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  1. #1

    Default If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Greetings,

    So right off the bat, I am not talking about cheap knock offs - which anyone can do at any time, but similar (but not exactly) to a television show that one network cancels and another network picks up to give it another chance - could a fragrance company more or less come out with the same fragrance, if they feel that the fragrance is great - but the previous company that first launched the fragrance kind of botched things in their view.

    Now obviously it probably would need to be renamed - while you can't copyright a fragrance, you can copyright the name of it. So Versace couldn't come out with Aventus and actually have it actually smell the same as Aventus were it to be discontinued. Unless perhaps they paid for the rights across the board.

    As a fragrance enthusiast, would you look down at the idea of discontinued fragrances that you loved obviously being resurrected by other houses - again, not cheap knockoff, but a close as possible bring back to life of the fragrance with the same quality under a different name. A second chance for the fragrance maybe by a house that feels they will do a better job with it.

    I am not suggesting though that this become some standard industry thing - where fragrance companies stop being original and creative and just relaunch old products - I am just talking once in a while where a fragrance maybe didn't really get a fair shot due to lack of marketing and promotion or some other factor with another house thinking that original house had a gem on their hands and screwed it up.

    I am curious what people's feedback on this would be.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Super Member Mr G's Avatar
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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    One example springs to mind immediately: Bentley Absolute and Gucci Pour Homme I. I'm sure others will have more examples.

  3. #3

    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr G View Post
    One example springs to mind immediately: Bentley Absolute and Gucci Pour Homme I. I'm sure others will have more examples.
    Not familiar with either - is it a true relaunch just by another house?

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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    The fragrance don’t need to be discontinued...
    I don’t understand.It is so vast that surpasses all understanding.Understanding is always limited.But not understanding can have no boundaries.I feel like I'm much more complete when I don't understand.Not understanding,like I say,is a gift.Not understanding,but not as a simple-minded.The good thing is to be intelligent and not understand.It's a strange blessing, like having craziness without being crazy.It is a meek disinterest,it is a stupid sweetness.
    Currently wearing: cK one by Calvin Klein

  5. #5

    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by Beck View Post
    The fragrance don’t need to be discontinued...
    Well sure, but it is not going to go over well if Dolce and Gabbana release a fragrance that already exists by another major house vs knock off companies.

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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Even if it's not discontinued, there are no laws directly protecting formula, which is why chem firms like Firmenich, IFF, Givaudan, and Symrise keep their formulas secret from the client fashion houses that commission them to produce and manufacture scent. François Demachy was tasked to bring all the then currently-made Diors back "in house" so LVMH didn't have to pay royalties or other fees to whoever produced their fragrances in the past, so he literally had to use mass spectrometers and gas chromatography to analyze then reverse-engineer every Dior fragrance.

    This is why Dior Homme, Fahrenheit, and several others Dior didn't own the formula to now have his name attached as perfumer alongside the original perfumers of anything pre-2011 not made by him initially. It wasn't 100% done for IFRA or for Demachy to add his creative stamp (although he did), it was more about making a new formula that was different but smelled same enough as what other firms had made for Dior. All this because they wouldn't sell or divulge their formulas since nothing protects them from copying besides secrecy.

    Much of the higher-end clone house business is done the same way, with GC and MS analysis, then cheapened up where possible and changed enough to be "alternative". As for nomenclature or packaging, it really depends on if you can trademark the word. Jean Patou cannot trademark the word "Joy" because it's too common a phrase, which is how Dior got away with also making a perfume called "Joy". The debacle with Sutton between Parfums de Marly and Bond No.9 is mostly haute bourgeois one percenter ego nonsense because Laurice Rahmé is basically the Miranda Priestly of the perfume world and threatened a slap suit on PdM if they didn't change it. Win or lose it would delay the release of what was meant to be a summer fragrance.

    In summary, you can create or recreate anything if you know the formula, barring modifications required by IFRA and ingredient availability/cost, and you can also use or re-use a name if it isn't copyrighted. Many perfumers revist past creations and modify them for new releases under different houses. Look at the work of Michael Almairac or Olivier Polge for what I mean. The only thing you can't recreate with a fragrance discontinued or not is the packaging, which is the one thing designers can very easily patent or trademark. This is why Anglia Perfumery recreated several of the old Crown Perfumery scents after Clive Christian bought and dismantled the brand. All he wanted was the packaging and logos for his vanity label, he didn't give two s**ts about the actual Crown perfume catalog, or else he would have kept it in production himself.
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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zealot Crusader View Post
    Even if it's not discontinued, there are no laws directly protecting formula
    True enough.
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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Someone remake Dior Eau Sauvage Parfum 2012 now! It’s Dior’s loss for losing this masterpiece!
    Currently wearing: Vetiver by Guerlain

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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zealot Crusader View Post
    Even if it's not discontinued, there are no laws directly protecting formula, which is why chem firms like Firmenich, IFF, Givaudan, and Symrise keep their formulas secret from the client fashion houses that commission them to produce and manufacture scent. François Demachy was tasked to bring all the then currently-made Diors back "in house" so LVMH didn't have to pay royalties or other fees to whoever produced their fragrances in the past, so he literally had to use mass spectrometers and gas chromatography to analyze then reverse-engineer every Dior fragrance.

    This is why Dior Homme, Fahrenheit, and several others Dior didn't own the formula to now have his name attached as perfumer alongside the original perfumers of anything pre-2011 not made by him initially. It wasn't 100% done for IFRA or for Demachy to add his creative stamp (although he did), it was more about making a new formula that was different but smelled same enough as what other firms had made for Dior. All this because they wouldn't sell or divulge their formulas since nothing protects them from copying besides secrecy.

    Much of the higher-end clone house business is done the same way, with GC and MS analysis, then cheapened up where possible and changed enough to be "alternative". As for nomenclature or packaging, it really depends on if you can trademark the word. Jean Patou cannot trademark the word "Joy" because it's too common a phrase, which is how Dior got away with also making a perfume called "Joy". The debacle with Sutton between Parfums de Marly and Bond No.9 is mostly haute bourgeois one percenter ego nonsense because Laurice Rahmé is basically the Miranda Priestly of the perfume world and threatened a slap suit on PdM if they didn't change it. Win or lose it would delay the release of what was meant to be a summer fragrance.

    In summary, you can create or recreate anything if you know the formula, barring modifications required by IFRA and ingredient availability/cost, and you can also use or re-use a name if it isn't copyrighted. Many perfumers revist past creations and modify them for new releases under different houses. Look at the work of Michael Almairac or Olivier Polge for what I mean. The only thing you can't recreate with a fragrance discontinued or not is the packaging, which is the one thing designers can very easily patent or trademark. This is why Anglia Perfumery recreated several of the old Crown Perfumery scents after Clive Christian bought and dismantled the brand. All he wanted was the packaging and logos for his vanity label, he didn't give two s**ts about the actual Crown perfume catalog, or else he would have kept it in production himself.
    Wow! Now that’s a class!
    And searching I learned that Mrs Rahmé is not a bitch, but a chienne.
    I don’t understand.It is so vast that surpasses all understanding.Understanding is always limited.But not understanding can have no boundaries.I feel like I'm much more complete when I don't understand.Not understanding,like I say,is a gift.Not understanding,but not as a simple-minded.The good thing is to be intelligent and not understand.It's a strange blessing, like having craziness without being crazy.It is a meek disinterest,it is a stupid sweetness.
    Currently wearing: cK one by Calvin Klein

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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by speckmann0706 View Post
    Someone remake Dior Eau Sauvage Parfum 2012 now! It’s Dior’s loss for losing this masterpiece!
    They could remake the whole Sauvage line either. The sample they analyzed for the gas chromatography was spoiled.
    I don’t understand.It is so vast that surpasses all understanding.Understanding is always limited.But not understanding can have no boundaries.I feel like I'm much more complete when I don't understand.Not understanding,like I say,is a gift.Not understanding,but not as a simple-minded.The good thing is to be intelligent and not understand.It's a strange blessing, like having craziness without being crazy.It is a meek disinterest,it is a stupid sweetness.
    Currently wearing: cK one by Calvin Klein

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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    ZC explained things well. I would love if some house were to resurrect masterpieces and market them with a different name. But IFRA has made this impossible. Plus, even though it can be done, it would probably be too expensive to justify the cost.

    cacio

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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    It has been achieved by Manny from Rogue Perfumery - 40 Rogue was a remake of 40 Love by jean desprez.
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  13. #13

    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Thankfully for us, there are no laws against it. Doesn't matter if it's discontinued or not.

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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zealot Crusader View Post
    Even if it's not discontinued, there are no laws directly protecting formula, which is why chem firms like Firmenich, IFF, Givaudan, and Symrise keep their formulas secret from the client fashion houses that commission them to produce and manufacture scent.
    There are laws that directly protect formulae: patent laws. However, there are two issues for perfumers. First, fragrance patents are untested in the courts; and second, for patent to apply, a formula would have to be published. Given the legal uncertainty, fragrance designers and their clients are reluctant to reveal their formulae, preferring to rely on secrecy for protection.

    As for nomenclature or packaging, it really depends on if you can trademark the word. Jean Patou cannot trademark the word "Joy" because it's too common a phrase, which is how Dior got away with also making a perfume called "Joy".
    Although there are restrictions on trademarking common words and phrases, they can still be trademarked for specific applications and in association with logos and other packaging/marketing elements. So, for example, Patou’s Joy perfume existed at the same time as Procter & Gamble’s Joy dishwashing liquid—and both were trademarked.

    Dior was able to release a perfume named Joy for a different reason: Dior parent LVMH purchased a controlling stake in Patou.

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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by PStoller View Post
    There are laws that directly protect formulae: patent laws. However, there are two issues for perfumers. First, fragrance patents are untested in the courts; and second, for patent to apply, a formula would have to be published. Given the legal uncertainty, fragrance designers and their clients are reluctant to reveal their formulae, preferring to rely on secrecy for protection.


    Although there are restrictions on trademarking common words and phrases, they can still be trademarked for specific applications and in association with logos and other packaging/marketing elements. So, for example, Patou’s Joy perfume existed at the same time as Procter & Gamble’s Joy dishwashing liquid—and both were trademarked.

    Dior was able to release a perfume named Joy for a different reason: Dior parent LVMH purchased a controlling stake in Patou.
    All of this was enjoyable information to read. If LVMH has a controlling stake in Patou, it's a better place to be than with P&G Prestige Beaute (their previous owners). Guerlain has held up really well, for example (histrionics about reformulation of antique classics aside).
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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zealot Crusader View Post
    If LVMH has a controlling stake in Patou, it's a better place to be than with P&G Prestige Beaute (their previous owners). Guerlain has held up really well, for example (histrionics about reformulation of antique classics aside).
    I hope you’re right, amigo. I confess I haven’t been paying close attention, but as of yet, I haven’t seen LVMH do anything with Patou fragrances other than lifting the Joy monicker, which seems boneheaded even if it’s legal. I think their real interest is in reviving the fashion house. But as this isn’t the time to roll out anything big, we may not know their intentions for a year or, um, more.

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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by PStoller View Post
    I hope you’re right, amigo. I confess I haven’t been paying close attention, but as of yet, I haven’t seen LVMH do anything with Patou fragrances other than lifting the Joy monicker, which seems boneheaded even if it’s legal. I think their real interest is in reviving the fashion house. But as this isn’t the time to roll out anything big, we may not know their intentions for a year or, um, more.
    Yeah, I think "fashioning" Patou back into a solid rival of Chanel (like it once was) is probably the long-term plan, but keeping what sells on the market just as it is in the short-term.
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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zealot Crusader View Post
    This is why Anglia Perfumery recreated several of the old Crown Perfumery scents after Clive Christian bought and dismantled the brand. All he wanted was the packaging and logos for his vanity label, he didn't give two s**ts about the actual Crown perfume catalog, or else he would have kept it in production himself.
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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zealot Crusader View Post
    The only thing you can't recreate with a fragrance discontinued or not is the packaging, which is the one thing designers can very easily patent or trademark. This is why Anglia Perfumery recreated several of the old Crown Perfumery scents after Clive Christian bought and dismantled the brand. All he wanted was the packaging and logos for his vanity label, he didn't give two s**ts about the actual Crown perfume catalog, or else he would have kept it in production himself.
    Clive Christian is clearly the anti-Barry Gibson. I like some of CC’s fragrances enough that I don’t hate him—heck, I wouldn’t have discovered Crown were it not for CC—but his neglect of the Crown catalog is still criminal.

    I haven’t tried any of the Anglia recreations, but most of the reviews I’ve read indicate I’m not missing much. I guess the road to “meh” is paved with good intentions.

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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Was discussing last night with friends how cannibalistic culture has become in the last decade in particular - how the internet has played its part in 'opening up' the past while at the same time the present has narrowed and become stilted and indistinct.

    I'd say this would apply to fragrances, too. How many people have plundered the archives and the catalogues for the sake of...novelty? Or uniqueness. Or simply scratching the ever-growing itch which is 'feeling good' via the search, and pull of the scarcity mindset that occurs when something is discontinued or, in one way or another, exclusive.

    There's nothing really to add to Zealot's post. It says it all. Cloning is much harder to achieve than we think - the fact there still isn't even a half-decent Aventus clone despite the numerous attempts is telling of this fact. Ingredient 'quality' and, as if not more importantly, the 'house style' or so called DNA are fundamental to how a fragrance smells - just look at the two GPH1 recreations, by Bentley and Parle Moi de Parfum, for this in action.

    I understand if people are emotionally invested in a fragrance how frustrating it is to see it killed off, butchered, or for it to skyrocket in price.

    However I also think there's something to be said for modernity and future thinking - would rampant 're-issuing' be a good thing? To my mind, no, it wouldn't - in fact we sort of already have this exact situation. The lack of risk and creativity among the big players in particular is indicative of something worrying about the economics of fragrance - I don't think adding more nostalgia to the mix would be a good thing. For nearly every fragrance, there's the second hand market - if it's that much of a love.
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    Currently wearing: Aventus by Creed

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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by PStoller View Post
    Clive Christian is clearly the anti-Barry Gibson. I like some of CC’s fragrances enough that I don’t hate him—heck, I wouldn’t have discovered Crown were it not for CC—but his neglect of the Crown catalog is still criminal.

    I haven’t tried any of the Anglia recreations, but most of the reviews I’ve read indicate I’m not missing much. I guess the road to “meh” is paved with good intentions.
    I'm a huge fan of 1872 for men, but even half-price for a 100ml is upwards of $400, so despite my kindness in the review for it, will probably never own it, or have a heart attack convincing myself to use it if I did, each spray literally dollars in the wind haha.
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  22. #22

    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by slpfrsly View Post
    Was discussing last night with friends how cannibalistic culture has become in the last decade in particular - how the internet has played its part in 'opening up' the past while at the same time the present has narrowed and become stilted and indistinct.

    I'd say this would apply to fragrances, too. How many people have plundered the archives and the catalogues for the sake of...novelty? Or uniqueness. Or simply scratching the ever-growing itch which is 'feeling good' via the search, and pull of the scarcity mindset that occurs when something is discontinued or, in one way or another, exclusive.

    There's nothing really to add to Zealot's post. It says it all. Cloning is much harder to achieve than we think - the fact there still isn't even a half-decent Aventus clone despite the numerous attempts is telling of this fact. Ingredient 'quality' and, as if not more importantly, the 'house style' or so called DNA are fundamental to how a fragrance smells - just look at the two GPH1 recreations, by Bentley and Parle Moi de Parfum, for this in action.

    I understand if people are emotionally invested in a fragrance how frustrating it is to see it killed off, butchered, or for it to skyrocket in price.

    However I also think there's something to be said for modernity and future thinking - would rampant 're-issuing' be a good thing? To my mind, no, it wouldn't - in fact we sort of already have this exact situation. The lack of risk and creativity among the big players in particular is indicative of something worrying about the economics of fragrance - I don't think adding more nostalgia to the mix would be a good thing. For nearly every fragrance, there's the second hand market - if it's that much of a love.
    But has someone truly spent the money to try to duplicate Aventus? I think maybe that is the point - a knock off company is only going to go so far when trying to duplicate. I assume and maybe I am wrong here, but if Tom Ford wanted to duplicate Aventus, he probably has the money and resources to do so.

  23. #23

    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hey Man View Post
    I am not suggesting though that this become some standard industry thing - where fragrance companies stop being original and creative and just relaunch old products
    But this has become the case. Designers and even independent houses are bolder than ever in copying accords as a de-risking measure. Mediocrity sells, especially when something innovative already took the risk and proved to be a success story.
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  24. #24

    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by jabar View Post
    But this has become the case. Designers and even independent houses are bolder than ever in copying accords as a de-risking measure. Mediocrity sells, especially when something innovative already took the risk and proved to be a success story.
    Perhaps I didn't realize how common copying is among major houses vs. knock off type companies. Having said that, nothing is truly original anymore. It has all been done - from food to music to movies, so maybe it makes sense with fragrance as well.

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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by blackaroma View Post
    Thankfully for us, there are no laws against it. Doesn't matter if it's discontinued or not.
    Yep, this.

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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hey Man View Post
    But has someone truly spent the money to try to duplicate Aventus? I think maybe that is the point - a knock off company is only going to go so far when trying to duplicate. I assume and maybe I am wrong here, but if Tom Ford wanted to duplicate Aventus, he probably has the money and resources to do so.
    Tom Ford's a really poor example to use. Aside from the fact they're now merely one arm within a much larger business, they're all about ripping off older fragrances and repositioning their updated versions of existing fragrances as 'elite' versions when, often, there's a mixed bag of successes and expensive failures (in my opinion). To copy Aventus woiuld be a death knell for their brand - because it would be derivative of one of their main competitors in the section of the market. Their 'brand' is a romanticised version of the 1970s in particular, but more generally a sepia toned and velvet textured version of the past - which is why it's weird when they bring out scents like Oud Minerale, an anomaly in amongst the Tom Ford for Mens, Beau de Jours, Grey Vetivers, Noir Pour Femmes etc...

    However, there have been absolutely loads of expensive clones that, at least in part, are Aventus-inspired. From Royal Vintage to Laboratory Amber to Morning Chess. The difference? They don't WANT to be clones - they take the basic idea and tweak it. As Zealot says, there's professional acclaim on the line and making an Aventus-esque fragrance might be a big seller, but professionally for the perfumers involved, they also want to make something markedly their own. Obviously.

    My point about clones is very simple - Creed no doubt has access to the aforementioned protected ingredients that make their fragrances what they are. That, and the fact that clone houses are mostly looking for quick profit, and that comes from selling bottles a lot more bottles for £20 rather than fewer bottles for £80. It serves them to be cheap. Armaf aren't in it for the 'art', let's be honest...

    I'd also reiterate my point which is cloning is harder to 'do' than we imagine.
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  27. #27

    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    (almost) anything is possible in the fragrance world, as well as nearly any line of work/business.
    And if a discontinued fragrance is profitable enough (at least to anyone else than the fragrance house that discontinued its fragrance and even in this case, backhanded price gouging Ebay & co. style is not excluded) and if there is at least one legal loophole but also the capital, human resources, marketing etc. to re-release or non-discontinue the fragrance, chances are that almost no discontinuation is permanent.

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    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrewthecologneguy View Post
    Holly “crown”! What don’t people do, huh?
    I don’t understand.It is so vast that surpasses all understanding.Understanding is always limited.But not understanding can have no boundaries.I feel like I'm much more complete when I don't understand.Not understanding,like I say,is a gift.Not understanding,but not as a simple-minded.The good thing is to be intelligent and not understand.It's a strange blessing, like having craziness without being crazy.It is a meek disinterest,it is a stupid sweetness.
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  29. #29

    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by slpfrsly View Post
    Tom Ford's a really poor example to use. Aside from the fact they're now merely one arm within a much larger business, they're all about ripping off older fragrances and repositioning their updated versions of existing fragrances as 'elite' versions when, often, there's a mixed bag of successes and expensive failures (in my opinion). To copy Aventus woiuld be a death knell for their brand - because it would be derivative of one of their main competitors in the section of the market. Their 'brand' is a romanticised version of the 1970s in particular, but more generally a sepia toned and velvet textured version of the past - which is why it's weird when they bring out scents like Oud Minerale, an anomaly in amongst the Tom Ford for Mens, Beau de Jours, Grey Vetivers, Noir Pour Femmes etc...

    However, there have been absolutely loads of expensive clones that, at least in part, are Aventus-inspired. From Royal Vintage to Laboratory Amber to Morning Chess. The difference? They don't WANT to be clones - they take the basic idea and tweak it. As Zealot says, there's professional acclaim on the line and making an Aventus-esque fragrance might be a big seller, but professionally for the perfumers involved, they also want to make something markedly their own. Obviously.

    My point about clones is very simple - Creed no doubt has access to the aforementioned protected ingredients that make their fragrances what they are. That, and the fact that clone houses are mostly looking for quick profit, and that comes from selling bottles a lot more bottles for £20 rather than fewer bottles for £80. It serves them to be cheap. Armaf aren't in it for the 'art', let's be honest...

    I'd also reiterate my point which is cloning is harder to 'do' than we imagine.
    Fair enough on Tom Ford, but the point was a brand who has money and resources to do what a knock off company cannot. Replace Tom Ford with Armani, D&G, Gucci, Hugo Boss, Calvin Klein, Versace, etc. I am sure if they were willing to go all in on duplicating Aventus - they could.

  30. #30

    Default Re: If A Fragrance Is Discontinued, Can Another Company Come Out With The Same Thing More Or Less?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken_Russell View Post
    (almost) anything is possible in the fragrance world, as well as nearly any line of work/business.
    And if a discontinued fragrance is profitable enough (at least to anyone else than the fragrance house that discontinued its fragrance and even in this case, backhanded price gouging Ebay & co. style is not excluded) and if there is at least one legal loophole but also the capital, human resources, marketing etc. to re-release or non-discontinue the fragrance, chances are that almost no discontinuation is permanent.
    Isn't this forum full of discussion of countless discontinued fragrances that people wish were still available?




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