Perfume Directory

Ted Lapidus pour Homme (1978)
by Ted Lapidus

Advertisement

Ted Lapidus pour Homme information

Year of Launch1978
GenderMasculine
AvailabilityDiscontinued
Average Rating
(based on 35 votes)

People and companies

HouseTed Lapidus
Parent CompanyBogart Group
Parent Company at launchL'Oréal Group

About Ted Lapidus pour Homme

Ted Lapidus pour Homme is a masculine fragrance by Ted Lapidus. The scent was launched in 1978

Ted Lapidus pour Homme fragrance notes

  1. Top Notes
  2. Heart Notes
  3. Base notes

Reviews of Ted Lapidus pour Homme

Ted Lapidous pour Homme(1978)
I oversprayed this the first time I tried this and those who know this scent will maybe chuckle but other than some vintage Paco Rabanne this is the only vintage original I have. It was like all the sudden a '78 T-top Trans Am pulled up and some macho guy with a gaudy open collar shirt and a leather vest got out and decided I needed a hug. I didn't. He squeezed the breath out of me. Needless to say I was eager to bail on that wearing. Approaching this more cautiously this time out I have to say I am impressed. The opening is really fantastic I pick up a perfectly placed rum note amongst the sage and aldehydes and the leather and musk is really well done. I mean it screams 1978 but does it well. If I ever had the means to search out other disco'd 70's gems I could only hope they would turn out smelling this good. Thumbs Up!
10th October, 2020
Just an amazing treasure, oakmoss at its best, in perfect play with the olibanum. Really masculine, for a tough gentleman. 10/10.
21st January, 2019
Ted Lapidus was a designer originally known for his unisex haute couture in the 1960's, making this very masculine fragrance something of a surprise as a male counterpart to his heady feminine perfume debut Ted Lapidus Vu in 1975. Three years had passed since that one first hit shelves, and the Ted Lapidus brand, which had since dropped couture in favor of ready-made accessories and fragrance, hooked up with L'Oreal and Speidel-Textron, the former of whom helped compose his fragrances, and the latter who distributed. These were the days before The Bogart Group bought the fragrance division of Ted Lapidus and it inherited the trademark loudness of Bogart designs, before Lapidus Pour Homme (1987) would really put the brand on the map as a maker of dynamic powerhouse masculines (which it still is today), and long before everything came in a column bottle with a built-in sprayer head a la a Bogart fragrance. Verily, this initial masculine debut, simply labelled "Pour Homme" but often distinguished from the latter masculine bearing the same name by being referred to as "Ted Lapidus Pour Homme" (which is still confusing to be honest), didn't even come in a spray format initially. The very 70's bottle design would eventually get a built-in sprayer variant when Bogart picked up the brand in 1983 and began to manufacture it until it's replacement in 1987, but nothing else changed about the scent. Ted Lapidus Pour Homme isn't wild, or cutting-edge like every other masculine bearing the Lapidus name, but is a rather forthright scent that falls into the "unapologetic macho" category of the mid-to-late 70's, when Disco raged, flower print shirts with high-collars were left unbuttoned, and huge medallions adorned hairy chests. A man could get away with mutton chops for the first time since the American Civil War ended, and he could wear this out on his Saturday nights.

Ironically, this one does scream power, but not "party" to me, and like some other fragrances from this period, was only incidentally associated with the disco scene because of it's use in clubs. Ted Lapidus Pour Homme is first and foremost a leather chypre, with familiar aldehydes and lemon in the opening. It's gasoline pungency was similar to Knize Ten (1924) or Aramis (1965), but there was more going on than that. To read the blurb on an original 1978 carded sample: "An exceptional and original fragrance of incense, wood, leather, and rum. It is the perfect combination of the French tradition of quality, and the American Spirit of modernity and boldness". I can't say I entirely disagree, outside of the "perfect" part, since there was competition for this kind of thing back then. I do detect the rum in the opening, which sets it apart from the aforementioned leathers, and gives it an almost feminine sweetness not unlike Revlon's charmer Charlie (1973), but it doesn't stay there long when bergamot, thyme, sage, and coriander come to dry it out as the middle approaches. Spruce as listed comes into the middle, but pine wood is pine wood to me, and this might as well be fir for all I know, but it's a woody accord that's a step above the gentleness of sandalwood, but before reaching the abrasion of cedar. After that, jasmine, leather, and patchouli come in next, but the patchouli is cancelled mostly by the smoke of vetiver, which when combining with the rum up top and aforementioned incense, creates a tobacco ghost note, which through proxy makes this a leather and tobacco scent, even if tobacco isn't explicitly present. Castoreum gives us the animalic kick in the pants needed to take this to super macho land, but the herbs in the top combined with the base's olibdanum, labdanum, musk, and buttery oakmoss connect this to Van Cleef & Arpels Pour Homme (1978) and Bogart Eau de Toilette Pour Homme (1975) as more of a classy aromatic leather chypre. If anything, this is a bridge between those buttoned-down leathers, and the "ride 'em cowboy" affairs of Chaps Ralph Lauren (1979) or Dior Jules (1980).

Ted Lapidus Pour Homme was sadly a newcomer scent that got buried in a glut of established designer masculines in the late 70's and early 80's transition from aromatics to powerhouses. It is a very high quality, potent, and sophisticated leather scent that has the beating chest of an alpha male in one hand, but the raised pinky and overcoat of a true gentleman in the other, with that boozy rum and incense acting as the link between them. The latter enters the drawing room, and after a cigar and glass of bourbon, becomes the former and is ready to go a few rounds of fisticuffs for that sideways glance you cast him earlier. It was an "inbetweener" like some of the scents that later bridged the 80's to the 90's, with one foot in the outgoing style, and one foot in the arriving one, but little of that compromise is detected here since both incoming and outgoing styles were rather potent between the 70's and 80's! As a leather scent, this is utterly fantastic, but because it was retired after only just shy of a decade in production due to the house relaunching with Lapidus Pour Homme, it can get ridiculously expensive for surviving full bottles, meaning it's not worth the chase unless your pockets are deep or patience is extremely high. There are comparable leathers, like anything else I named in this review, and Ted Lapidus Pour Homme's biggest point of merit anyway is being a hybrid between several of them. It didn't light the world on fire, but smells of a nice fireplace and glass of aged liquor. It's conventional 70's but also of impeccable quality both in projection and sillage, so folks lucky enough to have it will likely take forever to use what they have, especially considering it's certainly a winter-time affair only. In conclusion, this is amazing stuff, but if you're looking for something both powerful and truly unique, you'll want to skip forward to the bizarre but lovable rainbow scream that is the 1987 Lapidus Pour Homme. A hard to find gem, but admittedly of niche interest due to the price of admission, just like modern niche scents!
01st May, 2018
I’ve really tried with this one over the course of a few years, revisiting it frequently but ‘never’ wearing Ted Lapidus Pour Homme outside of my 4 walls because this composition is a hella dated and strange mess of a perfume, c’mon dudes, who are we kidding. This is straight up old man all the way, and that was in 1978! This is an icky perfume if you ‘really’ take a step back and think about it. Beyond a product it’s time, I think this was dated when it came out.

First of all, this composition is nuclear for a denatured alcohol content of just a measly 90 percent that projects forever, and of course, lasts forever.

There’s a shit load of aldehydes in this from opening to the long, long close followed by a very strong and pissy jasmine flower followed furthermore more by a smoky frankincense with a strong undertone of castoreum bathed in patchouli and vetiver that creates the olfactory illusion 100% of an ‘incredibly’ heavy smoker of cigarettes that wears a beehive hairdo and sprays on a ridiculous amount of Rave #4 hairspray, the ultimate hold. By the way, the vetiver in this makes me gag.

I kid you not, it took me a long time to pin this down which began with a love affair until I take started noticing things... this entire mess reeks of stale cigarettes, overpowering hairspray and an icky animalic background. Granted, this whole entire thing is a masterpiece because Ted Lapidus is ridiculously complex and trails forever but my God, this shit is rough.

My conclusion is that Ted Lapidus himself was a heavy smoker and loved it, loved leather and the smell of Women’s hairspray in the late 70’s along with the smell of Women’s perfume, especially jasmine flower because that note is so prominent here. It’s a very strange and scattered scent. I can grasp it fully and see what the perfumer has intended but after playing with this garbage for a few years here and there with about 20 full on wearings, in my opinion... this is gross smelling. Smells like hairspray!

This is horrendous smelling and the epitome of dated. I don’t even think the term ‘old man’ can reach this kinda echelon.

If you seriously consider wearing this, I pity you and everyone within your wake which will be for a good 15 feet. Away with the 70’s forever!
12th October, 2017 (last edited: 20th December, 2019)
Oak moss,smoky,lavander ,very animalic and leather and more. Not the best but very good fragrance 70/80'.
30th August, 2017
Leathry , Earthy , Smoky..
Great classic chypre bring back beautiful memories.
Lapidus Pour Homme the smell from the past.
10/10
14th April, 2016 (last edited: 16th April, 2016)

Add your review of Ted Lapidus pour Homme

You need to be logged in to add a review

Shop for Ted Lapidus pour Homme products online

Some of the links we use are affiliate links, meaning if you click the links and make a purchase, we may receive a commission, which helps us keep the site running

Search on eBay


Member images of Ted Lapidus pour Homme

There are no member images of Ted Lapidus pour Homme yet. Why not be the first?

You need to log in or register to upload images

Private Notes

You need to be logged in (or register here) to use Private Notes.

Advertisement

Advertisement