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  1. #31

    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy the frenchy View Post
    This.
    Sometimes a regrettable thing, but many times it’s not, imo. As for the materials, honestly, I m happy with the amount of bitter moss there is now in fragrances, because when there’s too much, honestly, it makes me nauseatous. In a nutshell: I feel that some oldies have been positively impacted by reformulations lol
    What is amusing to me in regards to oakmoss is the frantic irrationality of the subject. What I've gathered listening and reading the thoughts of perfumers is the amount of atranol free oakmoss that is allowed in perfume today, and is still IFRA complaint, is more than plenty. That if you add the max amount you can for most composition purposes you end up with way too much oakmoss. What happened was in the mid 2000's when oakmoss was limited due to the regulation, and low/free of atranol oakmoss was expensive to produce, plus perfumes had to be reformulated to account for it, you got a few years where perfumes who's original formula contained lots of oakmoss were just not that great. As technicians discovered ways to produce atranol free oakmoss for a reasonable price, tweaked and reformulated formulas to account for the new oakmoss, or just plain found a different way to achieve the desired effect (all which took years), these before mentioned fragrances had life brought back to them. Mitsouko is still kicking and beautiful, Antaeus made due without oakmoss, and the perfumes that still want to use it can. It took some years to get to an acceptable point, but we're here again.

  2. #32
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by GoldWineMemories View Post
    What is amusing to me in regards to oakmoss is the frantic irrationality of the subject. What I've gathered listening and reading the thoughts of perfumers is the amount of atranol free oakmoss that is allowed in perfume today, and is still IFRA complaint, is more than plenty. That if you add the max amount you can for most composition purposes you end up with way too much oakmoss. What happened was in the mid 2000's when oakmoss was limited due to the regulation, and low/free of atranol oakmoss was expensive to produce, plus perfumes had to be reformulated to account for it, you got a few years where perfumes who's original formula contained lots of oakmoss were just not that great. As technicians discovered ways to produce atranol free oakmoss for a reasonable price, tweaked and reformulated formulas to account for the new oakmoss, or just plain found a different way to achieve the desired effect (all which took years), these before mentioned fragrances had life brought back to them. Mitsouko is still kicking and beautiful, Antaeus made due without oakmoss, and the perfumes that still want to use it can. It took some years to get to an acceptable point, but we're here again.
    I didnt know about the atranol-free oakmoss story, but yes, it makes sense.
    Currently wearing: Resina by Oliver & Co.

  3. #33
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    I think there is a stiff dose of rose-tinted glasses nostalgia and "change my mind" combativeness in the way OP phrased the question, which with all due respect, make it rather seem like a rhetorical question.

    I don't really know if any answer I give will help edify the poster, especially given the attempts above, so I'll just go with the flow and say "perfume is dead, long live perfume", and douse myself in Kouros. *shrug*
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  4. #34

    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    I don't really know where the line is on how well our "scent memory" really works. More specifically, I think many of our experiences when we younger are much more vivid and become a bit romanticized. I wore POLO and GREY FLANNEL when they first came out and they seemed way more awesome than I perceive them now.

    As I kid, I recall McDonalds hamburgers as being delicious, excellent, greatest thing ever! But were they ever really that good?

    I don't doubt that there have been some changes through the years and that many frags now are "weaker" overall. But I think it's easy to look back fondly and believe the good ole days were way better than they really were.

    I'm quite content with the current state of perfumery.
    Between Covid and retirement I don't get out much. But when I do, I smell real good.
    Currently wearing: Antaeus by Chanel

  5. #35
    Basenotes Institution Danny Mitchell's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    We only remember the best fragrances. The awful ones get forgotten. It's the same now. In 30 years, we'll only remember the great releases. All the failures and pointless flankers will be forgotten.
    "Ducks eat for free at Subway."
    Currently wearing: Polo by Ralph Lauren

  6. #36

    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy the frenchy View Post
    But for sure such innovation, it’s not at Sephora or Creed that it will be found. (Most of the Creed I ve tried are refined, but indeed thin).
    But Creed is a big innovator! They managed to bring refinement and artististry into a category that has often been dismissed as "glorified aftershaves" (or something along that line of thought). With Aventus they also brought much needed performance alongside refinement, freshness and pleasantness.

  7. #37

    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Refinement and artistry have a tenuous connection to public opinion, popular or otherwise. I've been into perfumes for less than a year, so my understanding of the history is still pretty flimsy, but dismissal of vintage perfumery as "glorified aftershaves" is incomprehensible to me (and it's a claim I've seen directed [also erroneously] toward the perfume market today). Creed has some good fragrances, but their innovative genius seems to lie less in the juice than in the copy that sells it.

  8. #38
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Rogue Perfumery would be worth looking at.
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  9. #39
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by ccdan View Post
    The fragrances of today are far richer and better quality than those from the 80s!

    Almost any Roja, Creed, Xerjoff, Amouage or Tom Ford PB.
    I think there's pros and cons to both. It's subjective to the individual.
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  10. #40

    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Check out Francesca Bianchi's line.

  11. #41

    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by bolocko View Post
    Refinement and artistry have a tenuous connection to public opinion, popular or otherwise.
    True beauty and genuine quality most often get near universal praise.
    Pretentious garbage that tries to pass as artistry, indeed, has a tenuous connection to public opinion

    Quote Originally Posted by bolocko View Post
    but their innovative genius seems to lie less in the juice.
    Their innovative genius lies precisely in the juice. Otherwise they wouldn't be able to sell that juice at the prices they sell, especially given that their marketing is zero.

    In order to enjoy and appreciate Creed creations, one needs the following: 1. normal nose 2. to like freshies in general 3. to have a tiny bit of experience with what's out there in terms of freshies 4. to be honest(not swayed by non-actual-frag issues like "it's too popular", "it's worn/bought by jerks/oligarchs/myenemies", "creed fake history", etc.)

    4 is a huge issue for many people

  12. #42
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by ccdan View Post
    1.True beauty and genuine quality most often get near universal praise.
    Pretentious garbage that tries to pass as artistry, indeed, has a tenuous connection to public opinion

    2. (...) is a huge issue for many people
    1. According to that reasoning, Sauvage and Dior Homme 2020 are beauties, since these sell very well and I cannot imagine someone spending money for something one doesn’t intimately believe is beautiful.

    2. The only issue I have with Creed is price. As you said mostly freshies, that smell thin to my nose, and for which I wouldn’t spend more than $100 a bottle, given how much similar or more satisfactory stuff to my nose other houses offer.
    I tried Erolfa in store, loved it, bought a second hand bottle for $100 (from a repurable basenoter), only to discover that my olfactive memory is playing tricks on me, and that’s not wort more than $50.
    I have Viking on my wishlist, found a deal at $150, and still I did not buy it because it’s not worth more than $100 in my book, compared to many stuff I’ve smelt elsewhere.
    I also have Royal Oud on my wishlist, but I m not going to pay 20X for a Lomani fragrance rebottled.

    People dont have a problem with people buying Creed, just that its success had its price rise. Not because of quality, but because of frat bro-hype.
    Many people buy Aventus blind, just because it’s the new Sauvage in terms of bro-fashion, and bros like to play in the same “team”, to have the same “codes”. That’s what happened to Ralph Lauren, Lacoste and Adidas in France: these are now (nearly) exclusively gangsta brands, worn by under 30 in the hot suburbs. I wouldn’t be surprised if Creed is the next in line (if not already).

    Of course Creed advertises: influencers, social medias, platforms. (Classic magazine and TV ads are dead since a long time ago).
    But they do it so well, that the targets dont even realize that. You would fool yourself in thinking that the “hype” is only born based on quality and word of mouth... If it was true, based on quality and "wow effect", you would be spending those big bucks on ultra indie brands, hardly talked about - not Creed.
    Creed have good stuff, but not $300 good.
    Currently wearing: Resina by Oliver & Co.

  13. #43
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by N.CAL Fragrance Reviewer View Post
    Rogue Perfumery would be worth looking at.
    This is what I was thinking of. Roja aims for this style but I find it's a modernised version and very much smells of the 'now' in the base. Rogue doesn't, at least not completely.
    “If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.”
    Currently wearing: Aventus by Creed

  14. #44
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by GoldWineMemories View Post
    It is possible to argue that, and it may be even be true. However, I think enthusiasts and obsessives here, of which anyone who cares enough to talk about this in depth about is, must acknowledge implicit biases against modern perfumes. Of the exact of these bias I'd rather not get into, that's for you to find out and accept on your own (I make this as a general statement not directed at you specifically). I think it's a very fair statement to say perfumes of the modern time are different than that of before. I think it is a valid opinion to hold that older perfumes are more pleasing in style, and you or I find them more beautiful than the perfumes of today. I don't think it's a just statement to say perfumes of the modern age are thin, sickly, or not-rich. If you look for that you can find it, and if you look for those that are rich, thick, decadent, full, and beautiful you can also find these in spades.
    There is absolutely a bias against modern fragrances, I agree, and it's frustrating to come across. It's subjectivity tainted with nostalgia and comes out smelling like snobbery. There are many facets of vintage fragrances which...take any 20 year old today, isolate them from the culture and memories people have of older fragrances, and get them to judge it...I'm not saying that is a perfect test, but nor is the testimony of older wearers inclined to look back romantically on vintage fragrances.

    I'm not sure that's happening in this thread, however. I think there has been an identification of a difference between 'old' and 'new', broadly speaking, and while you can definitely get POWER and STRENGTH from new releases, a lot of it seems to be of a different kind. It's intentional when it comes to orientals and niche fragrances; equating power to opulence and price when the issue being raised is how commonplace 'strength' and richness was in even your run of the mill, affordable fragrances in the past.

    I think the most obvious counter to this is the strength of 'blue' fragrances. Invictus, Sauvage, AdG flankers...the list goes on. The 'type' of fragrance where strength is commonplace has changed; this may be where the issue of 'richness' crops up, as I sense that most people don't equate rich to aquatic, fresh, synthetic citrusy, metallic, gummy, sporty type scents. Wheras richness is easier to spot in powerhouse fragrances; herbs, woods, mosses etc.

    Trying to identify richness of the same kind seems forlorn - a lot of niche tries to ape that richness through top note loudness that falls apart in the base. On the other hand, 'true' vintage fragrances have been castrated over the years. So I can understand the complaint.

    I would disagree that the same richness can be found 'in spades' in the present day. The market has definitely changed. While you can get strength, power, and even oriental opulence today, it's not 'the same', in several ways. You can find richness in all manner of oud fragrances, for instance, but eventhough they seem to have estalished in the West as a replacement for things like powerhouse fragrances, they're not really a like for like replacement.
    “If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.”
    Currently wearing: Aventus by Creed

  15. #45
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by StylinLA View Post

    As I kid, I recall McDonalds hamburgers as being delicious, excellent, greatest thing ever! But were they ever really that good?
    Likely, yes. At least they were likely to be much 'better' than they are now - at least in some ways. Globalisation has had a knock on effect of pumping more 'chemicals' and its knock on effects (from antibiotic-resistance in pigs, to gene-altering Teflon) and, I suppose, 'synthetic' materials in to everything produced and consumed, while at the same time testing these materials for harmful effects is much more stringent (although still flawed). That said, I would assume that a burger in America in the 70s or even 80s was 'better' for you - in taste and, overall, in health - than one made today from McDonalds.

    It can't explain the scope of the excitement between 'best thing ever' and how you perceive them now. But that's the consequence of tolerance - psychological as well as neurological. What was once a wonderful, novel, and stunning thing - due to additives among the 'natural' elements of a hamnburger - became a formative experience and thus retained some 'magic' that is hard to reproduce or repeat as you get older. This is the 'genius' of something like fast food, getting its hooks in to kids with Happy Meals etc. You could point at social media as doing the same in a more...cerebral, or at least 'mindlessly mindful', way.

    We're in to the realm of objecivity, there, and that's a foolish endeavour for something as trivial and fragrance...in my opinion.
    “If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.”
    Currently wearing: Aventus by Creed

  16. #46
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by Danny Mitchell View Post
    We only remember the best fragrances. The awful ones get forgotten. It's the same now. In 30 years, we'll only remember the great releases. All the failures and pointless flankers will be forgotten.
    The internet never forgets. We won't forget the shit, I'm sure of that. We still have a very common trope when it comes to mocking powerhouse fragrances and 'vintages', for want of a better term.





    Fragrance seems to be a much smaller 'thing' today that it was a few decades ago. Far fewer people wear it, and if they do, it's significantly less 'loud'. I really do think that a lot of the purpose of fragrance was to perfume a world as much dominated by the duel forces of industrialism and cigarettes; at least, irrespective of where you lived, the latter was a factor and as we moved towards banning smoking and stopping it altogether, the 'need' for perfume evaporated. So now it's become much less of a daily necessity and moved towards what I suppose the youtubers appeal to: for men, it's an accessory for seduction. That might change if and as the Western world becomes more Islamic and, more importantly, more influenced by middle eastern cultural mores, but I wouldn't be certain of that.

    I still think we'll look back on loud, sporty scents as 'bad' in the same way. We're still sort of in that trend from the 90s, aren't we. There's a definite lineage from the aquatics through to the dark blues of today. I don't smell sweet scents on men - the Armanis and Pacos - often enough to know if it's a common issue for people to dislike them. I'd suggest not, and that they're not oversprayed to the same extent as nominally 'fresh' masculine fragrances.

    Sauvage will go down as a 'meme' though, for sure.
    “If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.”
    Currently wearing: Aventus by Creed

  17. #47

    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by slpfrsly View Post
    The internet never forgets. We won't forget the shit, I'm sure of that. We still have a very common trope when it comes to mocking powerhouse fragrances and 'vintages', for want of a better term.

    Fragrance seems to be a much bigger deal today that it was a few decades ago. Far fewer people wear it, and if they do, it's significantly less 'loud'. I really do think that a lot of the purpose of fragrance was to perfume a world as much dominated by the duel forces of industrialism and cigarettes; at least, irrespective of where you lived, the latter was a factor and as we moved towards banning smoking and stopping it altogether, the 'need' for perfume evaporated. So now it's become much less of a daily necessity and moved towards what I suppose the youtubers appeal to: for men, it's an accessory for seduction. That might change if and as the Western world becomes more Islamic and, more importantly, more influenced by middle eastern cultural mores, but I wouldn't be certain of that.

    I still think we'll look back on loud, sporty scents as 'bad' in the same way. We're still sort of in that trend from the 90s, aren't we. There's a definite lineage from the aquatics through to the dark blues of today. I don't smell sweet scents on men - the Armanis and Pacos - often enough to know if it's a common issue for people to dislike them. I'd suggest not, and that they're not oversprayed to the same extent as nominally 'fresh' masculine fragrances.

    Sauvage will go down as a 'meme' though, for sure.

    I don't think it's right to look at perfume purely from a utilitarian aspect and claim that since not as many people smoke the use for perfume has lessened. Fragrance is one of the industries that not only always has grown (not a great metric since nearly everything that doesn't die has "grown" so far), but also grows even when times are bad. Joy was released right after the Great Depression, Tom Ford's line became huge right during the 2008 recession, I'm sure there are other examples. Point being that while I also don't think perfume has elevated itself to the level of fine art, hopefully yet, it's also more than just a utility. People are buying fragrance, else the industry wouldn't grow as it has, and someone is then also wearing those purchased fragrances.

  18. #48
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by StylinLA View Post
    As I kid, I recall McDonalds hamburgers as being delicious, excellent, greatest thing ever! But were they ever really that good?

    I'm quite content with the current state of perfumery.

    Of course not. Memories from childhood: a classic of psychology. Memory is selective and "cleans up" the bad memories. If something, McDonalds might be slightly better (in taste, quality I doubt it) now, given the need - even for fast-food restaurants - to offer more appealing products.

    Me too, I think we're living a great time in perfume history. Possibly a second golden age.
    Currently wearing: Resina by Oliver & Co.

  19. #49
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by GoldWineMemories View Post
    I don't think it's right to look at perfume purely from a utilitarian aspect and claim that since not as many people smoke the use for perfume has lessened. Fragrance is one of the industries that not only always has grown (not a great metric since nearly everything that doesn't die has "grown" so far), but also grows even when times are bad. Joy was released right after the Great Depression, Tom Ford's line became huge right during the 2008 recession, I'm sure there are other examples. Point being that while I also don't think perfume has elevated itself to the level of fine art, hopefully yet, it's also more than just a utility. People are buying fragrance, else the industry wouldn't grow as it has, and someone is then also wearing those purchased fragrances.
    The market has clearly expanded, but fragrance use - and more importantly, 'loud' fragrance use - has definitely declined. I remember fragrance being much of a thing in my childhood than it is now - women smelled a certain way, men smelled a certain way, and you could smell them.

    For me - and I haven't seen anyone else make this claim so I understand it might not be obviously accepted - the world of the 90s was very different to the world of the mid 2000s. We haven't really come all that far since the mid noughties, only a lot of 'life' has retreated to a virtual realm. The smoking ban came in in the UK in the early 2000s I believe but long before that people were fully aware of the carinogenic consequences of smoking and so you weren't engulfed in smoke everywhere you went (work, cafes, peoples' homes, cars etc) in the same way as previous decades.

    Perfume's recent explosion can be explained quite easily by ecoomies of scale and the profitability of producing the product itself as well as the rise of the Middle East economically. Hence why most of the niche market is oriental in nature.

    The people who are buying fragrances are people who couldn't buy them in the 90s. Namely, the huge percentage of the global population that has been lifted out of poverty since 2000.

    In talking about the western world, perfume use has definitely decreased - at least in a stylistic and 'volume' sense. That's what I mean as much as anything else. People simply don't smell perfumed anymore. Frankly, a lot of people dress like they're wearing their pyjamas, and that was before lockdown - we've lost nearly all our sense of style and formality since the 60s. I'd also say that the internet age has cultivated visuality - hence visible tattoos becoming a 'thing' as a way of 'flexing' for neurochemical validation. Fragrance is an oddity in this sense, it cannot truly be experienced virtually as opposed to all other manners of 'life' - art, film, music, even porn/sex, communication, games/playing, sport. The closest we have are websites like this and youtubers.

    Perfume as a 'thing' has certainly declined in importance, even if the market is now massive compared to even 15 years ago. That in itself is an explanation for why richness and depth is relatively absent in modern fragraces; it's partly by design when you consider brands like Jo Malone, who seem to cater also to an East Asian market that is much less welcoming of personal fragrance than the west, let alone the middle east.
    “If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.”
    Currently wearing: Aventus by Creed

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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by GoldWineMemories View Post
    I don't think it's right to look at perfume purely from a utilitarian aspect and claim that since not as many people smoke the use for perfume has lessened. Fragrance is one of the industries that not only always has grown (not a great metric since nearly everything that doesn't die has "grown" so far), but also grows even when times are bad.
    100% true. Perfumery (and more widely cosmetics) is experiencing a strong exponential growth as it has now, as confirmed by a quick and easy Google search:

    https://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/perfume-market#:~:text=The%20global%20perfume%20market%20s ize%20was%20estimated%20at%20USD%2032.50,USD%2033. 69%20billion%20in%202020.&text=The%20global%20perf ume%20market%20is,USD%2040.91%20billion%20by%20202 5.



    Also, here a nice article on the breakdown of perfume buyers, with a focus on the "fragrance community" (that, unsurprinsingly, represents just a drop in the ocean of the fragrance market):

    http://takeonethingoff.com/blog/2018/05/23/the-business-of-perfume-demographics-gender-and-influence/
    Currently wearing: Resina by Oliver & Co.

  21. #51
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Simple answer to that: the world is much wealthier, hence the market is much larger.

    Doesn't negate my point about fragrance being less common and less loud now in the west than it was in the 80s, when smoking was widespread and common.
    “If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.”
    Currently wearing: Aventus by Creed

  22. #52

    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    I understand what's being referred to with men's colognes from years past. When I try various vintage, or even just recent-ish earlier versions of those still being made, colognes I've often noticed that there is a certain fullness, richness... a rounded quality to them. Whereas more recently introduced colognes (or recent re-formulations) in comparison have a kind of thinness to them, sort of hollow and sparse. That's not always the case and certainly there are some fine colognes that fit that fullness description that came out after the 1980's time-frame, of course, but it happens a good bit when comparing.

    ccdan - "In order to enjoy and appreciate Creed creations, one needs the following:... 4. to be honest(not swayed by non-actual-frag issues like "... it's worn/bought by jerks/oligarchs/myenemies"..."

    Hahaha, there is truth in this... =)

  23. #53
    Basenotes Institution Danny Mitchell's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by slpfrsly View Post
    The internet never forgets. We won't forget the shit, I'm sure of that. We still have a very common trope when it comes to mocking powerhouse fragrances and 'vintages', for want of a better term.





    Fragrance seems to be a much smaller 'thing' today that it was a few decades ago. Far fewer people wear it, and if they do, it's significantly less 'loud'. I really do think that a lot of the purpose of fragrance was to perfume a world as much dominated by the duel forces of industrialism and cigarettes; at least, irrespective of where you lived, the latter was a factor and as we moved towards banning smoking and stopping it altogether, the 'need' for perfume evaporated. So now it's become much less of a daily necessity and moved towards what I suppose the youtubers appeal to: for men, it's an accessory for seduction. That might change if and as the Western world becomes more Islamic and, more importantly, more influenced by middle eastern cultural mores, but I wouldn't be certain of that.

    I still think we'll look back on loud, sporty scents as 'bad' in the same way. We're still sort of in that trend from the 90s, aren't we. There's a definite lineage from the aquatics through to the dark blues of today. I don't smell sweet scents on men - the Armanis and Pacos - often enough to know if it's a common issue for people to dislike them. I'd suggest not, and that they're not oversprayed to the same extent as nominally 'fresh' masculine fragrances.

    Sauvage will go down as a 'meme' though, for sure.
    But that's the popular stuff being ragged on. I'm not talking about those.
    "Ducks eat for free at Subway."
    Currently wearing: Polo by Ralph Lauren

  24. #54
    Dependent slpfrsly's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by Danny Mitchell View Post
    But that's the popular stuff being ragged on. I'm not talking about those.
    Right - but popular doesn't mean good, surely? You said we only remember 'the best'; I'd say that's not quite true, we very much remember at least the 'smell' of the worst, hence animalic fragrances, Drakkar Noir being mocked. Depp and Sauvage will be that one day as it's the most popular fragrance of our time. Maybe of the last 20 years?
    “If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.”
    Currently wearing: Aventus by Creed

  25. #55

    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Personally I have never ventured into vintage as in getting old bottles of fragrances. However isn't one of the reasons some people go for vintage is because the vintage is simply better. Or else why would someone buy let's say a 30 year old bottle of cologne.

  26. #56
    Basenotes Institution Danny Mitchell's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by slpfrsly View Post
    Right - but popular doesn't mean good, surely? You said we only remember 'the best'; I'd say that's not quite true, we very much remember at least the 'smell' of the worst, hence animalic fragrances, Drakkar Noir being mocked. Depp and Sauvage will be that one day as it's the most popular fragrance of our time. Maybe of the last 20 years?
    Because it's not a dud. It's successful. There's so much stuff that is junk. Today just as 30 or 40 years ago. That stuff won't be remembered. We only remember the good stuff or at least the most popular.
    "Ducks eat for free at Subway."
    Currently wearing: Polo by Ralph Lauren

  27. #57

    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Rich scents? Yes. Like they used to? Not so much and I don’t think it’s likely going forward.

    There are some limiting factors.

    The big old houses like Chanel and Guerlain have over a century of knowhow under their belts which they continually build upon but they are restricted by IFRA. Independents can disregard IFRA entirely and do as they wish but they don’t have a century of formula refinement, yet. That is not to say that either can’t produce rich scents. They can. They just won’t be the way they used to be, unless of course some of the greatest living perfumers that have worked for the old houses come out of retirement and disregard IFRA to create full fat. But again some of the materials are illegal because of toxicity and some are no longer available due to depletion.

    So rich? Yes, but not like they used to be. Either the old perfumers break bad and pass on the knowledge to the current unrestricted practitioners or the independents keep doing what they are doing for longer, much longer. Either way we won’t be seeing these in the mainstream, at least not the way we once did.
    All time favourites

    Bois du Portugal
    by Creed
    Aventus by Creed
    Heritage EdT by Guerlain
    Incident Diplomatique by Jovoy
    Cool Water (vintage) by Davidoff
    Eau Sauvage (vintage) by Christian Dior
    Chic For Men (original formulation) by Carolina Herrera
    Halfeti by Penhaligon’s
    French Lover by Frederic Malle
    Jubilation Man by Amouage
    Pour Monsieur by Chanel
    Currently wearing: Fendi Uomo by Fendi

  28. #58

    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mayberry2 View Post
    Personally I have never ventured into vintage as in getting old bottles of fragrances. However isn't one of the reasons some people go for vintage is because the vintage is simply better. Or else why would someone buy let's say a 30 year old bottle of cologne.
    I do it not because vintage is better, but because many of them are different and still good and they remain interesting. It's harder to get a sense of the character of old fragrances if you're not nosing them directly, and this may appeal to some who pay particular attention to the history of the art. Those that have remained in production may have changed in interesting ways, for better or worse. There's nostalgic (and non-nostalgic!) interest for those who grew up smelling some of this perfume history, but anyone can appreciate and adore some of these old perfumes on their own terms.

    No doubt, some people can make the claim that vintage is simply better, but this is just a personal value statement. In the end, vintage batches are just additional bottles on the great shelf of the perfume market, and the people who buy ten batches of Aventus are doing the same thing as those who take slices from the decades of Shalimar production are doing the same as someone who owns fifty vetiver frags are doing the same as someone who has ten precisely-curated bottles and nothing else. That is, I like how this smells.

  29. #59

    Default Re: Do they still make any rich scented fragrances like how fragrances used to be made?

    Quote Originally Posted by amw9490 View Post
    Check out Francesca Bianchi's line.
    This!
    I seriously thinking about ordering her new one, Tyger Tyger, when it's released. Blind!
    "I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical...It is a medicine necessary for the sound health of government." - Thomas Jefferson




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Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000