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  1. #1

    Default Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    I'm a relative newbie to the fragrance game but one thing that has struck me is just how little love AdP seems to get in the community and I wondered if there's something I'm missing?

    They must be classed as niche I suppose in the sense that they are mainly a fragrance house. I'm wearing Colonia Leather tonight and I think it's amazing, along with OG Colonia, Oud, Ambra and Fico Di Amalfi.

    So, a serious question - is it seen as been gauche within the fragrance community and if so, why?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Good question.

    A store here just got the line and I think the new Colonia Futura is an amazing vetiver fragrance that isn’t sold as such. Plan to try the OG next.


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  3. #3

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    I got a sample of Futura from the store when it first came out last summer and really didn't care for it. Finished it off just the other day in the cold weather here and really enjoyed it and yes, you're right - big vetiver vibes from it. Should also have said that I really like Sandalo, although I appreciate it has nothing to do with sandalwood.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Based on my vintage bottle of Assoluta, AdP's quality has diminished over the years.

    AdP is still a fairly good value house at discounters, but I'm just not sure it has many truly great compositions. There are other houses in the AdP "lane" that offer higher quality, but at a higher a pricepoint.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Not sure this will really answer your question but my own observations...

    The primary scents they are most known for are mostly their very traditional cologne like scents with generally limited longevity as with most colognes.
    They have branched into a lot of other areas of scent fairly broadly, but don't seem to get as much pick up and chatting as with their core scents.

    I don't they are seen as gauche at all and you should wear away if you like them.

    They have some awesome male grooming products....just pricey.
    I don't get out much. But when I do, I smell real good.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    It's probably because of the discrepancy between the fragrances and their marketing.

    They're riding the crest of the wave of the current fragrance market, which is all about being bought by huge cosmetic or beauty/fashion conglomerates who will either use your 'new kid on the block appeal' (Le Labo) or historic legacy as a brand (Acqua di Parma) as a key selling point, all while effectively using you to churn out another branch of the same kind of homogenised fragrances that everyone else sells.

    That's a slightly cynical way of look at it but that is the business model: many brands all come under one large umbrella for marketing, sales, the perfumers used, and all the rest of it. The 'difference' between many of these houses is often just superficial, or perhaps one or two key brand identifiers. In the case of Acqua di Parma, that would be the idea of Italy and located fragrances - but, really, this is something Tom Ford and many other brands do as well. Just search for fragrances with 'Amalfi' in the name! Hence the frustration at even the defining features of a brand - which are already superficial in the first place - becoming absorbed in to the homogenised mass.

    Acqua di Parma have top class marketing and branding. Their bottles look great. They suggest something that correlates to the fragrance inside. Their high price tag, widespready visibility and availability in department stores, and distinct lack of 'designer smell' in the top notes makes them appeal to many first-time niche buyers who will pay full price under the illusion of buying 'quality'. I was in this exact scenario, I knew the brand from shopping in places like John Lewis but never went near them due to the price. However, they were one of the first niche houses I tried when I was branching out and discovering perfume.

    The reality soon sets in that the superficial appeal of Acqua di Parma's fragrances doesn't last. Not if/when you start trying a wide range of fragrances. This is reflected in their lack of value on the grey market, and what costs £160 for 150ml from a shop can be bought for as little as £40-50 online.

    The performance of their fragrances is often poor, given that their scents are designed to be light, fresh, citrusy, and convey something of Italian chic. Personally, I prefer the kind of laid back style as opposed to the more traditional, highly strung fresh colognes from France, or the somewhat dour, functional English cologne style. Although, to what extent we can even call these distinct styles anymore in the age of transnationalism is another matter entirely - I'd say these are selling 'ideas' of Italy moreso than they are Italian; they're tourism in perfume, except it's not the Riviera, it's more 'Little Caesar's'.

    On top of their poor performance (light, weak), they overuse some ingredients. In their colognes, it's white-soapy musk, which I believe is in keeping with traditional Italian perfumery. For their heavier, darker, oriental fragrances, it's modern woody ambers and other fairly 'safe' synthetics. Irrespective of the top and middle notes, so many of their scents end up being built upon similar bases and smells, many of which are common in the fragrance world.

    The biggest reason for their lack of love online, I feel, is how they compare to the competition. They're a bit...meh. Taking everything in to account, they're not terrible by any means, but a lot of the appeal is in the branding and the physical beauty of the bottles, the simplicity of the concepts and so on. All brands suffer this problem - or, benefit from it - of course; for Acqua di Parma, though, the big problem comes in the form of wearing. Their fragrances are nice and 'safe' in the niche realm: that makes them easy to wear and, largely, forgettable. They're nice, clean, and even in their oriental line, they're unlikely to annoy anyone. But polarising and being extreme is good in the internet age: it produces interest, discussion, and loyalty. Even bad attention is still attention, and that is the key metric: are people discussing, displaying, and showing your fragrances on the various social media platforms (no-one would have bothered to buy Secretions Magnifique unless there was a social reward system online, in the form of being able to discuss digust)? If not, if you just inspire 'meh', then you fall by the wayside, even if what you've actually done is produce something far better and more wearable than most of the 'polarising' fragrances that receive more attention.

    They don't stand up well in comparison to some other houses that protect their brands with more ferocity. Creed, for instance: part of the appeal is clearly in performance, market-leading, and so on. But I also think a lot more people would be clamouring for the Acqua di Parma Blu line if their fragrances weren't so easy to buy for 1/3rd of the retail price. Part of the allue of Creed and Chanel is the fact their fragrances never hit discounters. It is this exclusivity that produces a scarcity mindset among buyers - because these scents are expensive, and unlikely to come down in price, people spend more time discussing and debating a purchase, as well as evaluating their 'worth' or merit as fragrances, trying to reach some kind of social consensus about whether it is acceptable to spend £250 for 100ml of perfume. Considering the variety of people who contribute to online discussions, the likelihood that many if not a majority of people can actually afford to spend that on fragrance is probably quite slim. The appeal of Creed is intrinsically tied to their ability to protect their products and maintain an aspirational customer, irrespective of whether that buyer is the kind of 'aspirational' buyer the brand was appealing to in the 1980s and 90s. The world has changed.

    Acqua di Parma also seems to appeal more generally to women. Not by any great extent, but many of their masculine fragrances have feminine sensibilities. But most of all, their lack of 'sexy' male fragrance is what keeps people away. Every brand needs a sexy male fragrance to be worthy of consideration by men. Don't believe me? Check out Dior, Chanel, Creed, YSL and so on. Sauvage, BdC, Aventus, Y...there's no Acqua di Parma equivalent. And this is where their segment in the market - their position as entry-level, approachable, easily accesible niche catering to a middle class customer - holds them back for enthusiasts. If they watered down the brand by trying to appeal to a lower common denomintor, i.e. 'sexy', they would lose some of their superficial charm to their current clients. On the other hand, due to being owned by LVMH, they are not in full control of their own brand and the direction of the house. If they wanted to 'modernise' and update themselves in to the 21st Century in the same way Creed did, trading on both their historic legacy while at the same time wanting to truly stay with the times and at the cutting edge of 'what people want', they couldn't do it. They are just one cog in a much larger perfume market, where each brand plays it parts, dancing to the strings of the parent company.

    Again, you can look at this with cynicism and see it as a negative but really there's no need. They are what they are, they do what they do. They were bought in 2001 and since then the brand has grown massively, protected against failure through acquisition. They have their charms, for sure, and they are a way for certain fragrances, ideas, and perfumers to create something that comes to market.

    I find many of their light, fresh fragrances - the Blu Med line - to be really enjoyable but none wow me. I have looked long and hard for a light, fresh, citric cologne (particularly orange-based) and this is exactly what Acqua di Parma offer, yet none of their scents appealed to me enough to buy and keep a full bottle. They're just 'fine'. And fine works for a lot of people but not for many enthusiasts/collectors, and not for me - for different reasons.

    Finally, their recent trend of trying to pivot the brand to appeal to China - they have an 'Asian' line of fragrances - seemed to fall flat on its face. The fragrances are not good. They're not nice, and though they may sell well in the east given the branding, they've received little to no attention or commendation in this side of the world. And that's because they're not very good. Likewise, their middle east-inspired and targeted fragrances - the ones that were in brown, now black, bottles - have come to a halt, seemingly out of ideas, with each new release receiving less praise and interest than the previous. In what seems like a rather desperate attempt to keep flogging the brand, they're releasing more and more 'limited edition' fragrances - nothing to do with the scent, everything to do with the (admittedly attractive) bottles and packaging. They've just released a limited edition Bergamotto which is an interesting concept, based on naturals, but I'm not sure how much interest that will really generate. All of these decisions probably produce good sales, it should be said, but not the 'love' you're asking about.

    I'm not sure what they would have to do in order to receive more of this 'love'. I can't seem them weakening the brand image by going (more) mass market in the form of a 'sexy' mass-seller. I can't see them significantly improving the quality of their fragrances. I have to assume they have a good business model and that's it working well and is highly profitable as they've visibily expanded across the UK in the last 5 years.

    I do like the new Futura. It's a nice, earthy, spicy cologne. I also like Pura. But still...there's just something a bit 'meh' about them. They're good, but that's it. They're safe, easy, the kind of thing you're happy trying and buying then and there in a department store. But it doesn't translate to timeless or subtle elegance, for some reason, in the way that other safe or seemingly underwhelming fragrances do. The Colonia flankers are all interesting (the original smells quite dated by modern standards) but you can find better alternatives for similar prices from the competition. If you don't know the competition, then great! Ignorance is bliss. But most of us on here, and elsewhere, have tried enough to know how and what to compare their scents to, and they don't hold up well. As a prime example, Colonia Essenza seems to have been one that caught the hearts and minds of fledgling fragcomm back in 2010. For whatever reason, that status persists to this day among men, that Essenza is 'the best' or 'great'. In large part it seems to be a lack of actually trying the other Colonias, or knowing of other cologne-style scents from other brands, because Essenza isn't great. What it is, however, is prime Acqua di Parma: style over substance. The bottle is gorgeous, the black appeals to men (despite the feminine-floral aroma), and the difference to designer fragrances means most people are happy not questioning the prevailing wisdom/marketing. That sums up the brand.
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  7. #7

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    I always think that (the colonia, anyway) it is universally loved. I love it, anyway and yes, the grooming products are awesome. Some of the others in the line are hit and miss but the original is a Titan among colognes. IMO.
    Very clearly a case for corn flakes and classics

  8. #8

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    The OG is great. I feel like the launch of TF Neroli Portofino sort of stole the AdP thunder with a newer, more modern take on "resort" freshies. I do like Colonia Club and Fico though. The newer non-fresh fragrances weaken the brand IMO.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hazzle77 View Post
    I'm a relative newbie to the fragrance game but one thing that has struck me is just how little love AdP seems to get in the community and I wondered if there's something I'm missing?

    They must be classed as niche I suppose in the sense that they are mainly a fragrance house. I'm wearing Colonia Leather tonight and I think it's amazing, along with OG Colonia, Oud, Ambra and Fico Di Amalfi.

    So, a serious question - is it seen as been gauche within the fragrance community and if so, why?
    You basically just cited the best ones of AdP. I love AdP, but at discounter/ebay pricing - full retail is just ridiculous in view of what it delivers.
    I personally love Leather, Oud and Ambra, also Colonia Intensa and Note di Colonia III. Mirra and Sandalwood are just good, imo. The 'Blu' line is meh, with poor projection, with Fico and Mirto being probably the most interesting (or the less boring, depends the point of view).

  10. #10

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    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Yes, ADP seem to have fallen out of favour here in the last decade. But it was a biggie here the decade before that.

    I personally would have said it relates to their scents generally not lasting long enough, but the same happened to numerous other houses that didn't have longevity issues but were really big here for a while, examples - Lorenzo Villoresi, Maître Parfumeur et Gantier, Etro, Annik Goutal, L'Artisan, Trumper, Floris.

    I still have bottles of ADP Lavanda Tonica and my wife has ADP Profumo which I gave her, which you've probably never heard of. Lavanda Tonica is still my favourite male lavender scent of all time - and lasts a bit longer than Colonia and the like..
    Regards,
    Renato

  11. #11

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Quote Originally Posted by Oviatt View Post
    I always think that (the colonia, anyway) it is universally loved. I love it, anyway and yes, the grooming products are awesome. Some of the others in the line are hit and miss but the original is a Titan among colognes. IMO.
    The original is my favorite by far, a few of the flankers were nice while the others remaining I didn't care for.
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  12. #12

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Quote Originally Posted by Renato View Post
    [...]
    I personally would have said it relates to their scents generally not lasting long enough[...]
    I agree for the regular Colonia and the Blu Mediterraneo lines, but what I've tried from the Ingredient Collection have a performance that range from good (i.e. Ambra) to great (i.e Oud and Leather)..
    That said, even for the regular Colonia and Blu lines, AdP delivers decent juice for very honest [online] pricing ($40/50 for 100ml of Colonias, $50/60 for 150ml for the Blu ones...), packaged.marketed as above average lines. So overall no masterpiece and nothing ultra refined, but better bang-for-the-buck than the usual mall scents.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    I personally think they lost favor overextending themselves. The original Colonia never jived with me but I love Essenza and some others. But the whole Blu/Med line just seemed to be a never ending push of new releases that seemed “meh” and took away from the Colonia line. I know there are some really good ones in the Blu line but I can’t tell you how many times I’ve googled “what are the best AdP scents.” They watered down the line. I may be wrong but it seems that way to me. Here’s the deal, I love traveling to Italy more than anywhere. I love the culture, food, wine, scents: I’ve been to Capri, the Amalfi Coast, Tuscany etc and the Blu/Med line reminds me of nothing. So I’m enamored with finding a traditional Italian cologne but I just think they went away from their bread and butter.
    Last edited by ToughCool; 8th May 2021 at 11:37 AM.
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  14. #14
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    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Speaking only for myself, some I thought were better than others, but I find the house to be mediocre at best.
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  15. #15

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Quote Originally Posted by ToughCool View Post
    [...]Here’s the deal, I love traveling to Italy more than anywhere. I love the culture, food, wine, scents: I’ve been to Capri, the Amalfi Coast, Tuscany etc and the Blu/Med line reminds me of nothing. So I’m enamored with finding a traditional Italian cologne but I just think they went away from their bread and butter.[...]
    It's so pleasant to have someone say that loud. My father is from the town of Amalfi (in the middle of the coast, with smell of citrons, lemons and lemon flowers everywhere), and I have never found a single fragrance with the 'Amalfi' or 'Capri' on the label that remotely reminded of these places.

    The AdP Fico di Amalfi fragrance made some noise at Amalfi within locals, who were laughing at it, since it smells nothing like the fig tree, fig leaves or fresh figs. My father often told me how he remember biting in these huge, juicy, white figs when chilling out under the lemon trees, and telling me that it's a shame that these species of fig tree has nearly disappeared and that fragrance didn't help him remind that time, not even remotely - noting that nowadays, there are nearly no fig cultivations anymore around Amalfi, only lemons and some citrons (and no, there has NEVER EVER been any bergamot around, which have always been cultivated souther, in Calabria, nor any oranges in Capri).

    All this rant to say that 'Fig of Amalfi' and 'Orange of Capri' is just marketing BS.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    I think ADP is universally liked, universally respected with lots of likable releases. However, nothing ever pushes the boundaries. If it's an EKG chart, you won't see a heart attack. The peaks and valleys stay a respectable distance from center, but don't stray too far. Add to that longevity issues for the lighter fares and that's how they land in the niche landscape.

    I have a fair amount of their releases and enjoy them quite a bit - Pura, Intensa, Essenza, Oud, Leather.
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  17. #17
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    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Maybe they aren’t beast mode enough or pricey enough to receive the ticket to the premium stage. Or maybe they need better marketing strategies.
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  18. #18

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Thanks for the responses - really interesting to know the background on people's thoughts. I might be lucky with the longevity/projection because other than the Blu line, everything seems to last for ages on me.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    They’ve got my love. I’m wearing Colonia right now and I love it.

    It is much talk about beast mode fragrances today. ADP is not about that type of fragrances, and me neither, and maybe they lose a few people because of that.

  20. #20

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hazzle77 View Post
    Thanks for the responses - really interesting to know the background on people's thoughts. I might be lucky with the longevity/projection because other than the Blu line, everything seems to last for ages on me.
    Happy to have you here. Always keep in mind that really the only opinion that really counts is yours.

    Everybody will have opinions on everything based on their own experiences but none of us are going to buy frags for you.

    No one really thinks the Acqua de Parma scents are "bad"- just a lot of us have found things we prefer.
    I don't get out much. But when I do, I smell real good.

  21. #21

    Default Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hazzle77 View Post
    I'm a relative newbie to the fragrance game but one thing that has struck me is just how little love AdP seems to get in the community and I wondered if there's something I'm missing?

    They must be classed as niche I suppose in the sense that they are mainly a fragrance house. I'm wearing Colonia Leather tonight and I think it's amazing, along with OG Colonia, Oud, Ambra and Fico Di Amalfi.

    So, a serious question - is it seen as been gauche within the fragrance community and if so, why?
    I am not sure why you conclude “little love”?

    There’s at least two huge AdP love threads that I know of (I am on Tapatalk mobile - linking threads is a pain) and I hear generally only good things. I guess it is relative: sure, it doesn’t have the dedication and number of threads like Creed, specifically Aventus with its own sub forum has, but from what I have seen, read and participated in, there is a lot of love and respect for AdP. So I do not share your conclusion at all.

    AdP is an excellent house and I have become somewhat of a fanboy (I even own the leather key chain, use the barbiere facial scrub and have their shower gels - at one point I must have my head examined ).

    What AdP excels in is “gentlemanly fresh”. In the sense of fresh out of the barber, freshly dressed up. Not shower gel fresh. No, AdP has a classy, gentlemanly aura they manage to produce with most of their fragrances. Like a fellow basenotes mentioned, even their Oud is fresh. They’re masters of their game.

    At least that’s my admittedly very biased opinion.


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  22. #22

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Quote Originally Posted by deltasun View Post
    I think ADP is universally liked, universally respected with lots of likable releases. However, nothing ever pushes the boundaries. If it's an EKG chart, you won't see a heart attack. The peaks and valleys stay a respectable distance from center, but don't stray too far. Add to that longevity issues for the lighter fares and that's how they land in the niche landscape.

    I have a fair amount of their releases and enjoy them quite a bit - Pura, Intensa, Essenza, Oud, Leather.
    Good point. They’re safe and consistent. Nothing outrageous, no “panty droppers” (as some YouTube “reviewers” like to classify their scents ) and surely no beast mode (although try to not get noticed with their Leather release). But they excel at their style which is Colonias and They manage to have a recognizable DNA throughout their line.


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  23. #23

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Quote Originally Posted by Renato View Post
    Yes, ADP seem to have fallen out of favour here in the last decade. But it was a biggie here the decade before that.

    I personally would have said it relates to their scents generally not lasting long enough, but the same happened to numerous other houses that didn't have longevity issues but were really big here for a while, examples - Lorenzo Villoresi, Maître Parfumeur et Gantier, Etro, Annik Goutal, L'Artisan, Trumper, Floris.
    I think what these houses all have in common is that they're largely "unsexy" - which makes them unworthy fodder for a fragcomm that is less excited by artful perfumery than it is the prospect of "compliments."

    The other side of the fragcomm is interested in daring niche, stuff like animalic oud-bombs and conceptual scents.

    Most of the houses above traffic in "classic" aesthetics. The best of their creations are immaculate but do not push boundaries or induce rapturous compliments.

    AdP sits somewhat awkwardly between modern masstiche and the classic styles. The bottle of Colonia Assoluta I recently acquired (back from the pre-2007 days when it was the only Colonia flanker) is rich and satisfying and resolutely old-school (on the level of a Villoresi), but the most recent formulation is modern and sleek and awash in synthetic musks. That may or may not be an illustration of where the house has ended up: a mass-market "traditional" house that is actually just trading in contemporary market trends with a bit of "classic" varnish drizzled on top.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Colonia Oud & Colonia Leather first batches were great even in terms of Price/ Quality ratio...
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  25. #25
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    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Amazing posts, slpfrsly and Brooks Otterlake! You both have some very good points.

    Aqua di Parma is a house that caught my attention a while ago, but I haven't been able to see them in the stores nearby to actually try them out, and they're out of my budget range for blind-buying (even in discounters), so I'm kind of waiting for an opportunity to either try them out in a store or finding a cheap enough bottle that would interest me enough.

    I am mostly interested in several citrusy ones as I love citruses and Mandorlo di Sicilia as I do love almond and I have read many praising comments about it (from women, mind you, but it is marketed unisex anyway).
    I haven't heard anything bad about the house, so it is definitely not gauche, just, as guys have mentioned before, probably not megaluxurious enough/not sexy enough/not beastmode enough to gain cult popularity in fragrance community. But if these three traits are not the primary things why you're enjoying fragrance, I think there's no point in avoiding the house.

  26. #26

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    They have love, just not fanaticism.

    When you consider the era in which the company was founded, the kind of fragrance (which was mainly a citrus eau de cologne), and who they aimed their products at you can’t really say they’ve done a bad job. I think they’ve tried to stay true to their roots and in doing so haven’t veered too far away from the eau de cologne style of fragrance except to try and introduce novelty with their Blu Med line, their Ingredient line to keep up with their department store Joneses and peripheral shaving and grooming items.

    I don’t think they’re delusional or daft in their offerings and don’t think anyone buying their products would either. They know what would and wouldn’t fly within the Acqua di Parma brand. If they suddenly started putting Cambodian oud, real Ambergris and Deer Musk into their bottles and pricing them at £700 a pop for 8ml people would be looking at them sideways.
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  27. #27
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    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sheik Yerbouti View Post
    I don’t think they’re delusional or daft in their offerings and don’t think anyone buying their products would either. They know what would and wouldn’t fly within the Acqua di Parma brand. If they suddenly started putting Cambodian oud, real Ambergris and Deer Musk into their bottles and pricing them at £700 a pop for 8ml people would be looking at them sideways.
    This is a good point.

    Their 'boutique' line of fragrances, the 'Note di Colonias', are very well branded but don't seem to have made any sort of splash online - precisely because no-one is really going to fall for the marketing (quite why the online 'fragcomm' falls for Amouage's branding is a mystery to me, but that's another matter). They're 'inspired by Opera', and so on; that's the sort of thing that would sell well to the same sort of customers who buy the Blu Med line but want something richer, stronger etc.

    Their Note di Colonias are good. Not exceptional, but good. They do smell richer, stronger, more carefully constructed and so on than the mid range scents - not by a lot, but enough to be a noticeable difference, which is all that matters to justify the huge difference in price. But even in their high end line, they maintain an idea of Italy - clean, classical, some oriental and liturgical influences in the form of resins and incense, but by and large they are still citric-colognes with woody-herbal bases. That's the brand, that's what they are, that's what they do well, and it all comes from the original Colonia scent.

    I'd quite like to see them re-release some of their older Blu Med scents. I'm intrigued to try their seaweed fragrance in particular, and basil and lavender fragrances would be in keeping with the classical nature of the brand - but, as mentioned by several people now, they're more focused on selling ideas and associations of their history than preserving it as it truly is or was.
    “If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.”
    Currently wearing: Beau de Jour by Tom Ford

  28. #28

    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Depends also very much on the range/series, but personally speaking have hardly ever enjoyed (and thus also been willing to recommend further) both the classic EDC style of Colonia plus flankers, yet also the almost single-note takes on light refreshing, relaxing fragrance themes in the "younger", more casual Blu Mediterraneo one

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy the frenchy View Post
    It's so pleasant to have someone say that loud. My father is from the town of Amalfi (in the middle of the coast, with smell of citrons, lemons and lemon flowers everywhere), and I have never found a single fragrance with the 'Amalfi' or 'Capri' on the label that remotely reminded of these places.

    The AdP Fico di Amalfi fragrance made some noise at Amalfi within locals, who were laughing at it, since it smells nothing like the fig tree, fig leaves or fresh figs. My father often told me how he remember biting in these huge, juicy, white figs when chilling out under the lemon trees, and telling me that it's a shame that these species of fig tree has nearly disappeared and that fragrance didn't help him remind that time, not even remotely - noting that nowadays, there are nearly no fig cultivations anymore around Amalfi, only lemons and some citrons (and no, there has NEVER EVER been any bergamot around, which have always been cultivated souther, in Calabria, nor any oranges in Capri).

    All this rant to say that 'Fig of Amalfi' and 'Orange of Capri' is just marketing BS.
    Bingo! Spent a lot of time on Amalfi Coast and there is so much built around lemons and citrus...limoncello, etc. It’s so fragrant in the air. Same with figs like you said. As I said I get nothing. I see the names and say “this is for me” and they don’t get close.
    "Desperation is a stinky cologne."
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    Currently wearing: Aventus by Creed

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Acqua di Parma - why so little love?

    Nice house IMO.




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