Nathalie Lorson / Roja Dove / Michael Storer - Scent Treks through Time


23rd June, 2008

Editor's note: These interviews are the fifth part of a series in which Marian Bendeth explores what a panel of modern perfumers would say if they could travel back to the time of their choosing, to meet, chat and co-create with a perfumer of the past. An introduction to the series and table of contents is here.

Nathalie Lorson

Senior Perfumer, Firmenich

Creations: Amethyst de Lalique; Kate by Kate Moss; Bulgari Pour Femme; Perles de LaliqueEncre Noire; Dream of Pink, Lacoste (more...)

Marian Bendeth: If it was possible to travel back in time to any particular century and decade of your choice to meet your number one inspirational Perfumer -- When would that be? Please state century and decade:

Nathalie Lorson: It would the be 20th century, during the 1960’s

MB:Who would that be? What specific questions would you want to learn from them?

Edmond Roudnitska !

I would want to know what was his inspiration when he created Eau Sauvage de Christian Dior !

MB: If you could team up together in that time period, who would you like to co-create a fragrance for?

I would like to create a fragrance for Grace Kelly who was a particularly elegant and interesting woman.

MB: If you could bring anything back with you, what would that be?

A “Stacking chair” by Verner Panton, or a “Egg Chair” by Arne Jacobsen !

 

Roja Dove

Proffeseur de Parfums, Harrods Haute Parfumerie

Creations: Scandal, Enslaved, Unspoken

Marian Bendeth: If it was possible to travel back in time to any particular century and decade of your choice to meet your number one inspirational Perfumer:

When would that be? Who would that be?

Roja Dove: I would travel back to the 1910's to meet François Coty

I would ask him how he felt about his peer group ignoring the new absolutes and synthetics which were going to make the great perfumes creations of the 1920's and 1930's as they thought they were vulgar and lacking refinement; whereas the truth is they were frightened of them.

I would also like to know how he felt about owning the largest perfume empire on the profits from those scents. As we know Jacques Guerlain often took his themes and made them refined and elegant - I would love to know how he felt having such a beautiful poet constantly looking at his work for inspiration.

MB: If you could team up together in that time period, who would you like to co-create a fragrance for?

Elsa Schiaparelli as she was so 'anti establishment' and yet she seduced them all

MB: If you could bring anything back with you, what would that be?

A 1 litre bottle of Guerlains 1904 creation Parfums de Champs-Elysees in the Baccarat turtle bottle which was made in 1914 to commemorate their move to 68 Champs Elysees. I was given a litre of it in a perfumers flask, which Jean-Paul weighed up, I have half left and I would love to put it in its original bottle. I believe it is one of the most extraordinary scents ever made.

 

Michael Storer

Independent Perfumer

Creations: Kadota, Stephanie, Genvieve, Yvette, Monk, Djin (more...)

Marian Bendeth: If it was possible to travel back in time to any particular century and decade of your choice to meet your number one inspirational Perfumer:

When would that be? Please state century and decade:

Michael Storer: I believe I would choose to be in about 1945.

MB: Who would that be?

MS: Francis Fabron, creator of Balenciaga's Le Dix; Givenchy's L'Interdit; Nina Ricci's L'Air du Temps

I believe I would choose to be in about 1945 working along side Francis Fabron. He built two wonderful perfumes that were favorites of my mother. Balenciaga's Le Dix as well as Nina Ricci's L'Air du Temps. (Of course, the original formulae).

MB:What specific questions would you want to ask him?

I would love to learn to use aldehydes more effectively and particularly how to build a good carnation accord using them. I.e. how do you punch up a carnation's top so it isn't too muddled?

MB:If you could team up together in that time period, who would you like to co-create a fragrance for?

I'd like have liked to work together with him to develop a fragrance for mother. A deep, rich, velvety carnation and violet- orris fragrance enthroned on a base vetiver and the finest sandalwood. I just admire what he did and would like to spend a few weeks working at his side to watch how he created. I love the classics of the late 1940's and on through the early 1950's. It was a time of real glamour fragrances.

MB: If you could bring anything back with you, what would that be?

What I'd bring back, besides what I hope I'd learn from Mr. Fabron, would be a tanker-ful of the finest Mysore sandalwood. Nothing compares to the bottle of it my father kept unopened from the 1930's and which I opened and usurped in 1966 when I first began exploring perfumery for myself.

I would like to be associated with the fragrances I mentioned above as well as Chanel No. 5 for it's originality and Houbigant's original 1912 version of Quelques Fleurs for its sweet memory of my mother's mother and Guerlain's Shalimar for its long, beloved history and wonderful scent.

Join Marian again next time for time-travels with L'Artisan's Bertrand Duchaufour, Marvel Fields (Takasago) and Steven DeMarcardo (Fragrance Resources).

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About the author: Marian Bendeth

Marian Bendeth is a Global Fragrance Expert based out of Toronto, Canada. Marian has won six fragrance industry editorial awards for her writing. You can find out more on her website marianbendeth.com

Website: http://www.marianbendeth.com/

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