Perfume Reviews

Reviews by flathorn

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Total Reviews: 338

Vanille d'Iris by Ormonde Jayne

A just-right, cosmetic-note of a languid powdered iris. It floats around my person like a sophisticated, seemingly casual affectation. It is somewhat like a Chanel in that way.

Pleasant and pleasurable. How could someone not feel enveloped and polished in it, a little coddled, a little sexy? Not brash or in your face, it invites people to come to you, not like those fragrances that force your attention. In other words not loutish or histrionic.

A purr of a fragrance. Feminine and self-possessed.

Note: This fragrance makes my cat a little aggressive. He will bit and claw when he smells it.
07th November, 2019

Gothic Censored / Gothic Angel by O'Driý

I like conceptual fragrances, the type OíDriý seems to favor in the ones I sampled so far. I donít have the advantage of knowing what those concepts are, really, so Iím left on my own, like I was with ĎItalian Angelí. I donít mind too much as I can spin them anyway I please, which is fun.

ĎItalian Angelí was a monstrously enveloping, gustatory, loud fragrance wrapped with sensual/sexual elements that sort of ate me alive. I envisioned the city of Rome, unwashed, shouting at the top of its voice. Unfortunately, with ĎGothic Angelí I may be having a reaction to an aroma chemical thatís skewing this far afield to my nose. Iím not picking up certain elements the other two reviewers noted, so I may have to go my own way with it.

On my skin itís an aldehydic incense, kind of too high, singing to the heaven, and too low, brooding in a gothic somberness. The donít seem to have a connection to each other, though they certainly influence each other. The alto sitting next to you would certainly influence your bass. Iím sort of missing the elements in between and Iím left wondering - is it my nose, or is this the way íGothic Angelí is structured? When Iím in this arena, which I find myself in often enough, I have the urge to apologize because the notes are more important in conceptualized fragrances. So I tend to not review them.

The picture I get is of polarization and excess - over the top gothic art shouting to the heavens, its soul sunk in the deepness of a dark past, trying by loud excess to lift itself out of the gloom it has put itself in. So, this fragrance isnít very modulated on me, quite black and white. I have to say thereís certain aroma molecules that I react to in exactly this fashion, going very high, kind of gassy, obliterating nuance and itís likely this is happening here. So Iíll give it that benefit of the doubt. But it remains unwearable on me, even while kind of liking it.
29th October, 2019

Rose Atlantic by D.S. & Durga

First off, I like the name - it conjures up a certain feel for me, and is the reason I tried it. Iíve tried plenty of others for the same reason that didnít pan out, but Rose Atlantic did. Itís a light, fresh sea-air rose, delicate, subtle and long-lasting. It has a windswept smell you envision in shore dunes.

The sea air isnít marine - seaweed and wet tide - but dune grass and salt spray. It has a very nice bright bergamot and lemon beginning - quite airy and fresh that easily transitions into a linden and rose dry grass and sand smell.

This is a subtle fragrance, one Iím considering as a travel fragrance, neutral enough for airplanes, airports and hotels, with no aldehydes or powder - the two things most people object to in daily life. If anyone bumped up against your aura or person, they would be met with a slight rose sea-air fragranced skin scent, the volume which I would like to meet fellow travelerís fragrances.

Long-lasting but a skin scent for half its life.
20th October, 2019 (last edited: 29th October, 2019)
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Velvet Splendour by Goldfield & Banks

Oh, the cheekiness to create such a decadent symphonic ornament in the 21st century. I find its powdered effusive smooth mimosa opulence irresistible. It has a unique floral accord Iím beguiled by. Though itís made in Australia, the ethos is pure grand old-school French. I enjoy reveling in its opulent personality.

The Australian mimosa (Wattle) is the heart of this fragrance, supported by orange blossom and jasmine that work admirably. And, thereís no rose, which is usually like leaving something out. But itís so satisfying here and I find myself smelling it often on my arm just to kind of take it in. Thereís a subliminal rusticness to the wattle and doesnít need rose to dress it up with those damascones.

Itís a luxurious oriental with spicy elements adding zest to the warm yellow tones, but itís by no means a spicy fragrance - they increase its solar character. Velvet Splendour reminds me of the ethos of the MDCI perfume line of baubles, and think it would be at home there.

In the heart, a burnish of leather appears on the golden petals, but itís not a leather fragrance. It deepens Velvet Splendour a bit, and finds a certain resonance with the floral notes, a light-handed suntan of a leather note. The drydown doesnít get darker or stray from itís linear opulent idea. Long-lasting.

Though Iím quite fascinated by it, and love the semi-rustic floral accord at its heart, Iím having a hard time imagining where I could wear it. You need to have some aplomb to pull it off well, other than haunting the theater. But I need to try and find a decant, just so I can have it around. Worth sampling for its unique floral personality and beauty. A quintessential elevator bomb and to have entire sections of the movie house to yourself. But very lovely.
02nd October, 2019 (last edited: 15th July, 2020)

What We Do In Paris Is Secret by A Lab on Fire

I usually canít do a fragrance justice based on one wearing. I may have a slow nose, because Iíve often amended my opinion based on a second wearing. What We Do In Paris was like that.

The first time around I got the delectable, honeyed floral-foody aspect and thought it quite personable, though nothing that was going to change the line-up of my current perfume loves. The second time I tried it, wow, the sensual-sexy aspect came out with a vengeance. It takes all that French-Guerlain old style vanilla/heliotrope/ rose/ambergris pastry vibe, and creates a delectable kittenish purr (fur, little claws and all). Foody fragrances mostly fail me - they need to have connection with more parts than alimentary.

It has a nice lingering drydown, at least seven hours, in the same vein as the rest of the fragrance, growing more subtle as it ages.

This particular subtle sexy note is also present for me in Agent Provocateur, and underneath the louder aspects, is what really drives that one for me - I feel the purr in both these. Thereís a reason for the term sex kitten. Very nice.
01st October, 2019 (last edited: 02nd October, 2019)

Elie Saab Le Parfum by Elie Saab

I tried this a few years ago and passed on it - it was too pretty, too floral, and never hit below the belt, with little desire to present anything other than a pleasing persona to the world.

But trying it now, I admit to myself it really is a glorious orange blossom-centric honeyed radiance that speaks of summer, with a lack of aldehydes and hairspray. Itís all well-done, cohesive, sweet-tempered. Itís charming and in my perfume world, a people pleaser.

I canít fault it for more than being constructed to stay in a pretty box, not straying any direction other than eternal smiling summer. I feel curmudgeonly to say itís not a real summer, with grass, dirt, water, mosquitoes and slouching about, but the eternal summer garden party. Because there are plenty of abstract floral I donít have this quibble about, but like babsbendix said it has a WASPish ethos to it. Thereís no dark bits to intrigue me, itís always well-put together and has immaculate hair, but as long as thatís understood, Elie Saab is lovely and always appropriate.

My dilemma is how to rate ones like this, considering I get a little Jekyll/Hyde about it. It has a classic, well-made feel and seems it will be perennially popular, even though the ethos may be a little dated. It will be entirely serviceable when I have need of it. But itís never one Iíll hang out and share my secrets with. Still, thumbs up.
30th September, 2019

Wakely by Abercrombie & Fitch

Itís hard to be offended at Wakely because itís pretty, light, pleasing and agreeable. Iím a bit of a fragrance snob I guess, because if it had the name Hermes on it I would have taken this more seriously. But really, this is a nice summer-light fragrance. Kind of pale, with a subtle citrus opening, floral-hay heart, and pale ambery drydown. What made it work for me was the transparent Gardenia - it was a little different than the usual rose-light or jasmine-light.

It has a sort of familiar smell to it, and not a distinct character, so itís like watching a beauty pageant, and afterward not quite being able to tell them apart or remember them. But they are pretty...

I canít think of a place this wouldnít work except a Goth convention. It has no hairspray, ozone or aldehydes. The definition of safe. Not real long-lasting, perhaps 3 hrs.
29th September, 2019

Pure Musc for Her by Narciso Rodriguez

After falling in love with Narciso, Iím exploring the rest of the line. Most are very pleasing except for the two original Narciso Rodriguez fragrances, which never worked for me.

Their lines of flankers make sense, sort of what flankers should really be about, though I find the names confusing and wish they werenít so muddied. Thereís a similarity in the flankers of course - though I like them, I have a bit of difficulty separating them. But I wonít complain further, as a plethora of riches shouldnít be discouraged.

ĎPure Musc for Herí is beautifully done. And it has a difference on my skin from the rest, being quite cool and centered on greener white florals. The note pyramid from another site also lists Woodland Lily (Muguet), Lilac, White florals, Almond and Powder, which feels right. I donít care for white floral fragrances, so Iím sort of left wondering how this one managed to draw me in.

Except I love the balance in it, like marveling at a high-wire act, which it is for me. A mis-step in a white floral/green fragrance puts me right in perfume hell. So thereís a built-in tension I feel which adds to my interest.

It has a smooth, clean soapy musk note that manages to feel cushiony and soft. Combined with the green florals, it has a rightness Iíve just never felt with others that try this. I like this fragrance, but also admire it. It has a smooth cool floral abstracted bouquet, abstraction being a quality I like more and more in fragrances. It may be one reason this works for me - itís blended, almost seamless, in the manner of Narciso Rodriguez fragrances, not about the notes.

This has a refined cool elegance, but isnít an ice queen, because of that perennially appealing NR sensual musk, which does wonders for a cool white floral. It presents the sensual beating heart I search for beneath the exterior of frigid white florals and frigid little muguet. Yet the musk is not behind or beneath. Itís blended, like friends. So it comes across as sort of gracious, sort of restrained, sort of sensual, sort of romantic, and in all that self-possessed. I like this one quite a bit.
25th September, 2019 (last edited: 26th September, 2019)

Bianca by Tocca

Light sparkling citrus lavender opening, an airy rose-green tea heart, and a delicately musky drydown. The sugar listed in the pyramid isnít apparent, not even as a Ďsweetened muskí. Uncomplicated, light, clear, soft and pretty.

These are easy to overlook, but Bianca is longer lasting than I thought it would be, and nice. For the price, I doníít mind spraying twice, but Iím not sure itís entirely necessary.

If a person wanted to wear a scent on an airplane (which I usually donít recommend), ĎBiancaí might work.
20th September, 2019 (last edited: 21st September, 2019)

Florida Water by Murray & Lanman

I was a little surprised to see this marketed as an actual cologne, because Iíve only seen it used during ceremonies, but hey, why not? It does smell nice and refreshing. My review is for the Florida Water which comes from Peru. Less water, more resin.

The use Iíve seen is in shamanic ritual, when the shaman takes Florida Water into their mouth and sprays it into the aura of the person standing in front of them for ritual cleansing during ceremony. Iíve participated in this traditional cleansing, but as for an actual fragrance, itís spicier than Bay Rum, and light and natural. It has the effect of refreshing and energizing, so I can see why someone would love to wear this everyday. It couldnít help but be a positive thing for the body. So I got some for personal use, as a morning or summer scent.
19th September, 2019 (last edited: 04th October, 2019)

Tucson / Arizona by Olympic Orchids

The name has changed to Tucson, as several have noted.

Itís a satisfying, easy-wearing take on the natural aroma of desert plants that my husband likes. I gave it to him when we visited Tucson, and yes, it had a great resonance when he wore it there. Conifer, aromatic resins, in a sharp, dry, dusty combination makes this fragrance invigorating, dry and uplifting.

This sounds generic, but itís surprising how few old-styled straightforward outdoorsy, conifer, woody, aromatic fragrances there really are, especially for the good price of this one. Approachable and naturalistic; without powder or ozone.

Tucson is likeable and easy to wear, so I donít hesitate to recommend it to a friend looking for something of this description. I like smelling it on my husband because it smells like the desert.
14th September, 2019 (last edited: 03rd October, 2019)

DK Collection Iris by Donna Karan

A very pretty lighthearted May Rose, barely-powdered iris, light Magnolia and bare touch of violet opening. I was conflicted about this pretty iris because of its lasting power. I donít need great longevity, but the wonderful naturalistic air was fairly ephemeral and faded appreciably until it was gone by the 3 hour mark. I see itís discontinued now and probably for good reason.

For the price of the fragrance, I was left wanting a whole lot more, or actually I wanted a lot more of the same, because I found it a lovely and joyful iris.
14th September, 2019

Coeur de Vťtiver Sacrť by L'Artisan Parfumeur

A Vetiver fragrance that isnít Ďvetiver-centricí yet somehow manages to use the vetiver to achieve a spiritual space. Vetiver is usually paired with wood, herbs or citrus. Here itís paired with dried fruits. LíArtisan has two other fragrances that use dried fruit, ĎAl Oudhí and ĎTraversee du Bosphoreí, and more than that which highlight vetiver, and several with the ĎTea for Twoí notes. This one fits their line-up and their ethos well. In spite of comments about sharing notes with other LíArtisan fragrances, Coeur de Vťtiver Sacrť, brings something new and good to the table.

CDVS has a dried fruit vibe but it isnít about being a gourmand. Itís more a part of the ambiance. Vetiver takes it into black tea territory and out of the dense hole dried fruit chords can go. As it ages it starts drying to a smoky green vetiver, dry spice, incense and tea.

Itís an evocative fragrance, not abstract, so itís about where it takes me - this is in the Eastern fantasy vein. This is the meditation hut, the simplicity of smoky tea, incense and dried fruits. Rain on the roof intensifies the dry, still space inside, supporting an inward journey. Itís surprising a fragrance with fruit would do that, but there it is. I love this space.

Thereís a certain amount of nitpicking about this fragrance, over the name (which works for me), about whatís expected of it. Sometimes perfume lovers can be too much in their heads and miss the point of a fragrance. Especially evocative ones. Just go with this one. Itís too bad it got discontinued, as itís more complex than what it might seem.
12th September, 2019 (last edited: 14th September, 2019)
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Chinchilla by Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

This is a fragrance I should love, but barely like because of the carnation. Iíve never cared for carnation fragrances, that spicy clove floral, and itís an integral part of this fragrance, interwoven until the end, part of its soul.

It is well-made and solid, somewhat unique with its warming honey and animalistic undertones beneath an upfront carnation, so I definitely donít give it a thumbs-down. Some may find this smashing. But it can never work for me.

Iíve tried it in both summer and fall, and Chinchilla is a cool weather fragrance as the name and notes imply.
06th September, 2019

Winter by Dasein

Wow, this fragrance is getting a lot of positive comments about the authentic conifer notes, but my experience is exactly the same as the most recent review below, by ccw. I have to wonder if there hasnít been a reformulation. ĎWinterí smells exactly like a Yankee Candle Christmas candle - not the pure scent of forest conifers, but the ones blended with that sugarplum note that spells Ďholidayí.

The candles smell kind of nice burning during the holidays in the house, but I donít care to wear it really - just too much of a crossover from functional fragrance. I canít get the connection out of my head.

I think it smells better as a candle. Itís a little unsettling when such dead-ringer crossover fragrances are offered as Indy originality. Even more unsettling though, may be that this is the new wave of the future. Is it bad? No. But I want to smell a little more human, and have some space between me and those holiday sugarplums.
05th September, 2019 (last edited: 26th September, 2019)

Sťville ŗ l'Aube by L'Artisan Parfumeur

Probably my favorite petitgrain fragrance. ĎSťville ŗ líAubeí gives it a great naturalistic air, with orange blossom for a perfect floral accent, and lavender grounding it a little into more of an ambient fragrance, rather than going Ďfloralí or Ďspringtimeí.

It is all those things, pleasantly green, pleasantly floral and pleasantly medicinally lavender. On my skin it tips the balance toward the floral. Nice, kind of classic.
05th September, 2019 (last edited: 12th September, 2019)

Fatale / Fatale Black by Agent Provocateur

I see this one gets good reviews, which I wish was the case for me, but on me itís way too synthetic, of the department store variety, and yes, derivative. I donít really mind derivative if itís a fragrance I like. But if itís one I donít like, derivative becomes one more log on the fire.

Iíve come to a peace with the fact I have a bad reaction to what must be a very common aroma-chemical in contemporary perfumes, which makes many smell hairsprayish and artificial. And especially mainstream fragrances - there must be a cheap base or cheap chemical that says Ďperfumeí in that world which they use by the bucket-load. Because I never had this reaction to vintage fragrances. They all wore well - it was more a matter of deciding which ones you liked best. But thatís just the way things are now with fragrances for those like me. It makes it a requirement for me to test before buying because there are no guarantees, except with non-IFRA perfumers.

There is one thing I can say about Fatale. I keep trying flankers of the original Agent Provocateur, which I like, to find an A.P. Lite I can wear during the day, but find most of them artificial. The one I finally found that can be called A.P. Lite is actually ĎHippie Roseí by Heeley, lol, so I think Iíll quit trying to find one among the AP flankers. Fatale doesnít share even a smidgeon of dna with the original.
27th August, 2019 (last edited: 04th October, 2019)

Night Veils : La Botte by Byredo

ĎLa Botteí is a stiletto boot. Plush leather, dirty jasmine, violet accomplice, and an insistent background pulse of a rubber-like note. The first Byredo that has worked for me or that I like. When violet is used like this, in the company of notes that have gone dark or petroleum, it creates an impression of Ďwilling to play dark, but pure at heartí. An affecting contrast. The notes in this fragrance donít settle in to a compromise, but play their separate sounds all night, sweet jasmine dirge in a minor key. It really speaks to the feminine soul that is yearning for something beyond or below. Love it.
27th August, 2019 (last edited: 02nd September, 2019)

Not a Perfume by Juliette Has a Gun

Iím glad I tried ďNot A PerfumeĒ because now I know which molecule is to blame for very, very many of my bad reactions to perfumes. It feels like a small victory knowing this, even though few perfumes list it in their pyramid.

ďNot A PerfumeĒ consists only of Cetalox and ethanol, which is in the same family as Ambroxan. Zealot Crusader below did a good job in his review explaining the ins and outs of ambroxides. I can add that I react distinctly different to this one with Cetalox, than ďMolecule 02Ē with Ambroxan.

Cetalox smells on my skin like a sort of harsh abrasive ďfreshĒ note, one Iíve smelled a lot in menís fresh fragrances. One that stands out for me was ĎAventus for Womení, where this note ruined the fragrance for me. Itís used a lot in detergents, apparently because of its clean, crisp quality. On me it is beyond crisp, more in the ozonic category, quite unpleasant.

Being able to piece this together was helpful, but as a fragrance...yeah, whatever.
21st August, 2019 (last edited: 02nd September, 2019)

Santal Royal by Guerlain

Good god, this is awful stuff! The high falsetto oud made this intolerable, but even if it performed at lower than a shriek, I struggled to find any sandalwood. Instead, whatever chemicals they cynically used smells like artificial sandalwood/ rose scented lacquer painted on some fake oud pressboard to invoke the gravitas of both.
12th August, 2019 (last edited: 02nd September, 2019)
10th August, 2019

York No 7 by Yeye Parfums

Y.O.R.K. No. 7 is a good everyday fragrance. Long-lasting and minimalist.

It has a great non-perfumey neutral, soap-edged opening. Thereís a enigmatic urban masculine vibe to it, like a freshly-showered and shaved man stepping onto the concrete sidewalk from his apartment. I keep seeing high rises and steel, asphalt and clean gray surfaces. I would really like smelling its edgy, clean minimalism on a man in an office.

It comes across different than the note pyramid. The grapefruit is not grapefruity, the mint is not minty. Heliotrope, orris and violet leaf sound somewhat Guerlain, but produce an orris impression that is clean, dry, and wrung free of sentiment, and seems to really drive the spare sophisticated vibe Iím getting.

After several hours the big soapy edge starts settling down but doesnít go away. It follows through with its theme until the end, a sort of spare clean neutrality. The drydown notes become a more simplistic version of it, a little sharper, with the emergence of a clean, non-billowy white musk coolness. It lasts most of a working day.

It reminded me of the first part of Santal 33, with its enigmatic city vibe, but has a cooler drydown than the warm one in Santal 33. I liked it and am buying a decant for my husband.

Update: The musk in it can be variable. In warmer temperatures, the musk becomes warmer and more noticeable. I prefer it when the musk stays cool.
26th July, 2019 (last edited: 10th August, 2019)

Fucking Fabulous by Tom Ford

Fucking fair-to-middling.
17th July, 2019

Patchouli Patch by L'Artisan Parfumeur

Affable and easy-going.
You hear a lot about the degree to which a patchouli fragrance may or may not have a hippie vibe, a ranking system as to how far it it diverges from old-style patchouli oil. Patchouli oil is a victim of its own success, its sublime representation of an entire generational ethos. Itís hard to understand the power it held unless you participated in it.
The perfume world in the 60ís was mostly mainstream house fragrances. There wasnít the wide choice available now, of naturalistic, mainstream and niche fragrances. As good as they were, they represented an older era that wasnít quite working for the younger generation, just like patchouli now represents an older era. The Ďhippieí movement, which wasnít called that back then, and was far more complex, widespread, and multi-faceted than the caricature that is presented now, was primarily a desire of the generations starting to graduate from high school to seek a more authentic, individualistic, down-to-earth approach to their life and living, a reaction to being smothered in the white picket fence aspirations of their parents, the World War II generation who wanted security and conformity and embraced Tupperware, girdles for women, and not letting your kink show. Patchouli was the perfect fragrance of rebellion - rough, natural, down-to-earth, sensual, a little dirty. Parents didnít like the fragrance at all, which made it ideal.
I have a seminal memory of it. We were attending a meeting about changes to the educational system. Sitting in the auditorium, I smelled a wild fragrance behind me - like earth and tobacco and decaying leaves, very pungent, very rough and compelling. Then a guy walked past me, a god. He had long dark, curling hair touched with copper from the sun, a tie-dye shirt, a strand of love beads on a leather thong around his neck (which werenít purchased back then, only hand-made and gifted). He wore sandals and Levi 101ís with the side seam ripped out and paisley panels sewn in to make bell-bottoms. Lanky and mellow, he floated by - a vision, a god, a ray of sunlight in the button-down intellectual atmosphere of the proceedings - reeking of an in-your-face Dionysian fragrance Iíd never smelled. It was a revelation. He was a revelation.
The contrast couldnít have been more defined, the introduction to patchouli better. Appropriate? No. Wild? Yes. Itís raw sensuality was an embarrassment in any establishment setting. There was no way to downplay it. Unadulterated dark patchouli oil couldnít be worn in any establishment setting by any establishment person. The contrast was too jarring. The mould didnít fit. That was the whole point.
Fast forward decades later to a different time and place. Everyone is aware of patchouli now and the creaky association with the word Ďhippieí (yikes). You have to call a group and movement something to define them, but it always ends up being a box. It was a banal term, the one that stuck. What do you do with patchouli to get it away from itís 60ís associations? ďPatchouli PatchĒ. A patchouli for everyone.
Itís intent was successful. Itís warm, friendly, easy-going, relaxed and very accessible. I find it easy to wear. Itís a fragrance that communes with your body aspect, makes you comfortable in your skin. Wear patchouli oil for sex, wear Patchouli Patch when you step out of the bedroom.
Since it was created, patchouli has really come into its own in fragrance and you can find it presented in many fantastic, creative ways, but thereís few homier than Patchouli Patch.
Long may itís tribe increase.
11th July, 2019 (last edited: 13th August, 2019)

Lismore by Waterford

Itís tagline calls Lismore the most romantic fragrance in the world. I expected to dislike it from that alone, as its genre, light aldehydic romantic floral, isnít my favorite. But I happened to try it in what I believe is the exact perfect venue for - a warm outdoor summer wedding. It surprised me how well it fit in, how appropriate it felt.

It has a resonance with cut crystal - itís like a vase of flowers in Lismore crystal. It is a quite neutral, abstracted, light aldehydic fragrance that smells like what a wedding dress looks like. One of its pros is that, even though musk is listed as an ingredient, I didnít smell any at all in the hot outdoor air, a scenario that always brings out the smelly side of musk in some of my favorite fragrances. So Lismore can be expected to perform pretty much like you want at a function like this - adding to the air of convivial romanticism with its traditional aldehydic florals, and its neutrality ensuring you wonít upstage the bride.

This isnít an autumn or winter fragrance. I suspect it will smell insipid then. If I had smelled it in cooler weather, I would have passed on it. If Waterford positioned this fragrance purposely, for the venue I attended, it was a clever idea, whether it failed or not. How many times have we angsted over what to wear to a wedding? But even being tailor-made for this niche, I think thereís probably plenty of similar venues it would do fine in. I donít know how Waterford marketed their fragrance, but minis of Lismore with their cute little bottles positioned with their crystal would be irresistible - itís easier to impulse buy a mini of a special-event fragrance.

It isnít my type of fragrance, but itís successful for its niche, getting the entire style right. And most importantly, it saved me from perfume inappropriateness.
27th June, 2019 (last edited: 15th August, 2019)

Bella by Vince Camuto

I received this at Christmas as part of a three-perfume Vince Camuto gift set. The person who gifted it to me knew I like fragrances and was convinced by the SA in the shop he purchased it from that these were very popular and well-liked. Lol.

Kind of a cliche of a fragrance because it and its two setmates, Capri and Amore, were everything you think of that defines modern mainstream shopping mall fragrances. Light, hairsprayish, chemical roses, fruits and woods. I canít call them horrid, but I donít call them pleasant. Itís another iteration of the chemical cloud that has become cheap perfumes; no, not just cheap ones, but acceptable mainstream perfumes. Itís hard to believe a person would purposely choose this to wear, except it matches what weíve come to expect of our fragrances, so itís acceptable and would fit in anywhere. That can be a powerful incentive for a person just looking for a fragrance to match others. Even the artificial tone of it is acceptable now. But at the very least, I would turn that person on to La Vie Est Belle by LancŰme, an acceptable mainstream feminine fragrance of this stripe.

I will probably give this exact same review to Capri and Bella.
27th June, 2019

Capri by Vince Camuto

I received this at Christmas as part of a three-perfume Vince Camuto gift set. The person who gifted it to me knew I like fragrances and was convinced by the SA in the shop he purchased it from that these were very popular and well-liked. Lol.

Kind of a cliche of a fragrance because it and its two setmates, Amore and Bella, were everything you think of that defines modern mainstream shopping mall fragrances. Light, hairsprayish, chemical roses, fruits and woods. I canít call them horrid, but I donít call them pleasant. Itís another iteration of the chemical cloud that has become cheap perfumes; no, not just cheap ones, but acceptable mainstream perfumes. Itís hard to believe a person would purposely choose this to wear, except it matches what weíve come to expect of our fragrances, so itís acceptable and would fit in anywhere. That can be a powerful incentive for a person just looking for a fragrance to match others. Even the artificial tone of it is acceptable now. But at the very least, I would turn that person on to La Vie Est Belle by LancŰme, an acceptable mainstream feminine fragrance of this stripe.

I will probably give this exact same review to Capri and Bella.
27th June, 2019

Amore by Vince Camuto

I received this at Christmas as part of a three-perfume Vince Camuto gift set. The person who gifted it to me knew I like fragrances and was convinced by the SA in the shop he purchased it from that these were very popular and well-liked. Lol.

Kind of a cliche of a fragrance because it and its two setmates, Capri and Bella, were everything you think of that defines modern mainstream shopping mall fragrances. Light, hairsprayish, chemical roses, fruits and woods. I canít call them horrid, but I donít call them pleasant. Itís another iteration of the chemical cloud that has become cheap perfumes; no, not just cheap ones, but acceptable mainstream perfumes. Itís hard to believe a person would purposely choose this to wear, except it matches what weíve come to expect of our fragrances, so itís acceptable and would fit in anywhere. That can be a powerful incentive for a person just looking for a fragrance to match others. Even the artificial tone of it is acceptable now. But at the very least, I would turn that person on to La Vie Est Belle by LancŰme, an acceptable mainstream feminine fragrance of this stripe.

I will probably give this exact same review to Capri and Bella.

19th June, 2019 (last edited: 27th June, 2019)

Playing with the Devil by By Kilian

Notes:
blood orange, black currant, white peach and litchi, pimento, rose, jasmine, pepper, cedar, sandalwood, patchouli, tonka bean, benzoin and vanilla.

The first two or three hours are beautiful, with an enchanting rose, orange, litchi, peach and black current accord; more floral than non-sweet fruit, it sings a light-handed graceful song. It needs to be experienced rather than analyzed because breaking down its notes will lead you away from what is special about it.

So the fact that it has an ending that turns flat after 3-1/2 hours and non-beautiful after 4-1/2 hours, before dropping off is very disappointing. What do you do with these type of fragrances that have a smashing half-life before becoming uninteresting and disappearing? I dislike this type of perfume enough, itís a testament to its early beauty that I ordered a decant just to smell the first three hours. But in spite of my doing so, I canít give this fragrance a thumbs-up.
11th June, 2019 (last edited: 22nd June, 2019)

Jason Wu Eau de Parfum by Jason Wu

Jason Wu is nice enough to wear to functions without letting any skank, kink or gauche show. Eminently presentable and sophisticated. Though lighter, itís not ephemeral at all.

It has a light abstracted neutral floral opening. The fig keeps it neutral, from going high-pitched or too floral. I got a cool clean iris powder note directly on applying that I liked a lot, because it smells like a high-quality iris. It disappears fairly quickly though. The opening is really more a muted smooth floral with a fuzz of accent from the pink pepper, giving the perkiness of an aldehyde (there may be some aldehydes, Iím not sure, but it seems more in the character of a light pepper).

As it ages, the jasmine heart comes forward more - non-indolic, pleasant and light. The peony keeps the jasmine in check a bit, keeping it more neutral, which I like better. I usually find peony architectural and soulless, a little unmoving and inscrutable. Here I like what it does to the jasmine. Jason Wu still retains that jasmine prettiness, but takes it to a more sophisticated level. This isnít a Chanel sophistication, which wows you, but a balance and good interplay of notes with a sort of polish of smoothness.

Because it has a toned down, almost Ďbeige floralí quality, itís versatile. I wear this and donít feel dumbed down, cheapened, or worst of all, bored, because it has a subtle, well-judged sophistication, a trimness.

Itís bringing to mind two other fragrances I tried recently, ĎJasmins Marzipaneí and ĎAlaiaí. These three have been introduced in the last four years, and I detect a similar ethos in them. Whether Jason Wu can stand up to the heavy burden of being compared to those two greats, I donít know, but they each bring to mind the others for me.

The musk of the drydown is a token nod, mainly a way to bring this fragrance to completion, acceptable and appropriate. It has a quality lacking in so many great perfumes now - a satisfying ending.

The picture Jason Wu is bringing to mind is being in the office of a friend of mine. Itís spacious, pleasant, and has abstract expressionistic art on the wall. This fragrance resonates with that office. Quite a nice fragrance.
07th June, 2019 (last edited: 04th October, 2019)