perfumers nowadays face: they can't seem to get a decent woody dry-down, especially in mainstream fragrances. This is why, all woody-oriental designer perfumes default to the typical ambroxan mixed with some form of synthetic woods. Passable but not good. Synthetic oud helps solve that problem. Many perfumers continue to use it without labeling the fragrance after it.


    I hope this is helpful.
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