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View Poll Results: Do you wear female fragrances?

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  • I'm a Straight Male, I wear them often

    19 18.27%
  • I'm a Straight Male, sometimes I wear them

    46 44.23%
  • I'm a Straight Male, I never wear them

    28 26.92%
  • I'm an LGBT Male, I wear them often

    4 3.85%
  • I'm an LGBT Male, sometimes I wear them

    6 5.77%
  • I'm an LGBT Male, I never wear them

    1 0.96%
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  1. #31
    Dependent Foamywax's Avatar
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    I buy mostly mens fragrances but have worn some female fragrances . I find womens fragrances more adventurous and longer lasting. I wore Angel alot when i was younger.
    Others i have worn and love:
    Tocade
    Sun moon stars
    Calyx
    Wish Chopard(angel copy)
    Alexander Mcqueen Kingdom
    But I love my masculines...
    Dreamer,Egoiste, Minotaure,l'instant etc..

  2. #32
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    As Levi-Strauss said, binaries are good to think with. They certainly help me

    But I don't find them restrictive. I've samples many scents recently that are more feminine. Not a problem. I've enjoyed some of them, just wouldn't buy a whole bottle in those cases.
    Currently wearing: No. 88 by Czech & Speake

  3. #33

    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    No big deal for me, i really enjoy some Guerlain fragrances. I think you could be really missing out if you limit yourself.
    When the night takes on its own life, the tempo changes. Take along, languorous breath. Linger till dawn, keep your head in the stars. You're suspended in time.

  4. #34

    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    I wear quite a few. If I enjoy them then I don't really care about the gender label. I wouldn't really wear those that make me smell like a teenage girl, or boy for that matter, or anything else that I don't feel suits me and isn't to my liking.

    I'd assume that some simply enjoy/wish to or feel that they have to conform to certain masculine standards and wouldn't want to be perceived as metrosexual/effeminate/homosexual. Depending on the enviroment, this still could get you mocked. Perfume is much less obvious/clear-cut than wearing a skirt though, of course.

    I remember creating this thread to explore this topic.
    http://www.basenotes.net/threads/432...931&viewfull=1

  5. #35
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    I wear what I want. I am afraid I might miss out on something.

  6. #36

    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    as long as I am unaware the fragrance is listed as 'feminine' I'm ok

  7. #37
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    No big deal at all to me. I'm a straight male (not that it should make any difference to perfume preference, IMO) and wear perfume marketed to women all the time. My feeling is I wear whatever smells good, marketing be damned!

    That said, there are some perfumes (I don’t care what they are marketed as) that I just feel uncomfortable wearing, and/or I feel just don’t fit my personality well... Those I avoid wearing, but the gender marketing is not a factor.
    Current Top Ten:
    1) Portrait of a Lady original formula (EdP Frédéric Malle)
    2) Jasmin Antique (Rogue Perfumery)
    3) Giorgio for Men vintage (Giorgio Beverly Hills) - tie
    3) Giorgio V.I.P. Special Reserve (Giorgio Beverly Hills) - tie

    5) Dia pour Homme vintage edt (Amouage)

    6)
    Anat Fritz and its reissue, called Classical (Anat Fritz)
    7) Captain vintage (Molyneux)
    8) Javanese Patchouli (Zegna) - tie
    8) Monsieur de Givenchy vintage (Givenchy) - tie
    8) Polo vintage (Ralph Lauren) - tie

    Currently wearing: MCM Success by MCM

  8. #38

    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    if i like the smell of it i wear it. simple as that.

  9. #39

    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    No big deal.
    Don't think I have any female 'marketed' frags in the wardrobe, a fair few unisex ones.
    As much as I'd like to be in the camp ( lol no pun intended!!) of 'I wear what I want regardless' I'd be kidding myself.
    It's a nice concept and those who adhere to it - kudos.
    Personally - I feel there IS a distinction, whether its from tradition, heritage or marketing, and the rush toward breaking all rules/traditions/heritage/accountability (the 'myth of me - the supreme individual') is generally not a good thing. (But therein is a bigger discussion about where we are heading as the human race! )
    Each to his/her/its own - live n let live - I ain't gonna get in a twist if someone about what someone else chooses to wear.

  10. #40

    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    There's this idea that a men's fragrance is only a men's fragrance because of the way it is marketed.
    Where do you think the push toward getting everyone to accept that all fragrance is ‘genderless’ came from? Marketing perhaps?
    It isn’t because everyone has simultaneously had a Buddha-like awakening, I’ll tell you that much. It takes money, lots of it to change peoples behaviour from the way it is to becoming 'correct'. In 20 years the 'correct' behaviour will become wrong, replaced with a 'new version of correct'. This is just the machine that Edward Bernays helped build still at work all these years later.


    In the right proportions ingredients make a fragrance smell manly. They're the ones I like most. What does manly smell like to me? They're in My Wardrobe.

    Is it my nose or is it marketing? Chicken - Egg.



  11. #41

    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Quote Originally Posted by Monsieur Montana View Post
    I have entered a lot of rooms smelling like a woman and trust me nobody took me for a gay.
    .
    The real test is to wear them in prison.

    I didn't even wear fragrance and once in a while someone thought that I was gay when I was a teenager. Mostly gay men, mislead by their desire, but also the odd ruffian that subscribed to a very narrow view of what's acceptable and/or perhaps was just annoyed that I was a hit with attractive girls whilst he spent his time watching sweaty men kicking a football around whilst his girlfriend was Handgela. These days, starting to get on a bit, it happens less, though I'm still able to turn some heads when visiting a gay bar, regardless of perfume.

    What's the worst that can happen?

  12. #42
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    No issues with men wearing any sort of fragrance branded a certain way.

    However I do disagree with any attempts to render people who disagree that 'anyone can wear anything' as irrelevant - which this post isn't doing, I'm not suggesting that.

    My belief is that, if you're genuinely wearing fragrance "for you" - or, because that's almost impossible when out in the real world, when you're really happy with the scent, however it is marketed - then public opinion and/or the belief that 'this smells too feminine' shouldn't really matter all that much. Self confidence plays a part here, of course.

    But I'm not a fan of the cultural trend of dismantling anything gender-based under the assumption that it's outdated or even oppressive. I disagree that it's collectively beneficial. While fragrance is right on the least important end of that scale I find sense and importance in adhering to and embracing 'masculine' presentability - which, for me, means consistency as much as anything else. Other people are of course free to disagree but there's value in uniform - and room for personality, too. Fragrance is just a part of appearance/style.

    I find most citruses to be great on men even if/when they're marketed as female - as long as they're semi natural and not overly white floral (jasmine, not neroli e.g.), citruses are totally unisex. For most other genres, florals, orientals, whatever - it's much tougher. There's a general 'female fragrance' smell that is like the pink equivalent of ambroxan's 'blue'.
    “If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.”
    Currently wearing: Aventus by Creed

  13. #43
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    I don’t wear anything that smell of fruity floral shampoos, candyfloss, or overtly gourmand /syrupy confections EVEN IF if the fragrance packaging says “For Men”, the ad is fronted by a hyper-masculine celebrity or if the bottle itself sports a pair of testicles.

    The rest is fair game to me. I don’t see it as an issue but I can understand why it can be a big deal to someone with different exposure levels or stronger gender associations.

  14. #44
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Finding fragrances that I actually really love and are willing to spend money on, are sooo hard to find with all the 2 trillion options out there. So with all the work it takes to find and sample, I’ll wear a fragrance marketed toward robots/aliens/or animals if I love it’s smell!

  15. #45

    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Quote Originally Posted by slpfrsly View Post
    No issues with men wearing any sort of fragrance branded a certain way.

    However I do disagree with any attempts to render people who disagree that 'anyone can wear anything' as irrelevant - which this post isn't doing, I'm not suggesting that.

    My belief is that, if you're genuinely wearing fragrance "for you" - or, because that's almost impossible when out in the real world, when you're really happy with the scent, however it is marketed - then public opinion and/or the belief that 'this smells too feminine' shouldn't really matter all that much. Self confidence plays a part here, of course.

    But I'm not a fan of the cultural trend of dismantling anything gender-based under the assumption that it's outdated or even oppressive. I disagree that it's collectively beneficial. While fragrance is right on the least important end of that scale I find sense and importance in adhering to and embracing 'masculine' presentability - which, for me, means consistency as much as anything else. Other people are of course free to disagree but there's value in uniform - and room for personality, too. Fragrance is just a part of appearance/style.

    I find most citruses to be great on men even if/when they're marketed as female - as long as they're semi natural and not overly white floral (jasmine, not neroli e.g.), citruses are totally unisex. For most other genres, florals, orientals, whatever - it's much tougher. There's a general 'female fragrance' smell that is like the pink equivalent of ambroxan's 'blue'.
    Deft 😉

  16. #46

    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Its not a big deal if you love the scent, personally I do not. I find most to be overtly floral or too sweet. There are some classics I like such as Vol de Nuit etc, but there are some unisex fragrances like Creed Pure While Cologne that I love, but find too sweet or floral.
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  17. #47
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Wear what you enjoy.
    <div class="bnsotd"><b>Currently wearing:</b> <a href="ID26148387.html"><img src="http://www.basenotes.net/photos/products/33/26148387-7393.jpg"> Carven L'Eau Intense by Carven</a></div>

  18. #48
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrei Bolkonsky View Post
    Art is universal; even though themes can be more androcentric or gynocentric, works of art are not gender-labelled. A woman can easily put a replica of Titian’s “Venus of Urbino” on the wall of her home, and a straight man can put a replica of khnopff's "The Sphinx, or The Caresses" on his. Beethoven is probably more "masculine" and explosive than Debussy or Erik Satie.
    I would have never thought to ascribe gender traits to music, only mood and emotion. But that goes to your question of why fragrance is subject to it. Can you imagine how closed minded the world would be to music, if it were divided up into gender classes? The very idea is mentally oppressive.

    yin-yang-order-chaos-1200x720.jpg

    So if you apply yin and yang principles to fragrance, substituting a principle for inclusions and effects, the division becomes quite a bit different and one can see that there are components of each in many fragrances.

    Traditional aspects of masculinity and femininity are manufactured and mostly arbitrary. So what accounts for taste? If a thing didn't have a gender label, would you still be drawn to or from it? It's all marketing and conditioning. Would Kouros be a success if it were marketed towards women, or unisex? Would Chanel No22 have fared differently if it had originally been marketed as masculine? Suppose fougeres were called feminine and white florals were masculine. Would that change your perception of either?
    "Once you label me, you negate me." --Søren Kierkegaard

  19. #49
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sunnyfunny View Post
    Traditional aspects of masculinity and femininity are manufactured and mostly arbitrary.
    I think it's this kind of sweeping statement that many people - myself included - would ultimately push back against.

    The Sheik said it above, too. It's slightly patronising to be told that your likes and wants and preferences are all artificial and socially constructed and...etc. If we deconstruct long enough and hard enough then literally nothing is 'true' - or, at least, 'any' truth can be made real...but that's another point.

    Basically, if anyone likes anything, great, go for it, rock it. But there's an issue with demanding - or even expecting/suggesting - the social reaction to be a certain, positive way. I think it's even worse to push forward ideas that wish to silence dissent to these expectations, too - which you're not doing, I know, don't worry. But this is particularly a concern when these discussions can tend to get in to the realm of throwing out offensive labels - "sexist" etc, which I hope they don't and certainly don't want to happen - in order to defend the point and, more importantly, keep a sizeable portion of people quiet because giving their opinion isn't worth the hassle.

    I definitely think there is a gender difference here. Men are valued on consistency in a way women are not. Particularly above a certain age (let's say 25-30, although I think that age is getting older and older/people are losing sight of the importance of this until they're too old themselves and then regret the lack of consistency/discipline). That definitely relates to personal style, of which fragrance is part. Is there going to be a difference in taste between males based on sexuality? You'd assume so to a noticeable, if not dramatic, degree; the voting sort of points to that being true at this stage but wouldn't draw hard conclusions from it. There is a portion of LGBTQ males who are more effeminate than straight men - from the earliest of age - and are drawn to femininity and femaleness in many social ways and so, of course, you'd expect this 'unshackling' from typical masculinity to manifest in the embrace and active enjoyment of feminine fragrances, for ideological and more 'visceral' reasons: but so, too, are perhaps non effeminate LGBTQ males more open to feminine fragrances for the simple fact they're also more likely to be liberated from the social pressures of some forms of masculinity. So it would make sense there's *some* difference between males based on sexuality. How much? Who knows.

    Ultimately, however, I disagree it's all marketing - 'conditioning' can mean anything, really. I think there is wiggle room, of course - just look at the gourmand trend, men are definitely wearing that because women like them, in which case...what's the motivation for wearing? - but by and large you seem to be arguing against any sort of gendered difference while proposing an ancient Chinese philosophy (of which I'll admit I'm no expert).

    I suppose the point I'd make - and I really hope you don't take this personally, I've just realised this post might sound a tad critical or aggressive and that's not my intention whatsoever, so apologies if it comes across that way, it's more just academic/putting my thoughts forward - is that I'm fairly convinced that sex based differences, and thus gendered differences, are real. There is more that binds us than separates us - an important point to never forget - but we shouldn't be scared of the differences and, sadly, I think we will have to go through immense suffering at some point in the next century, socially and individually, to understand this lesson.
    “If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.”
    Currently wearing: Aventus by Creed

  20. #50

    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrei Bolkonsky View Post
    Art is universal; even though themes can be more androcentric or gynocentric, works of art are not gender-labelled. A woman can easily put a replica of Titian’s “Venus of Urbino” on the wall of her home, and a straight man can put a replica of khnopff's "The Sphinx, or The Caresses" on his. Beethoven is probably more "masculine" and explosive than Debussy or Erik Satie. But there is not a strict rule for the appreciation of art regarding genders.

    But perfumes have gender. They are, most of the time, labelled either Male or Female fragrances. That seems to be unfair. Is there a rule about how a man should smell? Why? Where did it come from?

    Another question also arises: is the LGBT crowd more prone to experiment?

    Therefore I ask you: Do you routinely wear female fragrances too, or is it something rare? Do you do it at all?

    What is your opinion about it?

    (don't feel obligated to tell about your Orientation on the written responses to the post).

    I don't think it's unfair for fragrances to be gendered. The same argument could be said of fashion. Why can't men wear dresses and skirts? I mean, we can, but I don't have a problem with various items like dresses, skirts and purses being sold in the Women's department.

    I've sampled women's fragrances to see if there's something that could pass for a men's fragrance or even something that would just work for me. The closest thing I found was one of the Chanel Chance flankers, I think "Fraiche." The opening has an almost green-fresh, aftershave-like note in it. But then it turns powdery in the dry down.

    I personally enjoy the contrasts in gendered fashion and style. I personally don't like smelling like a woman, despite enjoying quite a bit of women's fragrances. I like to smell those fragrances on a woman. I don't want to smell the same as them because I would find that boring. There's clothing styles that I appreciate on a woman, but I wouldn't want to wear them for myself.

    As far as "...how should a man should smell? Why? Where did it come from?" I guess it's an evolution of fashion. The very early men's fragrances smell, at best, very dandy-ish to me and without knowing any better, I'd assume they were something my grandma or great grandma would wear. By the time I was a kid, the typical men's fragrance was the barbershop fougere, stuff like Drakkar Noir and Brut is what I was exposed to. I associated that with good grooming and masculinity. So I'm likely today to still want fragrances that echo elements of that time, and why someone my age probably is likely to reject candy-scented stuff like 1 Million and Invictus.

    Even the modern blue ambroxan trend, which I disliked at first, has produced some compositions that are reminiscent of scents I grew up with, like K by G&G and Blea de Chanel, both of which are slightly like Drakkar Noir and Old Spice Pure Sport Deodorant.

  21. #51
    Sunnyfunny's Avatar
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Quote Originally Posted by slpfrsly View Post
    I think it's this kind of sweeping statement that many people - myself included - would ultimately push back against.

    The Sheik said it above, too. It's slightly patronising to be told that your likes and wants and preferences are all artificial and socially constructed and...etc. If we deconstruct long enough and hard enough then literally nothing is 'true' - or, at least, 'any' truth can be made real...but that's another point.
    So I'm not into post modernism, though for its many flaws, there are some truths inherent but that aside, it sort of comes down to whether or not a person's tastes can be determined by sex hormone level. Or maybe this-- I was actually thinking that maybe there is a connection between taste and certain brain region activity, at which point it is a personality thing and can be broken down into what is most common amongst different genders, and then you get into the debate of whether or not we're born tabularasa (I don't think we are, but I haven't worked it all out yet) and if not, then whether or not our tastes are predetermined. Our tastes, like our personalities, are probably a combination of nature vs. nurture, but I'd like to try and break it down more.

    Basically, if anyone likes anything, great, go for it, rock it. But there's an issue with demanding - or even expecting/suggesting - the social reaction to be a certain, positive way. I think it's even worse to push forward ideas that wish to silence dissent to these expectations, too - which you're not doing, I know, don't worry. But this is particularly a concern when these discussions can tend to get in to the realm of throwing out offensive labels - "sexist" etc, which I hope they don't and certainly don't want to happen - in order to defend the point and, more importantly, keep a sizeable portion of people quiet because giving their opinion isn't worth the hassle.
    I fully agree, and while that was in no way where I was intending to go, I can see how my lack of further clarification could have insinuated it. I probably should have verbally invited discussion, but I guess I just made that assumption. It's a lot more complicated than sexism and I too hope I haven't inadvertently dissuaded anyone from joining in.

    I definitely think there is a gender difference here. Men are valued on consistency in a way women are not. Particularly above a certain age (let's say 25-30, although I think that age is getting older and older/people are losing sight of the importance of this until they're too old themselves and then regret the lack of consistency/discipline). That definitely relates to personal style, of which fragrance is part. Is there going to be a difference in taste between males based on sexuality? You'd assume so to a noticeable, if not dramatic, degree; the voting sort of points to that being true at this stage but wouldn't draw hard conclusions from it. There is a portion of LGBTQ males who are more effeminate than straight men - from the earliest of age - and are drawn to femininity and femaleness in many social ways and so, of course, you'd expect this 'unshackling' from typical masculinity to manifest in the embrace and active enjoyment of feminine fragrances, for ideological and more 'visceral' reasons: but so, too, are perhaps non effeminate LGBTQ males more open to feminine fragrances for the simple fact they're also more likely to be liberated from the social pressures of some forms of masculinity. So it would make sense there's *some* difference between males based on sexuality. How much? Who knows.
    I'm trying to decipher what a value on discipline has to do with masc. or fem. tastes. I wonder if it has something to do with an openness to a certain type of experience. Maybe you are familiar with Big 5? I think we're all here on BN because we each possess at least one Openness to Experience facet, whether it's aesthetic sensitivity, intellectual curiosity, or something else. Maybe preference for variety is a facet that shows up more in lgbt males and women (not trying to be exclusive, just spitballing here) than in men who value consistency. When it's pushed on them and they comply unwillingly, that certainly says something too. So I can see how a measure of discipline, rigidity, can parlay into taste. As far as fragrance is concerned, one might argue that it's the one place a certain measure of rigidity might allow for some adventurism, but if it just doesn't fit your chosen aesthetic, then we're back to our first point, I think.

    Ultimately, however, I disagree it's all marketing - 'conditioning' can mean anything, really. I think there is wiggle room, of course - just look at the gourmand trend, men are definitely wearing that because women like them, in which case...what's the motivation for wearing? - but by and large you seem to be arguing against any sort of gendered difference while proposing an ancient Chinese philosophy (of which I'll admit I'm no expert).
    Maybe not, then. However, there has probably been, at some point, a panel of people who have been given a number of unlabeled smelly vials and told to smell them and give their impressions. If a person had no prior knowledge or idea of what makes a "masculine" or a "feminine" scent, how can you possibly know how each scent is going to be interpreted? Maybe in some alternate universe fougere is what women wear and while floral is de rigueur for men.

    As far as the yin/yang comparison is concerned, I was intrigued and surprised by op's gendering of musical styles and that's what immediately popped into my head. I thought that if you could apply those principles to music, you could apply them to fragrance as well, but by doing so, the fragrances currently marked "masc." and "fem." would have to be relabeled, depending on how many yin/yang principles aligned with each scent. But maybe they wouldn't, now that I'm really thinking about it. Maybe they all sort of fall in line, anyway.

    I suppose the point I'd make - and I really hope you don't take this personally, I've just realised this post might sound a tad critical or aggressive and that's not my intention whatsoever, so apologies if it comes across that way, it's more just academic/putting my thoughts forward - is that I'm fairly convinced that sex based differences, and thus gendered differences, are real. There is more that binds us than separates us - an important point to never forget - but we shouldn't be scared of the differences and, sadly, I think we will have to go through immense suffering at some point in the next century, socially and individually, to understand this lesson.
    Haha yes, sex based differences are real. The boxes of what constitutes masculinity and femininity require much and continual unpacking but ultimately, we've all got a bit of both in us, albeit at differing degrees.

    I was asked a question on some forum recently; it was a general question, open for debate and examination. The question was this: Are men and women more alike, or more different? I answered as you stated-- we are more alike.

    Thanks for the thoughtful response, man.
    "Once you label me, you negate me." --Søren Kierkegaard

  22. #52
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Quote Originally Posted by slpfrsly View Post
    It's slightly patronising to be told that your likes and wants and preferences are all artificial and socially constructed and...etc.
    It's not that your "preferences are all artificial and socially constructed," but rather that they're influenced by social constructs.

    Sex is not gender. Sex is not a social construct; gender is. So, gender-based preferences arise from social constructs of gender identity, which differ between societies. (And here, a society may be defined by nationality, ethnicity, generation, social class, etc.) You may like or dislike a fragrance for any number of reasons, but the perception that a scent is masculine or feminine—and the decision that you will or won't wear it because of that—is entirely founded on the social construct of gender. Gender associations for fragrances simply don't exist outside of a social construct.

    Your preferences are still real: you like what you like. For that matter, social constructs are real much the way anything we make is real. Societies are made manifest via their constructs—heck, societies as a whole are constructs. They're still real. What they aren't is preordained by nature. Regardless, we cannot easily (if at all) separate ourselves from the contexts in which we live, nor have we any great reason to in most cases. So, we accept that certain scents, colors, garments, modes of behavior, etc., are masculine or feminine according to the society we live in. The degree to which that then influences our choices depends largely on how we relate to that society.

    I probably don't like very sweet scents at least in part because I perceive them as "girly"—not intellectually, but subconsciously, because that's been a lifelong gender/scent association of my particular social milieu. My preference is neither right nor wrong for that reason, nor for any other. But I'd be foolish to pretend that I was somehow insulated from such influences by my supposed independent nature. I didn't grow up alone in the wilderness. My notions of gender are primarily received, just like everyone else's.
    Currently wearing: Strategy by Mary Chess

  23. #53
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zealot Crusader View Post
    There isn't a big deal, but inevitably someone will stomp in here and make it one.
    Update: Just like I said yesterday, someone has stomped in here and made it a big deal. No figure pointing, just an observation.

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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Quote Originally Posted by PStoller View Post
    It's not that your "preferences are all artificial and socially constructed," but rather that they're influenced by social constructs.

    Sex is not gender. Sex is not a social construct; gender is. So, gender-based preferences arise from social constructs of gender identity, which differ between societies. (And here, a society may be defined by nationality, ethnicity, generation, social class, etc.) You may like or dislike a fragrance for any number of reasons, but the perception that a scent is masculine or feminine—and the decision that you will or won't wear it because of that—is entirely founded on the social construct of gender. Gender associations for fragrances simply don't exist outside of a social construct.

    Your preferences are still real: you like what you like. For that matter, social constructs are real much the way anything we make is real. Societies are made manifest via their constructs—heck, societies as a whole are constructs. They're still real. What they aren't is preordained by nature. Regardless, we cannot easily (if at all) separate ourselves from the contexts in which we live, nor have we any great reason to in most cases. So, we accept that certain scents, colors, garments, modes of behavior, etc., are masculine or feminine according to the society we live in. The degree to which that then influences our choices depends largely on how we relate to that society.

    I probably don't like very sweet scents at least in part because I perceive them as "girly"—not intellectually, but subconsciously, because that's been a lifelong gender/scent association of my particular social milieu. My preference is neither right nor wrong for that reason, nor for any other. But I'd be foolish to pretend that I was somehow insulated from such influences by my supposed independent nature. I didn't grow up alone in the wilderness. My notions of gender are primarily received, just like everyone else's.
    Very Nice Post.

    Quote Originally Posted by PStoller View Post
    It's not that your "preferences are all artificial and socially constructed," but rather that they're influenced by social constructs. Sex is not gender. Sex is not a social construct; gender is. So, gender-based preferences arise from social constructs of gender identity, which differ between societies. You may like or dislike a fragrance for any number of reasons, but the perception that a scent is masculine or feminine—and the decision that you will or won't wear it because of that—is entirely founded on the social construct of gender.
    Do you know about the ETOROS? Search for "Etoro People" on Wikipedia. You will be surprised about the power of social constructs.
    Currently wearing: Black Aoud by Montale

  25. #55

    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    i really have nothing against it, but it’s just that i haven’t smelled a woman’s fragrance i’d like to wear. Since
    my wife has only three fragrances i can say i wouldn’t wear any one of hers. They’re the run of the mill designer (code satin, armani si and one from shakira)

  26. #56

    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Quote Originally Posted by PStoller View Post
    It's not that your "preferences are all artificial and socially constructed," but rather that they're influenced by social constructs.

    Sex is not gender. Sex is not a social construct; gender is. So, gender-based preferences arise from social constructs of gender identity, which differ between societies. (And here, a society may be defined by nationality, ethnicity, generation, social class, etc.) You may like or dislike a fragrance for any number of reasons, but the perception that a scent is masculine or feminine—and the decision that you will or won't wear it because of that—is entirely founded on the social construct of gender. Gender associations for fragrances simply don't exist outside of a social construct.

    Your preferences are still real: you like what you like. For that matter, social constructs are real much the way anything we make is real. Societies are made manifest via their constructs—heck, societies as a whole are constructs. They're still real. What they aren't is preordained by nature. Regardless, we cannot easily (if at all) separate ourselves from the contexts in which we live, nor have we any great reason to in most cases. So, we accept that certain scents, colors, garments, modes of behavior, etc., are masculine or feminine according to the society we live in. The degree to which that then influences our choices depends largely on how we relate to that society.

    I probably don't like very sweet scents at least in part because I perceive them as "girly"—not intellectually, but subconsciously, because that's been a lifelong gender/scent association of my particular social milieu. My preference is neither right nor wrong for that reason, nor for any other. But I'd be foolish to pretend that I was somehow insulated from such influences by my supposed independent nature. I didn't grow up alone in the wilderness. My notions of gender are primarily received, just like everyone else's.
    Yup, I agree, society shapes us no matter how aware we are about it. Some more than the other and the logical irony that the more influenced you are the less you know about it....
    Currently wearing: Coco Noir Parfum by Chanel

  27. #57
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Quote Originally Posted by PStoller View Post
    It's not that your "preferences are all artificial and socially constructed," but rather that they're influenced by social constructs.

    Sex is not gender. Sex is not a social construct; gender is. So, gender-based preferences arise from social constructs of gender identity, which differ between societies. (And here, a society may be defined by nationality, ethnicity, generation, social class, etc.) You may like or dislike a fragrance for any number of reasons, but the perception that a scent is masculine or feminine—and the decision that you will or won't wear it because of that—is entirely founded on the social construct of gender. Gender associations for fragrances simply don't exist outside of a social construct.

    Your preferences are still real: you like what you like. For that matter, social constructs are real much the way anything we make is real. Societies are made manifest via their constructs—heck, societies as a whole are constructs. They're still real. What they aren't is preordained by nature. Regardless, we cannot easily (if at all) separate ourselves from the contexts in which we live, nor have we any great reason to in most cases. So, we accept that certain scents, colors, garments, modes of behavior, etc., are masculine or feminine according to the society we live in. The degree to which that then influences our choices depends largely on how we relate to that society.

    I probably don't like very sweet scents at least in part because I perceive them as "girly"—not intellectually, but subconsciously, because that's been a lifelong gender/scent association of my particular social milieu. My preference is neither right nor wrong for that reason, nor for any other. But I'd be foolish to pretend that I was somehow insulated from such influences by my supposed independent nature. I didn't grow up alone in the wilderness. My notions of gender are primarily received, just like everyone else's.
    Succinctly explained.

  28. #58
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrei Bolkonsky View Post
    Do you do it at all?
    Frenchman_Non.jpg

  29. #59
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    My perfume is kind of a big deal.

  30. #60
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    Default Re: Men wearing Female Fragrances: What is the big deal?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bavard View Post
    My perfume is kind of a big deal.
    Tell me you've seen Anchorman: Legend of Ron Burgundy, please.
    oh look, I have a signature
    Discover a searchable archive of my reviews and more at The Scented Devil
    Currently wearing: Eau d'Ikar by Sisley




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