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  1. #1
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    Default Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    I was thinking about the ubiquity of knock-offs like Rasasi's La Yuqawam which copy Tom Ford's Tuscan Leather. Why pay $200+ when you can fake it for $50 and smell like your wearing $200 fragrance? I'd argue that knock-offs are a dishonest practice. Lots of time and money go into creating the fragrance and marketing it, and even then, it's a gamble if it'll be a hit. The entire process employs lots and lots of people and keeps various industries in business. The knock-off companies don't do any of that. They just piggy back off the hard work of all those involved by copying the scent and then advertising it as "Our Version of Tom Ford's Tuscan Leather." Why keep your local Nordstrom or Sephora in business when you can just sample TL there, and then order La Yuaqam off Amazon?

    And then I got to thinking about people that actually do buy designer and niche fragrances. I know people successful people who can afford Tom Ford and Creed fragrances, but I also know people who are working class at best and still manage to wear Dior and Tom Ford. It's their money and they can do what they want with it, but plunking down $100+ for a fragrance but not having any savings or health insurance seems a little financially irresponsible.

    And thinking about it more, I remember being in middle school and all the guys wearing Eternity for Men, Davidoff Cool Water, and Drakkar Noir. These were pricey fragrances back then, and most of us wearing these fragrances were from working class families. Why did 13 year olds need to be wearing designer brand fragrances?

    I'd think that there'd be a stronger demand for original, budget-friendly fragrances. But no one wants that, regardless of their financial means or status in life. No one wants to smell "cheap." Everyone wants to dress and smell like they're a rich celebrity, and they'll find a way even if they're broke and unemployed.

    I was reading about old school Avon fragrances and how they appealed to the working class and were marketed that way. I think that's pretty cool. But at some point in time Avon was looked down upon as "cheap" and virtually everyone had to be wearing designer brand fragrances. Because no one wants to appear "budget friendly", right? God forbid. But now, even wearing designer stuff like Dior or Chanel can be considered "basic," so saving up to buy $400 Creed Aventus becomes the new standard. Which in turn fuels a demand for knock-offs like "Pineapple Vintage."

    Why not support brands that create original fragrances that won't put you in the poor house?

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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Indeed, it is possible to make good perfumes for relatively low prices. Unfortunately, there isn't much I can think of in the market. There is much more choice in more expensive niche, unfortunately.

    As for copies and knockoffs, that's a problem in many form of luxury goods. Fast fashion often tries to copy designer brands. Whether that succeeds is another story.

    cacio

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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Lots of things could be cheaper, things used to be built so they could be repaired as well (apparently there's even a right to repair movement now. Think I heard about it in a video about how the big producers of light bulbs had a meeting to discuss and then reduce the lifespan of light bulbs as they started to last too long), alas what really counts is the best way to squeeze as much money out of people as possible and the current model seems to work for these companies.

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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    I have always bought and worn what I liked regardless of the price tag associated with it.
    Remember that while it is perfectly acceptable to criticize the content of a post - criticizing the poster is not.
    Mean spirited, nasty, snide, sarcastic, hateful, and rude individuals on Basenotes don't warrant or deserve my or other Basenoters' acknowledgement or respect.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Interesting topic! I think there already is a strong demand for these kind of fragrances and they sell at a volume that dwarfs our little fraghead world.

    I get your point, but I think most of us don't wear fragrance to smell expensive. We wear it to smell interesting, to smell good, to smell historical or like a piece of art. I'm the same with fashion, I can spend a lot on clothes but I don't want anyone to think "wow he looks expensive!". I do it out of appreciation for the art and creative expression of the designer and wanting to participate in that dialogue. I know not everyone is like this, some would think it's crazy to spend $2500 on a jacket that doesn't advertise it's provenance.

    Fragrance is even more abstract and thus more difficult to really make a judgment on how expensive a smell is. There are lots of fine cheapies on the market and lots of extremely expensive fragrances that would smell like garbage to the average person. So it's not such an easy correlation that might lead to a situation where someone could smell above their means.

    I do think formality is a factor as some fragrances smell quite formal to me while others smell casual. So, if you're a construction worker wearing a formal black tie fragrance there might be a dissonance there, but still I would say go for it to the person who likes that!

    There is, obviously, a correlation between price and quality. For something to be cheap, either someone needs to be exploited, the ingredients need to be cheap, or there needs to be a huge scale (usually all 3 are involved). The scale means it can't be anything particularly bold or artistic because it has to appeal to a wide audience. I'd say that's why they aren't well appreciated by connoisseur such as the members who post here, and that's fine! They have a huge audience, why invest time/money/research into a hobby only to accept the same old stuff everyone likes.

    Anyway, I do get your point that as niche houses inflate their prices ever higher there might be a gap in the market somewhere in the middle for something quality at a decent price. Right now, I'd say that gap is mostly filled by discounters. There's also places like Zara, where just like their fast fashion, they do designer capsule collections (the Jo stuff) to bring a higher level of design at a low price. I've never tried these though so I have no idea.

    There's an extremely interesting podcast about perfume and class by Perfume On the Radio which is a production of the Institute for Art and Olfaction:
    Questions of Class

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    The fallacy of 'smelling expensive' starts with thinking that the Tom Fords of this world actually smell their price.

    Context really is everything. What the person wearing the fragrance looks like, dresses like, where and how they work, where they live: that's the context for how you interpret a fragrance. If you let yourself be impacted by that context then you're probably susceptible to marketing. Which means you're in the realm of judging scents as ideas, and not as fragrances, which is a slippery slope to what I see as a relatively common and confused approach to perfume appreciation and enthusiasm.

    I fully believe one can smell 'expensive' with a limited budget. Vintage fragrances are a great place to start. As are conservative or retro-inspired fragrances. Caron is a great example.

    If you want perfume to be gaudy and ostentatious - conspicuous consumption in olfactive form - then that's another matter. As you say, however, there are plenty of loud, rich, opulent scents that do what Tom Ford's Tuscan Leather does. The clone market is another option offering close copies of modern synthetic fragrances.

    Your point about knock offs v Chanel is one I discussed recently over on fragrantica, and it's the insanity of basically 'fragcomm' getting its hooks in to the minds and thought processes of customers. If you're buying Pineapple Vintage, honestly, you're f'd. There's no other way to say it: you've become a victim of marketing, chasing something you clearly cannot afford (Aventus) for the sake of prestige within virtual communities. You have to be ignorant to consider a brand like Pineapple Vintage anything other than a scam: you have to be deluding yourself, or extremely inexperienced or uninterested in fragrances, to not tell the obvious differences between the original fragrances, and the clones. Brands like that rely on a certain kind of insularity that comes from a meeting of several things - including insecurity, and also a lack of commercial understanding. I am amazed that anyone would even dream of paying £100 for a bottle of clone slop just because the original it is imitating creates a wild effect on so many people/has an online fanbase.

    I also think it needs stating that 'clones' and/or fakery threatens the world of perfume. Yes, profits are clearly gargantuan, and even a few years of selling fragrances can set a business and its owners up for life. However, as you say, there's a commercial and professional chain that occurs within the 'real' perfume world that is undercut by clones and fakes. The buck has to stop somewhere: I have little doubt that the big fashion houses will be lobbying for legal protection of fragrances under copyright protection. They may not succeed but there's a clear motivation for the big brands to do everything they can to protect their business, which is threatened by the explosion of the fakes coming out of the middle east. I wouldn't rule out copyright becoming a factor in fragrances at some point in the future, which would be a tragedy - think about the long lineage of the cologne and how copyrighting that would be devastating for real development and progress. People who buy fakes ought to understand what they're doing: like so much of the present western world, it's a case of trying to have it all right now with little regard for the future.

    There's no need to buy fakes. If you want to smell classical and refined, there are many affordable vintage fragrances that offer that. If you went to smell gaudy and show off, there are affordable scents that do that as well, from Dior's Sauvage to 1 Million and so on. If you want to appreciate the nuances of perfumery, then much of the niche world is interesting, including the Creeds and Tom Fords of this world that meet a middle ground between classical refinement and ingenuity within perfumery. I have no idea why clones and fakes became 'acceptable' but there's a big difference between Montblanc Explorer and CDNIM. One of those is the 'real fake Rolex' of the perfume world (hint: it's not the Montblanc).
    “If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.”
    Currently wearing: Beau de Jour by Tom Ford

  7. #7

    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    I embrace the Live, and Let Live philosophy. I think everyone is consciously or subconsciously a performance art piece. Some performance art pieces require that Tom Ford fragrance, while other performance art pieces require that clone. Another performance art piece might get addicted to consuming, ruin their families, while sharing that performance on YouTube. I respect them as an individual art performance, so I don't feel the need to impose my own values on them. At the end of the day, we're all doing what we believe is right for us. Judging others is as meaningless as judging a character from a movie. We all have our own scripts we live by.

    Now assuming that technology gets advanced enough that companies can create 1:1 dupes, I do think that is a form of stealing. I feel like the only way around this is for companies to actually use expensive ingredients that a clone house might not be able to afford. If a clone house is at a position to be able to dupe the scent with the same expensive ingredients, they might as well tweak the idea and release their own less expensive but high quality line. The more competition there is, the more the end consumer will benefit.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    I buy and wear what I like, regardless of what others think. But if I was concerned with "status", I'd probably choose NOT to wear fragrances much, because it's way too easy to get the "Cologne Guy" reputation.

    As for price point, luckily I'm a big fan of cheapie classics and have found a lot of the more expensive niche stuff overpriced, hyped, bland, pretentious, elitist and uninspiring.

    Nishane Unutamam I guess is my most expensive juice at over 4 euros per ml - but I happen to enjoy Sex Appeal every bit as much, even though it's over sixty times cheaper!
    Spray less, love more.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Conspicuous consumption should never be mistaken for trappings of wealth. I am reading OP’s premise to be more than perfumery alone (?), more part of the fake famous hype machine fueled by Instagram-lifestyle. Altered photos, luxury rentals and limited brand partnering for supposed exposure to followers. Interesting.
    All the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Price does not correlate with smelling 'expensive'.

    Le 3me Homme de Caron or Habit Rouge smells more refined than anything ever released by Tom Ford.

    Moreover, Tom Ford was trying to copy Serge Lutens. Serge Lutens is much better and relatively cheaper.
    Currently wearing: H24 by Hermès

  11. #11

    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Cost was never much of a factor so far if truly liking a fragrance personally.
    Irrespective if expensive but still perceiving this as having (and holding over time) its value for money or, on the contrary, inexpensive but reaching quality levels hardly expected at affordable going rates.
    And thus striving to only own, use and further add mainly if not exclusively fragrances in one of the two aforementioned categories to the current scent lineup.
    Currently wearing: L'Occitan by L'Occitane

  12. #12

    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh V. View Post
    Why not support brands that create original fragrances that won't put you in the poor house?
    I generally try to not think about things like this for other people. I have my own life to keep in order.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    If I were to wear on a budget I would go with these:

    Azzaro Pour Homme
    Ralph Lauren Polo
    Caron Le 3me Homme
    Rasasi Hawas
    Costume National Homme
    Chanel Bleu De Chanel EDT
    Versace Pour Homme
    Dior Eau Sauvage Parfum 2017
    Guerlain Vetiver
    Guerlain L’Instant De Guerlain Pour Homme EDP
    Givenchy Gentleman EDT Originale
    Hermes Bel Ami
    Nicolai New York Intense
    Nicolai Patchouli Intense
    Chanel Egoiste
    Chanel Antaeus
    Guerlain Habit Rouge EDT
    Guerlain Homme EDP
    Guerlain Homme L’Eau Boisee
    Hermes Terre D’Hermes EDT

    Among many others I don’t need to break $150+ to smell excellent and stand out.
    Current Top Favorites:

    Ralph Lauren Polo
    Azzaro Pour Homme
    Chanel Bleu De Chanel EDT
    Chanel Egoiste
    Givenchy Gentleman EDT Originale
    Costume National Homme
    Hermes Bel Ami
    Guerlain Habit Rouge EDT
    Caron Le 3ème Homme
    Chanel Allure Homme Edition Blanche EDP
    Cartier Pasha De Cartier Parfum
    Salvatore Ferragamo F Pour Homme Black
    Currently wearing: Pasha Parfum by Cartier

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    I hate to be the bearer of bad news but the stark reality is this: NOBODY gives a sh!t about how expensive your worn fragrance smells. It’s all in your head. The moment you think of a personal fragrance in this manner is the realisation you’ve fallen line, hook & sinker for its marketing.

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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondflame View Post
    I hate to be the bearer of bad news but the stark reality is this: NOBODY gives a sh!t about how expensive your worn fragrance smells. It’s all in your head. The moment you think of a personal fragrance in this manner is the realisation you’ve fallen line, hook & sinker for its marketing.
    This.
    Currently wearing: H24 by Hermès

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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondflame View Post
    I hate to be the bearer of bad news but the stark reality is this: NOBODY gives a sh!t about how expensive your worn fragrance smells. It’s all in your head. The moment you think of a personal fragrance in this manner is the realisation you’ve fallen line, hook & sinker for its marketing.
    Smart thinking

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    My orthodontist makes this mistake. He doesn’t realize how mantherific he comes across like a Great Value version of The Deep (reference Amazon series The Boys). Trying too hard can absolutely backfire.
    All the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    If you find a fragrance within your honest net budget that not just smells good to you but - and here’s the rub - also inspires you to keep casually smelling your wrist and/or just elevates you in some way, then you’ve already crossed the most important statistical threshold.

    And if you’re someone who appreciates (or actively hopes to accrue) compliments, and if that fragrance that fits your true budget achieves just that, then the good news is that you’ve already crossed yet another threshold . . . simply because the vast majority of the populace aren’t discerning fragheads and will just respond to what they like. They don’t know the landscape of the brands, the hierarchies of designer vs niche bs artisan, the relentless online gatekeeping chitchat, the styles and their respective pyramids, let alone the sourcing of ingredients or their place in the canon of fragrance. So take a breath, smile and enjoy the compliment. It’s not complicated and you’re already a +1 for the day in someone else’s book. Plus as mentioned above you, too, like this scent. That’s a +2 at least for that day alone.

    That’s gotta be (conservatively) at least 99% of the statistical threshold you’ve crossed. Now if we’re feeling super generous and appoint the last 1% of the population to incredibly include those who’ve got fragcomm cred then this fractional remainder of the population might have some skin in the game. But again I have another surprise for you! - While there might be some Fragcomm Gatekeepers in that final 1% even they are a minority because most of those who compose it are just people who know their scents. In other words, they are the ones who might say, “Hey, is that [insert anything from A-Z] fragrance you’re wearing? For them, they just delight in finding others who wear fragrances and equally enjoy trying to guess, the result of which is an easy peazy non-class conscious conversation to get into.

    So in the end you’re likely left with a statistic that likely hovers in the 0.000x% range which might be a Fragcomm Gatekeeper, a burly disciple of the Fragcomm Inquisition who - eghad! - caught you in public wearing something identifiable as not being a discerning fragrance choice. In that case, gawd help you. But let’s be honest, you being on a tangent that day with such a person is almost statistically impossible. And even if you do come across a Fragcomm Gatekeeper roaming about in the wild chances are they are not of the mind to pursue you and jump on the soapbox to disclose their admonishment of your choice of scent.

    Wear what you love and reasonably fits within your budget. And build and scale your collection accordingly.

    Truth be known, you’re probably in more perilous waters spending time in the wrong online fragrance community, listening to opinions from avatars thousands of miles from you whose ideas and stated goals run inimical to your own good sense . . . and sense of scents.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Quote Originally Posted by ultravisitor View Post
    I generally try to not think about things like this for other people. I have my own life to keep in order.
    When I asked, "Why not support brands that create original fragrances that won't put you in the poor house?" I meant people in general, including myself.

    My own experiences related to what I said in the my OP:

    Regarding knock-offs

    I've bought a handful of clones and knock-offs. When I wasn't happy with current Drakkar Noir and reluctant to buy it, I instead sought out Classic Match, Akthar Noir, and "Dakar." I rationalized it by saying I didn't like the real stuff enough to buy it. However, in hindsight, that's BS because had their been no knock-off alternatives I would have ended up buying the real Guy La Roche Drakkar Noir a lot sooner.

    I liked Kouros but felt it was too heavy a scent for me. I saw a YouTube video hyping up The Man Silver as being just like Kouros but "15% fresher," so I jumped at the chance to buy it at $10. Then recently came the announcement that YSL is discontinuing Kouros. I'm sure that there are many other factors that played a part in the companies decision, but knock-off Kouros scents can't be helping its sales.

    Wearing designer brand fragrances at 13

    I remember asking my mom for Cool Water when I started junior high. All the cool kids were wearing cologne, and that one being one of the popular ones so I asked for it and got it. Looking back, that instills a skewed mentality in a young kid. If there's now a "standard" at that young an age to be wearing expensive designer brand fragrances without actually having had the life experience to earn it ie having a job, demonstrating fiscal responsibility, etc, it's no wonder that the new "standard" for 20 year olds wanting to smell good is a $300+ bottle of Creed Aventus.

    Regarding budget-friendly scents vs spending $ I don't have

    I remember counting pennies when I was working and going to college. And yet I still managed to find time and money to go with friends to a club once in a great while. I remember saving up for Issey Miyake, because I had to wear an expensive fragrance when I went out, right? Along with the expensive fit that had me eating Top Ramen for a minute. Really, a good portion of people at the club are trying to put up this façade of living some luxurious life style that they can't actually afford.

    Looking back at that time, I had just enough to splurge on a $20 and under fragrance, minus everything else (club admission, overpriced drinks, outfit). But back then I had this notion that I had to wear something relatively expensive. In reality, I was good with just some Old Spice Pure Sport deodorant. If wanted to smell extra good, $5 Axe was readily available.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondflame View Post
    I hate to be the bearer of bad news but the stark reality is this: NOBODY gives a sh!t about how expensive your worn fragrance smells. It’s all in your head. The moment you think of a personal fragrance in this manner is the realisation you’ve fallen line, hook & sinker for its marketing.
    How do I like this thrice!?

    “Always do what is right. It will gratify half of mankind and astound the other.”
    ― Mark Twain

  21. #21

    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    I think it would be more fair to say that some people will care about how expensive your fragrance is, and some people won't care. It is up to you to decide who's opinion you truly care about.

  22. #22

    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    I don’t entertain knockoffs but among legitimate brands I think that good (and bad) quality perfumes can be found at any price point. I wear some pricy and some less expensive perfumes and in the past year the most compliments I have gotten were for 4711 cologne @ about $75 for an 800 ml bottle, that I’ve been going around using as a sanitizer.
    ​"It was foolish of her not to have bought a larger bottle."

    Dorothy Eden, The Time of the Dragon

  23. #23

    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Education and experience is what consumers need. These days, a $100 designer fragrance is often very similar in quality to a $400 niche fragrance (depending on the brand). People just need to be discerning and sample widely. This issue is not limited to fragrances anyway, and luxury companies know this.
    Currently wearing: Halfeti by Penhaligon's

  24. #24

    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Quote Originally Posted by chypre View Post
    Education and experience is what consumers need. These days, a $100 designer fragrance is often very similar in quality to a $400 niche fragrance (depending on the brand). People just need to be discerning and sample widely. This issue is not limited to fragrances anyway, and luxury companies know this.
    I have also found this to be true.
    ​"It was foolish of her not to have bought a larger bottle."

    Dorothy Eden, The Time of the Dragon

  25. #25

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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh V. View Post
    I was thinking about the ubiquity of knock-offs like Rasasi's La Yuqawam which copy Tom Ford's Tuscan Leather. Why pay $200+ when you can fake it for $50 and smell like your wearing $200 fragrance?
    There is another side to this.
    Down here in Australia one can buy Palermo's 50ml bottle version of Tom Ford Tobacco Vanille for A$35 (US$26).
    The vanilla smells cheapish and synthetic compared to the original, but the copy garners lots of positive comments from women. And as one chap who owns both attests in the Palermo thread in the Australian Shopping Guide sub-forum - in sharp contrast, he's never had a compliment when wearing the original.

    So, which should one go for - the original or the compliment getter?
    Cheers,
    Renato

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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Quote Originally Posted by Rabidsenses View Post
    [...] inspires you to keep casually smelling your wrist and/or just elevates you in some way [...]
    The only thing I care about.
    Currently wearing: Jaïpur Homme by Boucheron

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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Quote Originally Posted by Renato View Post
    There is another side to this.
    Down here in Australia one can buy Palermo's 50ml bottle version of Tom Ford Tobacco Vanille for A$35 (US$26).
    The vanilla smells cheapish and synthetic compared to the original, but the copy garners lots of positive comments from women. And as one chap who owns both attests in the Palermo thread in the Australian Shopping Guide sub-forum - in sharp contrast, he's never had a compliment when wearing the original.

    So, which should one go for - the original or the compliment getter?
    Cheers,
    Renato
    For me personally, at this point in time, I'd rather sacrifice those positive compliments from women than support a business that makes knock-offs of other people's hard work.

  28. #28

    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh V. View Post
    For me personally, at this point in time, I'd rather sacrifice those positive compliments from women than support a business that makes knock-offs of other people's hard work.
    If they smell differently then is it still a knock off? What's the difference between inspiration and rip off?

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    Quote Originally Posted by imm0rtelle View Post
    If they smell differently then is it still a knock off? What's the difference between inspiration and rip off?
    I'm assuming that it's a knock-off since Renato described it as a copy.

    There's a fine line between inspiration and rip-off when it comes to scent alone.

    Parfums Paris Dakar is marketed as a Drakkar Noir knock-off, from the name to the bottle design. And yet it smells closer to Carrera Black. It doesn't change the fact that it's trying to piggy back on the hard work and reputation of Guy La Roche's Drakkar Noir and make people think it's a cheaper version of it. Usually these types of fragrances even have a sticker that says "Our Version of..."

    Drakkar Noir itself has inspired other "legit" fragrances that smell very similar to it. Abercrombie and Fitch's Woods smells very similar to it and yet I'd never get that impression just by looking at the name or packaging.

    On the other hand Rasasi has a fragrance called "Royale" that's reported to smell very close to vintage Drakkar Noir yet nothing in its presentation would clue you into that. However, just for googling Rasasi fragrances I'm seeing that they have "La Yuqawam" which is supposed to smell like Tuscan Leather, "Al Wisam Day" which is supposed to smell like Creed's Silver Mountain Water, and "Erga" which is supposed to smell like Green Irish Tweed. In that company's case, it seems less like having inspiration once in a while, and more like making it their business strategy and branding to copy designer and niche fragrances and offer just cheaper versions of them.

    And I've been hypocritical in regards to this. I bought Cuba Black a year ago, an Azzaro clone/knock-off, after being displeased with my purchase of the the current reformulation of Azzaro Pour Homme. To my surprise Cuba Black only smells like Azzaro for the first minute before becoming this entirely different soapy-tobacco smell that's clearly a good scent in its own right. I've praised Cuba Black repeatedly at this forum. And yet, to my knowledge, the entire Cuba fragrance line is meant to offer cheap knock-off alternatives to popular designer fragrances. So I have to rethink that as well. Just because I already paid money for the real thing, and just because I think Cuba Fragrances came out with a unique scent that I happen to like, does that justify my support of them?

  30. #30

    Default Re: Wearing a budget-friendly scent vs. smelling above your financial means

    I feel like if the clone house can create a "better" version than the original then they should get some credit. But, does this happen often? I feel like most people settle for the clones more for financial reasons than because the clone smells better.




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