Perfume Reviews

Reviews by drseid

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Mriga (มฤค) by Prin

Mriga goes on with a moderately aromatic and slightly bitter, deep, dark green wormwood and fir balsam focal tandem with sharp woody vetiver support before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the dark fir led green accord remains, coupling with an emergent strong animalic musk that permeates and enhances it, supported by gothic dulled rose and a touch of gauze-like Oud. During the late dry-down the dark green aspect vacates as remnants of the residual musk join slightly powdery amber-like labdanum with an added leathery facet through the finish. Projection is average and longevity very good at around 10 hours on skin.

Going into trying Mriga I had heard that the composition was musk focused. As I tend to dislike heavy animalics, I had a bad feeling the perfume would not be my cup of tea. It turns out, however, that perfumer Prin Lomros has composed a real winner that is the perfect balance of animalic musk with a very convincing dark green fir balsam. The supporting dulled rose adds a very nice additional facet to the composition that is subtle, but extremely effective in achieving the balance sought. It should be mentioned that the musk used here is synthetic, but it never comes off smelling that way, instead rounding out some of the most off-putting aspects of real deer musk, while maintaining the realism of the "good stuff." I strongly prefer it to real deer musk and would love other compositions to follow suit if they can pull it off as well as in Mriga. If there is a weakness to the composition, it would have to be in the late dry-down, as Mriga turns a bit bland with the gentle powdery amber-like labdanum finish that while pleasant smelling, is somewhat of a letdown after a great aromatic open and the balanced musky green heart that impressed so much. The bottom line is the animalic expectations of the $190 per 30ml bottle Mriga may scare off some, but the perfume is actually very approachable and is a "very good" to "excellent" 3.5 to 4 stars out of 5 rated effort by Prin Lomros that is recommended to all but the most animalic perfume averse among us.
25th October, 2020
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She Came To Stay by Edition Perfumes

She Came To Stay goes on with a highly aromatic natural smelling lemon spiked basil spice with hints of underlying clove before quickly transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the deep, smooth clove remains, now as co-star, joining slightly sharp, aromatic natural cedar wood as the focus, with cinnamon-like nutmeg spice, woody vetiver and earthy patchouli support. The composition stays highly linear through the late dry-down, as the clove and cedar remain co-stars through the finish shedding their supporting notes as the development runs its course. Projection is average, as is longevity at around 8 hours on skin.

She Came To Stay is somewhat tough to evaluate for this writer. On the one hand, the composition smells superb, with its lifelike approximation of cedar wood and deep clove spice, not wholly unlike a personal favorite underrated Edouard Flechier perfume from 1991 called Vendetta pour Homme by Valentino. This is not a copy, but it does have the two primary notes that dive that one, with She Came To Stay also having a couple key supporting notes of basil and patchouli, then swapping similar nutmeg for the cinnamon in Vendetta. Similarity aside, another thing She Came To Stay lacks is any real development. This is not a major weakness (especially since it smells incredible), but Vendetta, while similarly incredible smelling, has much better performance, is the more complete perfume... and it came first. While discontinued, Vendetta pour Homme also can still be had on the aftermarket for a relatively inexpensive sum in comparison. The bottom line is the $160 per 60ml She Came To Stay is a fine all-natural perfume effort by Mr. Timothy Han, but it comes far too close to a superior release from a superior perfumer to earn higher than a "very good" 3.5 stars out of 5 rating and an avoid recommendation due to the similar, but superior smelling and performing Vendetta pour Homme being easily obtained for less.
19th October, 2020
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Haxan by Parfum Prissana

Haxan opens with a relatively dry cedar wood and woody vetiver starring tandem, tempered by a tinge of slightly sweet sandalwood and aromatic patchouli before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart, the slightly sweet sandalwood and patchouli remain, now supporting a strong, damp mushroom accord that takes the fore, with additional green spruce and earthy aromatic cypress support. During the late dry-down, the woods and mushroom accord vacate leaving remnants of the patchouli in support of a focal aromatic, slightly sweet green fir balsam that emerges and remains strong through the finish. Projection is average, but longevity is excellent at around 12 hours on skin.

Haxan has a laundry list of notes, some rather exotic and the truth is the more objective note breakdown above doesn't cover even a tenth of them. I found myself struggling, especially in the mid-section trying to identify individual notes and eventually gave up and just "went with it." One accord that really sticks out, however, is the mushroom. I am not a fan of mushrooms at all, and when paired with the patchouli and the aromatic slightly sweet greens it was quite unsettling and not particularly pleasant smelling. On the flip-side, the disappointing middle is flanked by an impressive woody natural smelling cedar and vetiver led open, and a fine fir balsam led finish that makes grading Haxan quite tough, but in the end they just can't overcome the odd musky mushroom dominated middle. The bottom line is the $140 per 30ml Haxan proves a bit too ambitious to succeed due to its laundry list of odd notes that don't quite come together well in the critical mid-section to yield anything more than an "average" 2.5 stars out of 5 rating and a neutral recommendation.
11th October, 2020
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Relax by Davidoff

Relax opens with tonka bean sweetened spearmint supported by grassy tarragon spice before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart, the mint remains, now supporting an emergent prominent mossy green oakmoss that takes the fore, with additional aromatic patchouli and thyme-like bay leaf spice support. During the late dry-down, the composition morphs to a relatively dry, slightly powdery vanilla and amber focus as the mint and spice vacate, leaving remnants of the patchouli in support through the finish. Projection is below average, and longevity on the low side of average at around 7 hours on skin.

Relax is the kind of composition that can easily be overlooked. On the positive side it smells relatively good with its rare, sweet mint focus not too unlike the Edouard Flechier composed Jean Luc Amsler Homme that came out a full decade later. That said, unlike the latter that in many ways is superior smelling by adding an interesting cucumber note to the mix, Relax starts out near equally impressive, but has a very ho-hum late dry-down with equally disappointing performance metrics. Maybe in 1990 when it was the only choice of the two to be had I might have found Relax more compelling, but nowadays it just seems to be a "good enough" release from thirty years ago that didn't distinguish itself enough then, and even less-so now. The bottom line is the long-since discontinued $300 per 75ml bottle on the aftermarket Relax is a "good" 3 stars out of 5 rated effort, but it comes nowhere near close to distinguishing itself from its 90's peers (and Jean Luc Amsler Homme) to justify a recommendation to seek it out at any price (let alone the crazy cost it currently commands).
04th October, 2020 (last edited: 05th October, 2020)
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Iquitos by Alain Delon

Iquitos goes on with a honeyed rose and a hint of supporting mandarin orange before quickly moving to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the rose takes over as the focus with the honeyed aspect receding though still quite present, revealing its slightly powdery facet as a moderately animalic musk and civet duo join fine white floral jasmine and mossy green oakmoss from the base providing significant support. During the late dry-down the animalics and rose all but vacate, leaving remnants of the now dry honey to join with a slightly sweet amber and sandalwood tandem with leather support through the finish. Projection is very good, as is longevity at around 11-12 hours on skin.

As most masculines from the 80s were winners, I guess it shouldn't be a great surprise that Iquitos is another fine example of the period's amazing output. The composition is a animalic honeyed rose at its core, but the oakmoss within adds an element to the composition that just couldn't be replicated easily in today's IFRA regulated world, making one appreciate just how good things were back then. While it has been quite a while since I have worn it, for some reason I feel like there is a similarity to Oscar de la Renta pour Lui here, and if so, that is far from a bad thing. Similar or not, Iquitos smells superb regardless. The bottom line is the discontinued $340 per 100 ml bottle on the aftermarket Iquitos may not prove the best smelling masculine of the great 80s, but that title is not necessary to still claim an "excellent" 4 stars out of 5 rating and a strong recommendation to vintage perfume collectors.
14th September, 2020 (last edited: 13th September, 2020)
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Acqua di Giò Profumo by Giorgio Armani

Acqua di Gio Profumo opens with a blast of orange bergamot and a black peppery sage and geranium tandem with a soft aquatic accord in support before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the peppery sage and geranium tandem remains, as does the supporting soft aquatic accord as the composition is infused by woody incense rising from the base. During the late dry-down, the peppery woody incense infused accord recedes then vacates, unveiling subtle patchouli in the base that combines with remnants of the supporting aquatics through the finish. Projection is below average to average and longevity is very good at around 10 hours on skin.

When the original Acqua di Gio was released in the 90s I, like just about everyone else bought a bottle. I always thought the stuff smelled good, but I never understood its amazing sales success, as it seemed to be missing something with many better options in the crowded genre. A couple decades later with the introduction of Acqua di Gio Profumo, perfumer Morillas has accomplished an extremely rare feat in releasing a flanker that smells much better than the already successful original. The sage and incense utilized here add the missing peppery/woody component to the perfume that counters the all too familiar Acqua di Gio DNA that appealed to many from the start. Now the composition is much more appealing and complete in the opinion of this writer, while never ceding the perfume's already winning formula. The bottom line is the $130 per 75ml bottle Acqua di Gio Profumo takes an already good smelling perfume and by adding a couple key notes makes it an "excellent" 3.5 to 4 stars out of 5 rated one that is recommended to tepid fans of the original that wanted just a bit more.
05th September, 2020
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Adjatay Cuir Narcotique by The Different Company

Adjatay opens with smooth yellow floral ylang-ylang at the fore with a hard leather accord undertone before quickly moving to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the moderately sweet banana-like ylang-ylang remains, now in support of indolic white floral tuberose that takes the fore, infused with significant rough leather rising from the base and a touch of indolic jasmine. During the late dry-down the white and yellow florals gradually dissipate then vacate, leaving remnants of of the rough leather, now softened by woody-leathery styrax and slightly sweet sandalwood smoothing it through the finish. Projection is very good and longevity excellent at well over 12 hours on skin.

Adjatay was love at first sniff for this writer. Tuberose, which is the focal note through most of the composition's development is usually a challenging one for me, but the leather balances the normally difficult white floral quite well, as does the soft leathery styrax and sandalwood in the base. The ylang-ylang also is quite prominent, playing a key role in adding a fruity floral banana aspect to the heart that melds perfectly with the tuberose. The late dry-down is probably the best part of the composition as the florals vacate to allow the now softened leather and smooth woods to sing. On the whole, the development is relatively linear (in a good way) and near-perfectly controlled. One non-perfume smell related comment is the solid metal cap on the 100 ml bottle at least is not particularly well-designed. It has a tall graduated structure that makes gripping it extremely difficult, and it snaps tightly and firmly into place to the bottle, making for quite the challenge in getting the darned thing off. Well-built, but *not* good. The bottom line is the possibly discontinued $119 per 100 ml bottle at discounters Adjatay is an "excellent" 4 stars out of 5 rated perfectly unisex floral leather perfume that is recommended to everyone, even those that usually disdain wearing white floral tuberose.
23rd August, 2020
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Salted Green Mango by Strangers Parfumerie

Salted Green Mango opens with subdued bitter orange and moderately sweet hybrid pineapple and melon smelling mango before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the moderately sweet pineapple and melon-like mango remains, now adding a synthetic smelling salty, aquatic accord with sharp vetiver support. During the late dry-down the salty aquatic aspect dissipates and finally vacates, leaving the remnants of of the moderately sweet mango to pair with relatively dry sandalwood through the finish. Projection is average and longevity excellent at over 12 hours on skin.

I have had tremendous positive experiences with several other Prin Lomros compositions, finding the perfumer extremely talented. Knowing this perfume was a Lomros composition I fully expected to love it, but Salted Green Mango turned out to be a mega-stinker. The open immediately is off-putting, with the green mango's odd mixture of a sweet melon and pineapple hybrid that is quite unsettling. That said, the worst aspect of the composition is in the early heart phase, when a disgusting synthetic smelling salty oceanic accord is added to the mix, bringing the composition to scrubber territory in near record time. Things do improve considerably in the late dry-down when the salty oceanic accord finally leaves, allowing a fine, relatively dry sandalwood to balance out the remnants of the mango creating a rather pleasant finish. Pleasant late dry-down aside, had I not been forcing myself to continue wearing the perfume for this write-up, I would have never reached it as the middle is truly unbearable. The bottom line is the $80 per 30 ml bottle Salted Green Mango is easily the worst thing I have sniffed from talented perfumer Lomros (and one of the worst I have sniffed period), earning it a "poor" 1.5 stars out of 5 rating and an *extremely* strong avoid recommendation to all.
09th August, 2020
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Hammam Bouquet by Penhaligon's

*This is a review of vintage Hammam Bouquet

Hammam Bouquet goes on with nose tingling bergamot spiked natural rose before quickly transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its heart the rose remains sans bergamot turning dark and dull, now pairing with co-starring animalic musk rising from the base with slightly aromatic lavender and subdued jasmine support. During the late dry-down the musk laden dulled rose gradually recedes, unveiling soft, slightly powdery amber in the base that takes the fore through the finish. Projection is good and longevity excellent at just under 12 hours on skin.

When I first sprayed Hammam Bouquet on skin I was quite excited, as the bergamot laced natural smelling rose open is truly quite impressive. If I could bottle that open and make it last into the heart section this review would be much more positive and enthusiastic... Alas, things go south quite quickly, as the composition's key heart section has "mortuary" written all over it with its gothic, dulled, musky rose presentation that falls flat. The late dry-down restores things back to life in relative terms, but it is really just a quite typical pleasant amber led finish that normally would go unnoticed, save for its rescue of a perfume that was previously coffin bound. The bottom line is the approximately $100 per 100 ml on the aftermarket vintage Hammam Bouquet is a relatively disappointing offering that contains quality ingredients but gives new meaning to the words "dated" and "lifeless," earning it an "above average" 2.5 to 3 stars out of 5 rating but an avoid recommendation to all except vampires.
02nd August, 2020
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Santos by Cartier

*This is a review of vintage Santos de Cartier

Santos opens with a moderately aromatic lavender and basil spice tandem before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart, a fine, natural smelling cedar note emerges melding with moderately sweet, smooth sandalwood rising from the base, supported by warm nutmeg and cumin spice. During the late dry-down the cedar takes the fore, with remnants of the warm spice and sandalwood adding a touch of supporting sweetness and balance through the finish. Projection is relatively minimal, and longevity on the low side of average at 7 hours on skin.

Santos is far from the typical powerhouse style compositions that were all the rage in the 80s. The composition sits relatively close to the skin, and unlike many of its bold, brash 80s contemporaries, it comes off as very classy and sophisticated. The sandalwood and cedar wood combination is the real focus, but the warm spice plays a large supporting role. With respect to the spice, when I detected cumin, I feared it would present like body odor as in many compositions containing it, but in Santos it is very natural smelling and in perfect balance with the woods and nutmeg, melding with the perfume ingredients sublimely. There is a soapiness that is most likely a derivative of the sandalwood but never calls too much attention to itself, just adding an additional touch of refinement. All-in-all the perfume is a winner to be sure, but I really wish it had better performance. I guess one can't have everything. The bottom line is the $30 per 30 ml bottle on the aftermarket vintage Santos de Cartier is an "excellent" 4 stars out of 5 rated anti-powerhouse perfume offering from the 80s that save for its lackluster performance metrics does just about everything else right, earning it a strong recommendation to vintage lovers seeking sophistication.

31st July, 2020
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Bois du Portugal by Creed

*This is a review of vintage Bois du Portugal

Bois du Portugal opens with a smoothed out aromatic bergamot and lavender tandem with natural smelling cedar support before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the natural cedar takes the fore, adding moderately sweet and slightly powdery supporting sandalwood and rubbing alcohol-like ambergris rising from the base, with the opening aromatic lavender remaining, now in an additional supporting role, adding a touch of sharpness to the woods. During the late dry-down the aromatics (both lavender and cedar) vacate, leaving the now relatively dry, slightly powdery sandalwood sans its earlier sweetness to take fore through the finish. Projection is very good, and longevity excellent at near 12 hours on skin.

Creed is a house that I rarely get along with. Most of the perfumes offered, save a couple notable exceptions that others rave about I find mundane and uninteresting at best, and outright disappointing at worst. Due to my many disappointments over the years with the house I put off trying Bois du Portugal for literally decades fearing I would find yet another Creed offering a bust... Having now sampled the original formula of Bois du Portugal on skin a handful of times, I can honestly say I was very wrong to avoid this one. The perfume draws one in immediately on application, as the aromatic lavender, bergamot and cedar wood meld together perfectly in a smooth almost liquid-like fashion. The segue to the slightly powdery woody heart is perfect, and some real sandalwood makes its way into the mix to add sweetness and balance. If there is a slight weakness to the perfume it is in the darker, relatively minimalist woody late dry-down that still smells quite good, but as the aromatics vacate, so does the distinctiveness to a degree. No, Bois du Portugal will not bowl anyone over with innovation, but it wholly succeeds at smelling pleasant and sophisticated at all times. As an aside, I have heard that the current stuff does not compare well to the original formula reviewed here, and if that is indeed true I would strongly recommend seeking the vintage out; this writer surely will! The bottom line is the $180 per 30 ml bottle on the aftermarket "excellent" 4 stars out of 5 rated vintage Bois du Portugal is a fine departure from the normally shoulder shrug worthy offerings from Creed, earning an easy recommendation to perfume lovers seeking a mature sophisticated woody composition.
19th July, 2020
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Kolonya by Rasei Fort

Kolonya opens with just a tinge of citric orange bergamot coupling with moderately sweet plum infused rosewood before quickly moving to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the bergamot vacates, leaving the plum infused rosewood to meld with slightly sweet, natural pipe tobacco and subtle jasmine and lavender florals with clove spice in support. During the late dry-down the tobacco and florals gradually diminish as smooth, slightly sweet amber takes the fore, bolstered by supporting natural cedar and sandalwood unveiled from the base through the finish. Projection is below average but longevity is excellent at around 12 hours on skin.

With a name like Kolonya, I really expected a different perfume profile than encountered, but in this case the change was a very pleasant surprise. The perfume turns out to be a fabulous mix of natural smelling tobacco, florals and woods that wear like an Eau de Cologne, but have impressive endurance. The perfume really focuses on the tobacco and woods primarily, but they never turn too deep or overpowering, adding a very different spin to the genre while keeping to the "easy to wear," casual presentation one might expect from an EdC. The late dry-down is probably the weakest aspect of the perfume, but even there the amber led finish never stands out in a bad way or gets too sweet as the cedar and sandalwood balance it nicely. I rarely mention bottles, but in this case the beautiful real wood bottle makes for exceptional housing, though the very wide "splash on" opening could indeed lead to *splashing* on the cologne unintentionally, so consider wearers forewarned. The bottom line is the $120 per 60 ml bottle "excellent" 4 stars out of 5 rated Kolonya may not be the typical Eau de Cologne expected, but instead the wearer gets a more distinctive offering that never veers *too* far from its historical "easy to wear" EdC peers, earning it an easy recommendation to just about anyone.
10th July, 2020
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MCM Success by MCM

MCM Success goes on with a ton of deep, musty oakmoss with significant animalic musk and dark, dulled rose support before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the super-strong oakmoss remains, as the animalic musk grows in strength to become co-star, now adding an alcoholic honey and smoky tobacco accord into the fold in significant support with hints of the previous dulled rose and now carnation florals. During the late dry-down the oakmoss gradually recedes, leaving remnants of the now diminished animalic honeyed musk sans booze to swap in just slightly sweet and powdery vanilla through the finish. Projection is excellent and longevity below average at around 5-6 hours on skin.

I have tried to warm to MCM Success, but alas it is not going to happen. I never thought I would say a composition had too *much* oakmoss, but there is no getting around it here. The wearer is inundated with the stuff immediately on application to skin, with the musk and relatively dry boozy honey from the base adding a highly off-putting odd gothic aspect not unlike what one might expect to smell in a crypt. The heart only exacerbates this dank, near rotting organic material accord to the point of the composition approaching scrubber territory though never quite reaching it. The late dry-down is thankfully much better composed and pleasant smelling in comparison, though most may have given up well before its arrival, and it is far from worth the early nose torture. The bottom line is the $100 per 100 ml bottle on the aftermarket MCM Success delivers the oakmoss goods in spades, though the "below average" 2 to 2.5 stars out of 5 rated 80's perfume goes *way* overboard with its liberal odd animalic musk and honeyed booze accompaniment that could scare away the dead, yielding an avoid recommendation to all but perfume loving necromaniacs.
08th July, 2020
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Aura for Women by Jacomo

Aura for Women opens with a light shampoo-like grapefruit and lychee driven accord before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the perfume turns fruity-floral, as sour, almost rotting raspberry fruit melds with peony and lily-of-the-valley light florals. During the late dry-down the composition turns musky and woody, as the fruity florals mostly vacate to reveal slightly sweet sandalwood and slightly animalic musk in the base, softened by supporting slightly powdery vanilla through the finish. Projection is excellent, as is longevity at around 12 hours on skin.

When first applied on skin Aura doesn't impress, as a weird relatively cheap smelling shampoo accord hits the wearer right off the bat. Things don't improve much directly afterwards, as the rather odd decaying fruity floral accord while not unpleasant still smells a bit "off." By this point I was convinced Aura for Women was going to be the sole perfume composed by the great Edouard Flechier that merited a pan, but then came the late dry-down to the rescue. It is rare that a perfume can be salvaged by the late dry-down when the rest disappoints, but Aura for Women is the exception, as Flechier skillfully uses a sandalwood and musk driven finish that smells quite good and also is distinctive enough to separate Aura for Women from its peers. The material quality of the perfume is generally poor, but Flechier makes the most of what was probably a very tight budget. The bottom line is the $11.50 per 75 ml bottle Aura for Women smells about as inexpensive as its relatively low price tag, but perfumer Flechier is far too talented not to work wonders even on a tight budget, yielding a "good" 3 stars out of 5 rated effort with a strong finish to counter its relatively poor start. This composition is only recommended to patient budget perfume seekers willing to wait hours for a payoff.
05th July, 2020
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Öland by Avon

*This is a review of early 1970's Oland.

Oland goes on with moderately sweet bergamot-laced smooth, almost liquid leather before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the bergamot vacates, as does most of the early sweetness, leaving the now slightly rugged leather as the focus, supported by warm nutmeg-like spice and an underlying musty labdanum and tobacco accord. During the late dry-down the composition eschews the remaining sweetness as the remnants of the leather and warm spice remain through the relatively brief finish. Projection is below average, as is longevity at around 4 hours on skin.

Oland is the kind of composition that definitely has strong roots to the past, but unlike many others of its time, something about the perfume comes off as "dated." I really enjoyed how the bergamot citrus meshed with the moderately sweet liquid leather early and would have loved for that accord to remain, but alas the composition quickly morphs into a warm, musty, spiced leather kind of thing with a slightly soapy bent that while far from unpleasant really is not particularly appealing. The potency of the composition should be mentioned as it is extremely watered down to the point that the 6 ounce bottle may not last as long as one might think as you need to really *splash* Oland on skin to get even passable performance. The bottom line is the $6 per 6 ounce bottle on the aftermarket "above average" 2.5 to 3 stars out of 5 rated Oland represents strong value, but proves only slightly compelling to collect, unless one covets the subjectively "cool" Packard Roadster collectable bottle a lot of it is housed in. Recommended for the nostalgic bottle, not particularly for the perfume.
04th July, 2020
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English Leather by Dana

*This is a review of the vintage English Leather Cologne by MEM.

English Leather opens with an aromatic lavender and bergamot tandem before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the aromatic lavender remains, joining natural smelling lemon, and orange, woody-green petitgrain early, then gradually adding a play doh-like accord with musky green oakmoss and hard leather late that as time passes eventually takes the fore. During the late dry-down, the play-doh accord and aromatic lavender vacate, as the remnants of the hard leather join significant sharp woody vetiver in the base that becomes co-star, with the musky-woody oakmoss accord now once again in support. Projection is below average, but longevity is quite tenacious at an excellent 12 hours on skin.

I have fond, vivid memories from my childhood where one could browse the grocery store personal care aisle and find many "drugstore" aftershaves and colognes like British Sterling, Jovan Musk for Men, Aqua Velva, Chaps... and of course, English Leather. There were testers galore, and while I had little money to buy just about anything, I always looked forward to sampling every one - again, and again. Fast forward to present day, with not having worn English Leather (aftershave or cologne) for at least 35 years and only my nostalgic memories to lean on, I decided to buy a vintage English Leather Cologne to see how the real thing measures up. Well, the top notes definitely are missing the nose piercing bergamot I remember from my youth (almost certainly burned off due to age), instead the bergamot, while present, is quite diminished in comparison to the aromatic lavender. I also don't remember the play doh-like accord in the heart, that when combined with the relatively hard leather gives off an overall smell not so unlike the current formula of Or Black. About two and a half hours in, the composition returns back to what I remember, as it morphs into its final sharp woody, leathery focus through the finish, with the vetiver giving the woods a piercing quality. Like most things it is almost impossible to live up to nostalgic long since past memories, and it holds true here too. That said, I don't regret the "cheapie" purchase, and still enjoy the stuff. The bottom line is the under $15 per 55 ml bottle English Leather Cologne (MEM version) may not live up to its impossible nostalgic heights, but the "good" to "very good" 3 to 3.5 stars out of 5 rated composition shows it holds up well nostalgia withstanding even after many decades, earning a solid recommendation to classic "old school" composition lovers who value getting excellent "bang-for-your-buck."
22nd June, 2020
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40 Rogue by Rogue Perfumery

40 Rogue opens with an odd, dark narcissus floral and rotting orange fruit led accord with underlying green oakmoss before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the rotting fruit gives way to an aldehydes spiked floral accord that is predominantly carnation with just a hint of rose. As time passes, the aldehydes become more and more assertive, as they meld with the carnation to become co-stars over time. During the late dry-down the aldehydes finally vacate to leave the remnants of the carnation to pair with only slightly animalic musk through the finish. Projection is below average, as is longevity at around 7 hours on skin.

This is a tough review to write... Not because the notes are particularly complex or difficult to pin down. No, it is tough because 40 Rogue is supposed to be a resurrection attempt of the long since discontinued 40 Love pour Homme by Jean Desprez. Not having sniffed 40 Love it is difficult to comment on whether the resurrection attempt is successful from a replication perspective. On this, I can only say that the aldehydic carnation accord is quite recognizable to a similar accord in many Desprez compositions I *have* sniffed. So maybe 40 Rogue succeeds in its attempt? Having said that, while potentially succeeding to resurrect 40 Love, if it smelled like this stuff, what a stinker it must have been! The open is completely off-putting, with its very bizarre mixture of narcotic florals and rotting fruit. While the open is horrific, the aldehydic carnation development which is substantially more appealing and near-surely on point to the original still is not much of a lure, nor is the musky late dry-down. Add in some relatively poor performance metrics and from a pure smell perspective 40 Rogue flops and is the least appealing offering from the house to the nose of this writer. The bottom line is the $125 per 60 ml 40 Rogue may be successful in its attempt to resurrect 40 Love, but if 40 Love smells like this "below average" 2 to 2.5 stars out of 5 rated mini-stinker, I would think it better off left dead, yielding an avoid recommendation to everyone except fans of 40 Love.
15th June, 2020
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Tuberose & Moss by Rogue Perfumery

Tuberose & Moss opens with with an only slightly indolic white floral tuberose supported by bright bergamot citrus and a tinge of relatively light green oakmoss before transitioning to its heart. As the composition reaches its early heart the slightly indolic tuberose remains the focus, with the green oakmoss taking a supporting role, melding with moderately powdery, slightly sweet vanilla rising from the base. During the late dry-down the tuberose remains, but yields to the now more potent relatively powdery slightly green oakmoss and vanilla mix that takes the fore through the finish sans sweetness. Projection is above average and longevity excellent at over 12 hours on skin.

I like Tuberose & Moss, but don’t love it. I am not much of a tuberose fan on a good day (at least not me personally wearing it) except when it is presented in a much lighter, brighter form like the presentation used in compositions like Champs Lunaires and Richard James Savile Row. Unfortunately here the balance is weighted for a good deal of the development towards the tuberose, and in a form that is darker than the aforementioned Champs Lunaires, but not as dark as Flos Mortis, with the oakmoss and vanilla providing quite a bit of powder late (a presentation choice of both notes that I dislike). I wish perfumer Cross would have focused more on the mossy green aspect of the oakmoss then its powdery facet as that would have been a better balance for the moderately dark tuberose. I enjoyed the composition more early-on, but as time passed the powder really got to me and my enjoyment diminished. The bottom line is the $140 per 60 ml bottle Tuberose & Moss impresses early but disappoints a bit late, yielding a "good" 3 stars out of 5 rating and a neutral recommendation except to tuberose and powder lovers who might find it a good match for their taste.
14th June, 2020
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Tabac Vert by Rogue Perfumery

Tabac Vert opens with a tinge of green oakmoss and sharp bergamot-laced relatively dry tobacco leaf before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the dry tobacco leaf remains, though gradually becomes obscured by a focal soapy leather accord with supporting floral carnation, and sandalwood and cedar rising from the base. During the late dry-down the tobacco completely vacates, as the soapy leather accord enhanced by supporting sandalwood and cedar remains, now thickened by what resembles slightly sharp, woody vetiver through the finish. Projection is above average and longevity excellent at over 12 hours on skin.

The name Tabac Vert is a bit of a misnomer for this perfume, as while there is some green early and there is also some tobacco neither really is the focus, at least not to the nose of this writer. At its core, Tabac Vert is a soapy leather focused composition, with the soapy leather not that unlike leather being scrubbed in saddle soap. The late dry-down may not actually have vetiver in it, but it sure smells like it does, and is not so unlike the vetiver infused leather of Private Label from Jovoy, though nowhere near as impressive. For me, this one is well-made but a bit of a shoulder shrug, and in the bottom third of the 11 perfumes I have sniffed from the house to date. The bottom line is the $125 per 60 ml bottle Tabac Vert is pleasant smelling, but the "good" 3 stars out of 5 rated composition is not impressive enough to warrant anything greater than a neutral recommendation to all.
13th June, 2020
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Flos Mortis by Rogue Perfumery

Flos Mortis goes on skin with a huge, highly indolic tuberose and jasmine white floral tandem, with an underlying menthol-like accord before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart, development stays linear as the highly indolic tuberose takes the fore with the jasmine remaining in support and the menthol-like accord vacates. During the late dry-down the tuberose remains, though now diminished, revealing just a touch of supporting hard leather in the base. Projection is excellent, as is longevity at over 12 hours on skin.

The name may scare many off even trying Flos Mortis, but in truth, while certainly a hard-core indolic tuberose composition all the way, it really is not off-putting, or at least not to this writer. That isn't to say Flos Mortis is an easy wear... You really need to *love* tuberose in all its indolic glory to enjoy wearing Flos Mortis, as the jasmine and the leather really only bolster the real star. It also doesn't help that the composition is fairly linear. I am not a deep indolic tuberose fan so Flos Mortis is not the kind of thing I would seek out myself, but if you love tuberose in all its indolic glory, the well-made, high quality Flos Mortis should certainly be on your short list of compositions to sniff. The bottom line is the $125 per 60 ml Flos Mortis may have a scary name, but the "very good" 3.5 stars out of 5 rated composition is much more accessible than expected, and certainly recommended to hardcore tuberose lovers in particular.
09th June, 2020
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Fougère L'Aube by Rogue Perfumery

Fougere L'Aube opens with a tinge of slightly sharp bergamot citrus, with a moderately sweet honeyed-green petitgrain and galbanum tandem in support before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart a fine aromatic lavender joins sharp, rosy-green geranium with a combination of the remaining green galbanum, hay-like coumarin and oakmoss from the base in support. During the late dry-down the composition stays relatively linear as the overall fern-like accord from the heart remains through the finish, with the green aspect gradually receding to unveil supporting relatively sweet, subtle sandalwood detectable in the base. Projection is average, and longevity above average at 9-10 hours on skin.

Due to IFRA regulations, real aromatic fougeres (complete with bergamot, oakmoss and "hay-like" coumarin) are a dying breed if not near-extinct. Luckily we have artisanal perfume houses like Rouge Perfumery that refuse to comply with the ridiculous genre killing IFRA guidelines, reminding us what the "real deal" actually smells like and keeping the category alive, if not still on life support. Fougere L'Aube is a fine example of what an aromatic fougere should smell like. It has all the ingredients one would expect to create the classic "fern-like" accord while never (thankfully) straying into modern fougere territory. The mossy-green oakmoss and hay-like coumarin in this case are more subdued, letting the rosy-green geranium take center stage in the heart to drive the relatively linear development. In the end, Fougere L'Aube breaks no new ground, but perfumer Cross has the classic fougere structure down to a tee, coupling great skill with the use of high quality ingredients, making for a fine outing regardless. The bottom line is the $125 per 60 ml bottle Fougere L'Aube may not plow new ground, but is one of the final true examples of a real classically structured aromatic fougere, presented wholly intact and crafted with fine skill and polish by perfumer Cross, earning a "very good" to "excellent" 3.5 to 4 stars out of 5 rating and a solid recommendation to old school aromatic fougere lovers lamenting IFRA destruction of the genre.
07th June, 2020
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Versace l'Homme by Versace

*This review is of the vintage original formula of Versace L'Homme.

Versace L'Homme opens with relatively bright, clean, lemony bergamot citrus with a hint of underlying floral carnation before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart, it turns slightly soapy as significant mossy-green oakmoss from the base joins the now co-starring carnation that takes on a slightly dry, dusty element, enhanced by a cinnamon spice infused supporting woody sandalwood and cedar duo, and sweetened by just a touch of vanilla and soft aromatic patchouli. During the late dry-down the floral aspects gradually recede, as the composition turns its focus to an unveiled, relatively soft leather hiding in the base that couples with the woody remnants and the now more prominent dry vanilla that adds light dusty powder through the finish. Projection is above average, but longevity is excellent at around 12 hours on skin.

Wow, there is a lot going on here as one can see from the more objective lengthy note breakdown above. At its core the composition is a relatively dry, dusty, woody perfume bolstered by significant oakmoss in the base. That said, the oakmoss never really is the focus, but rather used more as a binder to the relatively dry woods, floral aspects, and even the leather later-on. There is an almost soapy, grassy green nature to the perfume that presents much more prominently on paper than on skin. On skin, however, the dusty, woody elements are much more pronounced with the composition significantly less green. At the end of the day Versace L'Homme is a bit of a departure from the powerhouse compositions of the 80s, as it is much more well-behaved and never too brash. It is not really a barbershop type of perfume, but I suspect it will appeal to perfume enthusiasts that enjoy that classic composition style. The bottom line is the approximately $50 a 50 ml bottle on the aftermarket Versace L'Homme is a "very good" to "excellent" 3.5 to 4 stars out of 5 rated throwback perfume that relatively successfully combines an amalgamation of ingredients to yield a perfume that bucks the typical 80s powerhouse mold without veering too far astray; earning a solid recommendation to vintage perfume lovers looking for something with a bit more polish and less bravado than the super-bold powerhouse offerings that dominate the era.
30th May, 2020
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Sagamore by Lancôme

*This is a review of original formula vintage Sagamore.

Sagamore opens with significant aromatic lavender, infused with just a touch of light sanitized jasmine before moving to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart, the lavender vacates as a green geranium tinged rose and carnation floral tandem takes the fore with trace hints of the sanitized jasmine remaining in faint support, joined by mossy-green oakmoss rising from the base. During the late dry-down the composition turns decidedly green as the florals vacate, leaving the oakmoss to take claim as the focus through the finish with remnants of the sharp, green geranium to add a balancing additional lighter green touch. Projection is average but longevity excellent at well over 12 hours on skin.

Sagamore (vintage) has built a legion of fans over the years, and when coupled with its mid-80s release a blind buy seemed a relatively low risk endeavor. Now wearing the composition many times over on skin, the assumed low-risk has proved true - Sagamore is a winner. There are a lot of winners from the great 80s (my favorite decade for perfumery), so the *real* question is whether Sagamore stands out from the already strong field of its 80s peers, and that is much less of a "sure thing." The composition does not particularly smell complex or innovative to this writer... It is a well-crafted classically structured green aromatic all the way with a significant floral heart. Indeed the rose and carnation florals found in the composition's heart are probably the best thing about it, with the oakmoss and geranium keeping the "green" motif throughout. Once the florals vacate, the late dry-down smells good, but far from superior to so many others of its time. The bottom line is the $120+ per 50 ml bottle on the aftermarket original formula Sagamore impresses, but the "very good" 3.5 stars out of 5 rated composition doesn't really distinguish itself from its generally excellent peer group except in its higher cost, yielding a somewhat hesitant but positive recommendation to vintage 80s perfume lovers.
24th May, 2020
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Champs Lunaires by Rogue Perfumery

Champs Lunaires opens with a smooth coconut milk and airy non-indolic tuberose duo with just a hint of underlying rose before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the non-indolic airy tuberose takes the fore with the coconut milk and now more vociferous light rose remaining in support, coupling with a vague fruity citrus accord. During the late dry-down the tuberose gradually recedes as does the coconut milk, leaving the remnants of the fruity accord and gentle rose turning slightly powdery as they couple with barely detectable slightly sweet sandalwood from the base. Projection is average to above average, and longevity excellent at around 12 hours on skin.

At its core Champs Lunaires is a tuberose focused composition. Unlike the much more hardcore deep indolic tuberose of Flos Mortis from the same house, the stuff here is light, airy and enhanced by an equally airy, fruity rose that melds perfectly with the white floral. The coconut milk is immediately detectable on initial application and acts as a successful binder for the airy florals. I have worn this composition a number of times and like it more and more with every wear. That said, something in the back of mind screamed I had smelled a perfume in the same general vicinity previously, but just couldn't remember what it was... After putting my mind to it, I now realize that the general fragrance profile I was thinking of was the original formula of Richard James Savile Row. If you aren't familiar with Richard James, it is in the general mold of compositions like Dia Man from Amouage. No, Champs Lunaires does not smell exactly like Richard James, but the fruity non-indolic lighter tuberose presentation definitely is in the same ball park, exuding sophistication, subtlety and uber-luxury. As I love compositions like Dia Man and Richard James (owning vintage bottles of both) it should come as no surprise that I love Champs Lunaires as well. The bottom line is the $125 per 60 ml bottle Champs Lunaires is an "excellent" 4 stars out of 5 rated perfume that would smell great on anyone and is recommended to sophisticated light floral lovers of both genders.
16th May, 2020 (last edited: 17th May, 2020)
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Mousse Illuminée by Rogue Perfumery

Mousse Illuminee goes on skin with a brief blast of bracing wormwood as underlying tree moss is immediately detectable from the base before moving briskly to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the wormwood vacates, leaving the tree moss that ratchets up significantly to take on the focal role, significantly supported by a relatively transparent white musk and mossy-woody cypress tandem with underlying camphorous bay leaf and a touch of benzoin sweetness. During the late dry-down the composition stays linear with the slightly sweetened tree moss and cypress leading the way through the finish. Projection is excellent, as is longevity at well over 12 hours on skin.

I am not much of a tree moss lover, instead having a gargantuan preference for oakmoss, and unfortunately there is none here that I can detect (check out Rouge's stellar Chypre-Siam for what oakmoss smells like). As such, the tree moss focused Mousse Illuminee lost me near-immediately. That is not to say I believe the composition is not well-made and smells good, but as many compare Mousse Illuminee to vintage Polo, I confess I don't get the comparison, finding the composition all too dangerously close to vintage Drakkar Noir and particularly its semi-clone, vintage Caesars Man. I love vintage Caesars Man but honestly find it superior smelling with similar performance, and it cost me about $12 when I bought my 120 ml bottle years ago. The bottom line is the $125 per 60 ml Mousse Illuminee is a "good" smelling 3 stars out of 5 rated perfume that to me is superfluous when superior "cheapies" like the superior excellent smelling vintage Caesars Man can still be found on the after market for much less, yielding a neutral recommendation.
13th May, 2020
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Burberry for Men (Version #2) by Burberry

*This review is of the vintage 1992 version.

Burberrys for Men opens with fine bergamot citrus and aromatic lavender with hints of supporting mint and tarragon spice before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart remnants of the aromatic lavender remain, now in support of an unveiled natural cedar wood note that takes the fore, with slightly sharp woody vetiver, earthy patchouli, dulled carnation and rose florals and mint-like warm marjoram spice in additional support. During the late dry-down the warm spice and aromatic woods remain, now joining moderately hard leather and slightly animalic musk from the base through the finish. Projection is slightly below average, but longevity is excellent at between 13 and 15 hours on skin.

It took me a bit of time to completely warm to the 1992 version of Burberrys for Men. Oh, I always at least "liked" it, but something about the warm spice and aromatics just didn't quite click at first. That said, the more I wear the composition the more I find myself appreciating its seemingly endless list of ingredients that near-miraculously come together to smell quite good on the whole. The composition really isn't overly innovative, but the minty marjoram spice adds a special dimension to the aromatics in particular that set Burberrys apart from its long list of competitors from the early 1990s. If I had one wish, it would be to have the projection enhanced a bit, but that is a small "flaw" that I find easy to overlook when taking a macro view of the perfume results. The bottom line is the discontinued $150 per 50 ml bottle on the aftermarket Burberrys for Men (1992) is not the last word of what the best of 1990's perfumery has to offer, but the "very good" to "excellent" 3.5 to 4 stars out of 5 perfume is a winner that gradually makes its case for recommending a sample or even a full bottle buy.
11th May, 2020
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Nombre Noir by Shiseido

Nombre Noir opens with nose tingling aldehydes and smooth rosewood with just a hint of slightly sharp, citric lemony orange bergamot before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart fine white floral jasmine takes the fore with slightly dark rose, slightly powdery carnation and smooth yellow floral ylang-ylang in support. Additional support is provided by an ever-so slightly waxy orris butter and lemony-green geranium with a tinge of mildly sweet honey. During the late dry-down the florals all gradually recede with the rose now most prominent, turning slightly powdery as it joins a very subtle natural woody accord through the finish. Projection is average, as is longevity at around 8 hours on skin.

The elusive Nombre Noir has taken on near-legendary status over the years, being touted by some prominent names in perfume (one in particular) placing it as one of the all-time greats. I always wanted to try the perfume, but alas, the price of admission reached stratospheric levels in relative terms, making obtaining even a small sample a decent sized investment. Well, I finally "bit the bullet" and got my hands on a decant to try out, and here we are... This is one of the rare instances where I hoped I would dislike the composition due to its lofty cost, but alas, it really is *incredible* smelling. The first thing that grabbed me was the jasmine. This is some very good quality stuff that is not unlike the fine jasmine used in X for Men by Clive Christian, but even higher quality. The rose, which ultimately becomes the focal note in the perfume transitions so seamlessly from the jasmine I barely realized what had happened. In fact, the entire composition is about class, finesse, restraint and most of all balance. It is the balance of an amalgamation of its laundry list of high quality materials that makes Nombre Noir such an absolute marvel. I barely mention even a small fraction of the ingredients primarliy because they all complement each other so well and just meld together perfectly. So in the end, instead a hopeful pan, I ended up with an immediate hunt for my own admittedly crazy expensive bottle. The bottom line is the extremely rare and long since discontinued $1350 per 60 ml bottle on the aftermarket Nombre Noir is a near-perfect chypre from the great, late perfumer Jean-Yves Leroy that approaches a "masterpiece" rating of 4.5 to 5 stars out of 5 and an easy recommendation to at least secure a small sample. Everyone needs to at least sniff Nombre Noir once in their lifetime.
05th May, 2020 (last edited: 10th May, 2020)
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Oud Malaki by Chopard

Oud Malaki opens with a slightly sweet warm spiced tobacco before moving to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the tobacco vacates, leaving the slightly sweet, smooth saffron and clove led warm spice to co-star with a faux Oud/dark woody accord with just a hint of underlying aromatic lavender in subtle support. During the late dry-down the spice recedes, leaving its remnants to pair with the now subdued synthetic dark woods through the finish. Projection is excellent, and longevity outstanding at around 15 hours on skin.

I blind bought a bottle of Oud Malaki many years ago after learning my favorite perfumer Dominique Ropion was behind the composition and my bottle seemingly has been in stasis ever since as I worked through my ever-growing perfume backlog. After finally getting around to wearing it again many years after purchase, I'm reminded of the positive first impression it made on its arrival from overseas back then. While I would like to say that the composition was comprised of real Oud, I'm afraid at this price-point that would be a near impossible feat, and sure enough, the perfume has the trademark fingerprints of nagermatha to approximate the Oud wood, and norlimbanol (sigh) for the vague dark synthetic woods. I am really not a fan of either of these ingredients, but under Ropion's skillful hand, disaster is deftly averted by balancing the woods with some relatively warm, smooth spice that is just as much the focus as the (fake) Oud, maybe more. There is also a hint of sweetness that permeates the composition's relatively linear development after the tobacco led open, but the sweetness never approaches anywhere near "yellow flag" territory even to the sweet averse like this writer. At the end of the day, Oud Malaki may not take the ridiculously crowded Oud genre to new heights, but it does ultimately impress for what its worth. The bottom line is the $67 per 80 ml bottle Oud Malaki may not be particularly innovative, but perfumer Ropion tames the worst aspects of its relatively inexpensive ingredients, yielding a "very good" 3.5 stars out of 5 rated result that is recommended to fans of warm spicy-woody compositions like Royal Oud from Creed.
03rd May, 2020 (last edited: 11th May, 2020)
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Joy by Jean Patou

*This review is of the vintage original formula of Joy with only reference to the current formulation, solely for comparison.

Joy (vintage) opens with slightly sparkling nose tingling aldehydes, with deep, smooth peach coupled with supporting rose and carnation florals before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the aldehydes vacate, replaced by moderately powdery ylang-ylang that joins remnants of the peach now taking a supporting role as the carnation infused rose takes the fore in a big way. During the late dry-down the rose remains, now co-star to a musky-woody accord in the base through the finish. Projection is average, as is longevity at around 9 hours on skin.

The house of Jean Patou has an amazing history. In my mind the house belongs right beside the all-time greats. That said, a good deal of the house's prestige occurred during the tenure of Jean Kerleo as its great master perfumer. While the more recent praise is wholly warranted, the house was churning out winners all the way back in the early to mid 1900's, and Joy by Henri Almeras is a fine example of its early success. Joy is a stunning amalgamation of peach-laced sparkling aldehydes and rose, carnation and ylang-ylang natural smelling airy florals with just the right amount of powder that never goes over-the-top. The carnation may actually not be in the composition at all, but certainly the way the rose combines with the peach and ylang-ylang gives off a distinct carnation-like accord that smells incredible. I have heard from many that this is a great example of jasmine in perfume, but alas I must be anosmic to whatever the perfumer used (or my skin is just eating it up), because I really don't get any to speak of, with the rose dominating on my skin. No matter, the composition fares just fine without it. As a quick aside, my bottle of Joy is an early vintage, but I purchased a sample of the current formula just to see how the perfume held up... Wearing the two side-by-side, the current formula lacks some of the depth of the rose found in the vintage, but the two smell quite similar through the mid-section. The big difference is with the performance. The current stuff disappears after about five hours, not displaying much of a base, whereas the vintage has much better staying power. The bottom line is the $65 per 50 ml on the aftermarket Almeras composed vintage Joy may not quite reach Kerleo's latter heights for the house, it certainly is a fine example of perfumery in its own right earning an "excellent" 4 to 4.5 stars out of 5 rating and a easy recommendation to classic rose lovers in particular.
02nd May, 2020 (last edited: 05th May, 2020)
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Jasmin de Chérifa by L’Atelier Français des Matières

Jasmin de Cherifa opens with an extremely brief splash of near-transparent thin, airy rose before moving to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart, the thin rose quickly moves well into the background as light and airy sanitized jasmine takes over as sole star with little else presenting. During the late dry-down, the jasmine remains, sans rose and its more airy facet, now a skin scent through the finish. Projection starts average, but quickly turns minimal, with longevity below average at 6-7 hours on skin.

There really isn't much to say about Jasmin de Cherifa. The composition is a pleasant jasmine soliflore that only shows the non-indolic facet of the jasmine. Instead of its indolic side, the wearer gets an airy and light but rather sedate presentation of the white floral with a more "feminine" feel to it. I usually don't like to use words like "masculine" and "feminine" in perfume reviews, but in this particular case, the way the perfumer chose to present this specific light and sanitized profile of the usually more lush and indolic white floral really does strike me this way (though I still feel anyone can wear it). The only other note of any consequence (and it barely is noticeable) is a very subtle transparent rose that lends the slightest of support to the starring jasmine. The bottom line is the $210 per 30ml bottle Jasmin de Cherifa is a high quality, but all too linear and simplistic presentation of one of my favorite notes, earning a "good" to "very good" 3 to 3.5 stars out of 5 rating and a hesitant recommendation to jasmine lovers. It should be noted that while price did not factor into my review rating as always, if price is considered, the $7 per ml cost is hard to swallow when so many less expensive superior jasmine perfumes are available.
25th April, 2020